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Magnesium - properties, deficiency symptoms, best sources

Magnesium - check properties, deficiency symptoms, sources in food, recommended daily intake

Nina Wawryszuk - AuthorAuthorNina Wawryszuk
Nina Wawryszuk - Author
AuthorNina Wawryszuk
Natu.Care Editor

Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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Witold Tomaszewski - Reviewed byReviewed byWitold Tomaszewski
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Witold Tomaszewski - Reviewed by
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Doctor of Medicine, food and pharmaceutical law expert and experienced medical professional.

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Michael Tomaszewski - Edited byEdited byMichael Tomaszewski
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Graduate of Journalism and Artes Liberales at the University of Warsaw. Since 2017, he has been working with the biggest portals in Poland and abroad as an editor. Previously worked for 3 years in one of the leading pharmaceutical companies - he knows the health and beauty industry inside out. In his free time, he most enjoys playing tennis or skiing.

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At Natu.Care, she educates about healthy lifestyles and debunks dangerous myths, contrasting them with the results of the latest scientific research. Additionally, she is interested in new technologies and their impact on health and everyday life.

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Magnesium - properties, deficiency symptoms, best sources
29 April, 2024
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Magnesium is associated with the normal function of muscles and the nervous system. When we have cramps or our eyelids twitch, our intuition tells us we are deficient in it. We know to eat dark chocolate to replenish it in our diet. Can magnesium surprise us with anything else? Yes!

Find out what else magnesium is responsible for in the body, what other symptoms of magnesium deficiency there are and check out recipes for magnesium meals. I have written about magnesium without secrets together with experts - Witold Tomaszewski, MD, PhD, and clinical nutritionist Marta Kaczorek. 

Magnesium without secrets.

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Description of contents:

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  1. Properties of magnesium
  2. .
  3. Magnesium deficiency - symptoms
  4. .
  5. Magnesium excess - symptoms
  6. .
  7. Sources of magnesium. In which products is magnesium present
  8. .
  9. Daily magnesium requirements
  10. .
  11. Which magnesium is best absorbed
  12. .
  13. Magnesium-filled meals - recipes from a nutritionist
  14. .
  15. Summary
  16. .
  17. FAQ - frequently asked questions
  18. .
Sleep Well - a dietary supplement for good sleep and calmness .

Sleep Well - dietary supplement for good sleep and tranquillity

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Sleep Well is a calming and relaxing dietary supplement with a standardised complex of CALMOMIX® herbal extracts and high quality magnesium.

See more
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See also: 

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Properties of magnesium

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Magnesium, just after potassium, is the most abundant cation in the body , influencing the action of over 600 enzymes ! This means it is involved in a huge number of processes in your body. 

One of its primary roles is to assist biochemical reactionsand. Magnesium is involved in, among other things:

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  • converting food into energy,
  • .
  • the formation of new proteins from amino acids,
  • .
  • in the formation and repair of DNA and RNA,
  • .
  • in support of muscle contraction and diastole,
  • .
  • regulation of neurotransmitters,
  • .

What does magnesium help with?
  • Promotes the proper functioning of the systems: nervous , circulatory  and muscular .
  • Facilitates calcium absorption into bone cells .
  • Strengthens the skeletal system and prevents osteoporosis .
  • May alleviate symptoms of depression and affect mental well-being .
  • May affect better quality of sleep .
  • Reduces the severity and occurrence of migraines .
  • Reduces blood pressure .
  • .
  • Regulates blood glucose levels .
  • Reduces inflammation in the body .
  • Participates in insulin metabolism .
  • May relieve symptoms of premenstrual syndrome .
  • Has the potential to improve endurance, fitness and strength .

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. About 50% of the total magnesium in the body is found in the bones. The other half is mainly found inside the cells of the body's tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in the blood.

Check out other articles about minerals and learn about their interesting properties!

Magnesium deficiency - symptoms

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Your eyelids have been twitching for a few days, you've been accompanied by irritability, and maybe even cramps in your calves. I'm deficient in magnesium -you think. Find out how else too little magnesium in the body can manifest itself.

Symptoms of magnesium deficiency includeand:

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  • muscle tremors and cramps,
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  • muscle aches and weakness,
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  • tingling and sensory disturbances (e.g. facial),
  • .
  • feeling of fatigue, 
  • .
  • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite,
  • .
  • arrhythmia, uneven heartbeat,
  • .
  • irritability, nervousness, worsening of mood,
  • .
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The above symptoms may or may not indicate a magnesium deficiency in the body. Eyelid tremor, often reported and searched for on the internet, may also indicate a deficiency of potassium, B vitamins or calcium. If in doubt, consult your doctor or pharmacist.
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dr. n..

Dr. n. med. Witold Tomaszewski

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Who is at risk of magnesium deficiency in the body?

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Check if you are at risk, or if your loved one may be at risk of deficiency of this valuable element.

Factors contributing to magnesium deficiencyand:

  • Nutrition: starvation, anorexia, bulimia or frequent vomiting.
  • Diseases of the digestive system: diagnosed digestive or absorption disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease, coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease).
  • Diarrhoea: electrolyte imbalances.
  • .
  • Alcohol abuse: excessive alcohol consumption can lead to electrolyte or nutrient imbalances, and cause - more than usual - magnesium release.
  • Breastfeeding or pregnancy: both factors increase magnesium requirements.
  • .
  • Age: over time, magnesium absorption becomes impaired, putting older people at greater risk of magnesium deficiency.
  • Age: over time, magnesium absorption becomes impaired, putting older people at greater risk of magnesium deficiency.
  • Diabetes: the body may excrete more magnesium in people with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance or high serum glucose levels.
  • Taking certain medications: people taking certain antifungal drugs, diuretics (diuretics), proton pump inhibitors are at greater risk of magnesium deficiency.
  • High physical activity: people who regularly perform workouts, especially endurance workouts, have an increased need for magnesium.
  • .
  • Stress: prolonged mental tension can increase the loss of magnesium from the body, and in turn magnesium deficiency can increase the body's susceptibility to stress, causing a vicious cycle.

How to find out if I have a magnesium deficiency?

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Dr Witold Tomaszewski, M.D., suggests how to diagnose magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium deficiency can be diagnosed.

Measuring serum magnesium concentration is a basic test that is reimbursed by the National Health Fund if you receive a referral from your doctor. It is a good starting point for the diagnosis of magnesium deficiency.

Serum magnesium concentration test.

The serum magnesium concentration test may not, however, be sufficient to diagnose a deficiency. A result with a normal serum magnesium concentration does not imply the absence of a deficiency. 

A broader diagnostic picture may be given by: 

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  • a study of daily magnesium excretion, 
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  • an oral or intravenous magnesium loading test, 
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  • magnesium concentration in erythrocytes, 
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  • muscle biopsy, 
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  • concentration of magnesium in bones and hair,
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  • determination of the ratio of ionised to total magnesium,
  • .

Magnesium excess - symptoms

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Hypermagnesaemia (excess magnesium) is a relatively rare occurrence. It is most likely to occur in people with kidney disease and in people who abuse magnesium supplements.

Symptoms of magnesium excessand:

  • nausea, vomiting,
  • .
  • diarrhoea,
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  • insomnia,
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  • low blood pressure,
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  • heart arrest,
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  • stagnation of urine,
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  • difficulty breathing,
  • .

When there is an excess of magnesium, magnesium supplementation should be stopped in the first place. The doctor may give intravenous calcium gluconate or diuretics to reverse the effects of hypermagnesaemia. Dialysis is sometimes necessary to flush magnesium out of the body.

Sources of magnesium. What products are there magnesium in? 

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The absorption of magnesium from the diet is approximately 50%and. It is present in a wide variety of foods - check out what you like from the list below and eat something rich in magnesium today (but not dark chocolate alone!).

Sleep Well - a dietary supplement for good sleep and calmness .

Sleep Well - dietary supplement for good sleep and tranquillity

.

Sleep Well is a calming and relaxing dietary supplement with the standardised CALMOMIX® complex of herbal extracts and high quality magnesium.

See more
.

Best sources of magnesium from foodand:

  • Wheat bran - 611 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • pumpkin seeds - 550 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • cacao - 499 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • chia seeds (chia seeds) - 330 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • monds - 281 mg/100 g,
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  • barley groats - 270 mg/100 g,
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  • wheat groats - 231 mg/100 g,
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  • peanuts - 168 mg/100 g,
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  • walnuts - 158 mg/100 g,
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  • oatmeal - 130 mg/100 g,
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  • bitter chocolate (min. 70%) - 132/100 g,
  • .
  • fresh spinach - 93 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • dried figs - 67 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • edamame (fresh soybeans) - 61 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • dried dates - 47 mg/100 g,
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  • raisins - 30 mg/100 g,
  • .
  • avocado - 29 mg/100 g,
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  • banana - 27 mg/100 g,
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The source of magnesium is also hard water. It also contains large amounts of other important minerals, such as calcium. Polish waterworks supply medium-hard water to our taps, although current research suggests that some cities have very soft tap water.
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Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorek Clinical nutritionist

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When I read this list myself, some cool recipes for magnesium-rich meals were born in my head. Martha and I have left you with some culinary inspiration at the end of the article.

Daily magnesium requirements

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Nutrition standards for our country indicate the following daily magnesium requirementsand:

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Demographic group

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Magnesium (mg/day)

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Infants

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0-6 months

30 (AI)*

7-11 months

70 (AI)

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Children

1-3 years

80

4-9 years

130

Boys

10-12 years

240

16-18 years

410

Girls

10-12 years

240

16-18 years

360

Males

19-30 years old

400

31+

420

Women

19-30 years old

310

31+

320

Pregnant women

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Under 19 years of age

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400

Above 19 years of age

360

Breastfeeding women

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Under 19 years of age

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360

Above 19 years of age

320

Recommendations shown for infants at AI (Adequate Intake) level and for the rest of the population RDA** (Recommended Dietary Allowance). 

*AI (Adequate Intake)and - sufficient intake is a dietary recommendation used when there is insufficient data to calculate average requirements. 

**RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance)  is an estimate of the amount of vitamins and minerals sufficient to meet the needs of population groups.

Which magnesium is best absorbed?

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You have certainly heard of the bioavailability of a substance. The bioavailability determines the extent to which nutrients from food or supplementation will convert to a form that allows them to be absorbed by the body.

Organic salts.

Organic salts versus inorganic salts

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Our body assimilates organic salts better than inorganic salts. When looking for the best magnesium, check what form it is in in a particular medicine or supplement.

  • Organic saltsand: magnesium citrate, magnesium lactate, magnesium aspartate, magnesium malate.
  • Inorganic saltsand: magnesium oxide, magnesium carbonate, magnesium sulphate.
  • .

Note whether the product contains B vitamins, especially vitamin B6, which helps with magnesium absorption.

Looking for the best magnesium? Check out our ranking of the best magnesium compiled with a pharmacist.

Magnesium chelate - power player or marketing gimmick?

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For several years now, it has been possible to buy dietary supplements with magnesium in chelate form, specifically magnesium diglycinateand. Chelates are substances that consist of 2 amino acid molecules and 1 molecule of a particular mineraland. I have reviewed several scientific studies that have investigated, among other things, the bioavailability of this formand

It cannot be concluded that this form of magnesium is the best absorbed. There is no evidence for this as evident as with citrate, for example. We need to wait for more reliable studies to see exactly how bioavailable chelate is.

Magnesium oxide - a pathway of shame

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Magnesium oxide is very poorly absorbedand. This form of the element has the weakest bioavailability - it is only 4% . Manufacturers use it in their products because it is cheap and light, so it can be put into a single tablet in a large dose. Unfortunately, the content does not translate into bioavailability.

Don't be fooled by marketing slogans about 400 mg  magnesium in one tablet. You won't assimilate that much from a magnesium oxide product. Buy good magnesium in the form of a medicine and use the better forms of this element, such as citrate or lactate.

You already know how to consciously choose magnesium for supplementation. Remember, too, that it is best provided in a varied and nutritious diet. 

Foods full of magnesium - recipes from a nutritionist

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No idea how to cleverly incorporate magnesium into your diet? Check out the inspiration from clinical nutritionist Marta Kaczorek. Simple and tasty - what will you make first? I tested out the recipe for a millet soup - insane and filling!

For the sweet: strawberry cacao lamb banana

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Ingredients:

  • milk groats - 50 g (half a bag),
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  • milk - 250 g (1 cup),
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  • coconut shavings - 6 g (1 tbsp),
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  • good quality cocoa* - 10 g (1 tbsp),
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  • strawberries (or other favourite fruit) - 150 g (approx. 1 cup),
  • .
  • favourite nuts (preferably almonds or walnuts) - 10 g (1 tbsp),
  • .
  • sweetener - as desired,
  • .

*good quality cocoa is natural bitter cocoa, raw, with no added sugar 

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Rinse the millet groats with cold water and cook them in the milk to absorb all the liquid. Towards the end of cooking, add the cocoa, sweetener and mix well. Transfer the mixture into a bowl. You can either add the fruit, chips and nuts to the porridge straight away, or you can blitz half of the strawberries into a mousse and only top with the other toppings.

Dry: green shakshuka 

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Ingredients:

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  • hen's eggs - 150 g (3 M eggs),
  • .
  • whole grain bread - 70 g (2 slices),
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  • cucina - 50 g (⅛ of a large courgette),
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  • canola oil - 10 g (1 tbsp),
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  • apricot - 50 g (⅓ of a medium pepper),
  • .
  • leek - 30 g (⅕ of a medium leek),
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  • spinach - 50 g (2 large handfuls),
  • .
  • Salt, garlic powder, pepper - as desired,
  • .

Heat the oil in a frying pan. Slice the leek and finely dice the peppers and courgette. Add the vegetables to the pan. Fry over a medium heat until the vegetables are soft (about 15 minutes). Season to taste and stir. Add the spinach to the pan. Make indentations in the green mixture and crack the eggs into them. Reduce the heat, cover the pan with a lid and simmer until the eggs are set. (About 5 minutes).

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A quick and rich meal!

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Ingredients:

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  • favourite yoghurt, preferably high protein (skyr, kvarg) - 1 packet,
  • .
  • mountain oat flakes - 40 g (4 tbsp),
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  • wheat bran - 5 g (2 tbsp),
  • .
  • nuts (preferably almonds or walnuts) - 10 g (1 tbsp),
  • .
  • dried fruit (e.g. dates, figs, sultanas) - 5 pieces,
  • .
  • bitter chocolate min. 70% - 3 cubes,
  • .

Mix the bran and oatmeal with the yoghurt/skyr/kvarg. You can add water/milk if you prefer a less thick paste. Add the nuts. You can grate the chocolate cubes or, if you don't have time, break them into pieces. Leave the mixture in the fridge overnight to swell and become pleasantly creamy.

See also: 

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Summary

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I've collected the most frequently asked questions for you regarding magnesium. Find out about this magnesium leaching and what a hangover has to do with it. And if you're reading this article while taking a magnesium bath, then... I've got bad news for you. 

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FAQ

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. How does magnesium deficiency manifest itself?.

The most common symptoms of magnesium deficiency are: muscle tremors and cramps, muscle pain and weakness, tingling and sensory disturbances, feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, arrhythmia, uneven heartbeat, irritability, nervousness, deterioration of mood, sleep problems.

Remember that these symptoms may be indicative of a deficiency in other vitamins, minerals or other nutrients. If symptoms are prolonged or exacerbated, see an internist.

. What happens when you take magnesium every day?.

Magnesium taken daily supports the proper functioning of the nervous, muscular, circulatory systems and strengthens the skeletal system. It reduces inflammation in the body, can promote sleep and improve mood. It also takes an active part in insulin metabolism.

. What is the most magnesium in?.

The following contain the most magnesium: pumpkin seeds, wheat bran, cocoa, chia seeds, almonds, peanuts, walnuts, dried dates, dried figs, barley and buckwheat groats, oatmeal, dark chocolate. Find room in your diet for these foods, which are also rich in other nutrients.

. Does coffee leach magnesium?.

No, coffee does not leach magnesium. Coffee contains magnesium at 3 mg/100 g. Drinking coffee has a diuretic effect, so it affects the accelerated excretion of magnesium. However, if you drink coffee in moderation, hydrate properly and have a varied diet, do not worry about magnesium leaching.

. Can magnesium and potassium be taken together?.

Yes, you can consume magnesium and potassium together. These two minerals have complementary effects - supporting the nervous, cardiovascular and skeletal systems. Magnesium increases the absorption of potassium from the digestive tract. Want to know more about potassium? Read about the role of potassium in the body.

. What leaches magnesium?.

Magnesium is flushed out with frequent consumption of diuretic fluids (coffee, tea, alcohol, herbs). Large amounts of calcium, phosphorus, phytates (in legumes), oxalates (e.g. in spinach) in the diet reduce magnesium absorption.

. Does alcohol leach magnesium?.

Yes, alcohol leaches magnesium. It acts as a diuretic, flushing vitamins and minerals out of the body. Alcohol abuse impairs magnesium absorption and puts us at risk of magnesium deficiency, as well as other important micronutrients.

. Is magnesium good for hangovers?.

Yes, magnesium is good for a hangover when you are dehydrated and feeling unwell. It is best taken in the presence of other vitamins and electrolytes that may have been flushed out by drinking alcohol. Remember that alcohol negatively affects your health.

. Is magnesium absorbed through the skin?.

No, magnesium is not absorbed through the skin and magnesium baths do not work. The magnesium bath salts sold are a marketing ploy. There are no scientific studies to prove that magnesium is absorbed through the skin. Supplement magnesium with a nutritious diet and good magnesium supplements.

. Does magnesium help with cramps?.

Yes, magnesium helps with cramps, especially if we have them due to a deficiency of this element. If you are plagued by cramps, try to implement foods rich in magnesium and potassium into your diet and consider supplementation, preferably after consulting your doctor or pharmacist.

. Can you overdose on magnesium?.

Yes, it is possible to overdose on magnesium and this condition is called hypermagnesaemia. It happens rarely and usually affects people who overuse magnesium supplementation or those with kidney disease. Do not exceed the recommended daily doses and consult your doctor about supplementation if in doubt.

. Does magnesium taken in the evening stimulate you?.

No, magnesium taken in the evening does not stimulate and, on the contrary, can positively affect the quality of our sleep. If you're looking for ways to improve the quality of your sleep, read our article on melatonin for sleep and check out the Sleep Well supplement for good sleep.

. When is the best time to take magnesium?.

Magnesium is best taken after a high-protein meal. Better absorption of magnesium is also influenced by the presence of vitamin B6, vitamin D, lactose, indigestible carbohydrates (e.g. fibre, resistant starch), among others. Supplementation before bedtime is recommended, as magnesium supports the sleep process and may improve the quality of sleep.

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Sources

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Brilla, L. R., & Haley, T. F. (1992). Effect of magnesium supplementation on strength training in humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 11(3), 326-329. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.1992.10718233

Dyckner, T. (1980). Serum Magnesium in Acute Myocardial Infarction. Acta Medica Scandinavica, 207(1-6), 59-66. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0954-6820.1980.tb09676.x

Ebrahimi, E., Motlagh, S. K., Nemati, S., & Tavakoli, Z. (n.d.). Effects of Magnesium and Vitamin B6 on the Severity of Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms. Journal of Caring Sciences, 1(4), Article 4. https://doi.org/10.5681/jcs.2012.026

Golf, S. W., Bender, S., & Grüttner, J. (1998). On the Significance of Magnesium in Extreme Physical Stress. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy, 12(2), 197-202. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1007708918683

Gröber, U. (2019). Magnesium and Drugs. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 20(9), 2094. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20092094

Hall, R. C. W., Hoffman, R. S., Beresford, T. P., Wooley, B., Tice, L., & Klassen Hall, A. (1988). Hypomagnesemia in Patients with Eating Disorders. Psychosomatics, 29(3), 264–272. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0033-3182(88)72362-2

KULLER, L., FARRIER, N., CAGGIULA, A., BORHANI, N., & DUNKLE, S. (1985). RELATIONSHIP OF DIURETIC THERAPY AND SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS AMONG PARTICIPANTS IN THE MULTIPLE RISK FACTOR INTERVENTION TRIAL. American Journal of Epidemiology, 122(6), 1045-1059. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114186

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Mühlbauer, B., Schwenk, M., Coram, W. M., Antonin, K. H., Etienne, P., Bieck, P. R., & Douglas, F. L. (1991). Magnesium-L-aspartate-HCl and magnesium-oxide: Bioavailability in healthy volunteers. European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 40(4), 437-438. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00265863

Office of Dietary Supplements-Magnesium. (n.d.). Retrieved 17 March 2023, from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-Consumer/

Pham, P.-C. T., Pham, P.-A. T., Pham, S. V., Pham, P.-T. T., Pham, P.-M. T., & Pham, P.-T. T. (2014). Hypomagnesemia: A clinical perspective. International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease, 7, 219-230. https://doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S42054

Pickering, G., Mazur, A., Trousselard, M., Bienkowski, P., Yaltsewa, N., Amessou, M., Noah, L., & Pouteau, E. (2020). Magnesium Status and Stress: The Vicious Circle Concept Revisited. Nutrients, 12(12), Article 12. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123672

Pouteau, E., Kabir-Ahmadi, M., Noah, L., Mazur, A., Dye, L., Hellhammer, J., Pickering, G., & Dubray, C. (2018). Superiority of magnesium and vitamin B6 over magnesium alone on severe stress in healthy adults with low magnesemia: A randomized, single-blind clinical trial. PLOS ONE, 13(12), e0208454. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0208454

PubChem. (n.d.). Magnesium glycinate. Retrieved 17 March 2023, from https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/84645

Rivlin, R. S. (1994). Magnesium deficiency and alcohol intake: Mechanisms, clinical significance and possible relation to cancer development (a review). Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 13(5), 416-423. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.1994.10718430

Schuchardt, J. P., & Hahn, A. (n.d.). Intestinal Absorption and Factors Influencing Bioavailability of Magnesium- An Update. Current Nutrition & Food Science, 13(4), 260-278.

Vissers, R. J., & Purssell, R. (1996). Iatrogenic magnesium overdose: Two case reports. Journal of Emergency Medicine, 14(2), 187-191. https://doi.org/10.1016/0736-4679(95)02115-9

Zhang, Y., Xun, P., Wang, R., Mao, L., & He, K. (2017). Can Magnesium Enhance Exercise Performance? Nutrients, 9(9), Article 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9090946

Zhao, B., Deng, H., Li, B., Chen, L., Zou, F., Hu, L., Wei, Y., & Zhang, W. (2020). Association of magnesium consumption with type 2 diabetes and glucose metabolism: A systematic review and pooled study with trial sequential analysis. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 36(3), e3243. https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.3243

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Meet the team
Nina Wawryszuk - Author

Natu.Care Editor

Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

Witold Tomaszewski - Reviewed by

Doctor of Medicine

Verified by an expert

Doctor of Medicine, food and pharmaceutical law expert and experienced medical professional.

Michael Tomaszewski - Edited by

Editor

Michael Tomaszewski

Graduate of Journalism and Artes Liberales at the University of Warsaw. Since 2017, he has been working with the biggest portals in Poland and abroad as an editor. Previously worked for 3 years in one of the leading pharmaceutical companies - he knows the health and beauty industry inside out. In his free time, he most enjoys playing tennis or skiing.

Matthew Podlecki - Fact-checking

Natu.Care Editor

At Natu.Care, she educates about healthy lifestyles and debunks dangerous myths, contrasting them with the results of the latest scientific research. Additionally, she is interested in new technologies and their impact on health and everyday life.

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