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SAD, or seasonal mood depression: how to take care of your mental health then?

Find out how to take care of your own and your loved ones' mental health - during periods of depressed mood and beyond.

Nina Wawryszuk - AuthorAuthorNina Wawryszuk
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AuthorNina Wawryszuk
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Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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Psychologist and social skills trainer. She provides solution-focused therapy.

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SAD, or seasonal mood depression: how to take care of your mental health then?
29 April, 2024
35 min
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The autumn and winter season for many is associated with lowered mood and mental disorders. In the 1980s, such a syndrome of disorders was first described - it was called seasonal affective disorder.

Seasonal affective disorder (seasonal affective disorder, or simply SAD for short) can take the form of autumn and winter depressive episodes, but can just as well occur cyclically at any other time of the year.

When you don't feel like yourself for a few consecutive days, you're in a bad mood and everything around you overwhelms you, don't ignore these symptoms. 

With Jagoda Turowska, an experienced psychologist, we have prepared a compilation of 12 practical and easy-to-follow tips on how to take care of your mental health on a daily basis (not only during periods of depressed mood) and when to seek help from a specialist.

See also:

Tested 12 ways to improve depressed mood

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It's worth consulting a specialist if you're feeling a depressed mood, but at the same time you can try proven ways to improve your mood yourself. Even small lifestyle changes you can make today are helpful - their effectiveness in improving your mood is scientifically proven. 

Below you will find 12 suggestions consulted with psychologist Jagoda Turowska. Where will you start? Let me know in the comment section below the article.

There are 12 suggestions.

1. Find time just for yourself

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You're thinking - how do I find time to relax when my day is rushing by like a Pendolino. Fast-paced mornings, work, responsibilities, unpredictable situations. The body is working at high speed and the mind is accumulating various emotions. You need a reset and an adjustment of the psyche.

Everyone defines rest for themselves. Whether you need a trip to the mountains, an hour-long boxing workout or you want to curl up in a blanket and watch a guilty pleasure film - do something for yourself!

Scientific research suggests that you need to take a break.

Scientific research suggests that people who practice self-care (self-care) have lower stress levels and a better quality of lifeand.

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Many people today put themselves first - and rightly so! Healthy selfishness is very important for our emotional state. It allows us to set our own boundaries and have space for ourselves.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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Tip for today:

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Talk to yourself. Determine what you want to do and when you want to do it. Use this time as you like. Lounge, explore, eat, watch. Don't be late for that date!

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2. Take care of your sleep

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Healthy sleep has a number of mental health (and other) benefits. When we are sleepy, we have a better sense of wellbeing, our memory and concentration improve, we feel more desire and strength to be active (not only physically, but also socially) we reduce our risk of disease (e.g. depression, type II diabetes, hypertension)and.

According to scientists, the average adult should get about 7 hours of sleep. Remember that this is an individual issue and depends on your age, health, activity, or job. 

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How do you know if you are sleeping enough?

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If you fall asleep within about 15-20 minutes of lying down, your sleep is uninterrupted, you wake up rested, and you are not sleepy during the day - this means your body is not lacking sleep. 

The vision above sounds more like... a daydream? Find out what sleep hygiene is and maximise the potential of a night's rest for your body and mind.

Sleep hygiene is a good thing.

Most important principles of sleep hygiene:

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  • Get up and go to bed at the same times.
  • .
  • Avoid naps during the day.
  • .
  • Care to relax and calm down before bed.
  • .
  • Avoid late dinners and excessive fluids before bed.
  • .
  • Avoid blue light (TV, smartphone) two hours before bedtime.
  • .
  • Consume caffeine a maximum of six hours before bedtime.
  • .
  • Do not drink alcohol before bedtime.
  • .
  • Prepare your bedroom for sleep: air out the room, buy a good mattress.
  • .
  • Avoid heavy exercise before bed.
  • .
  • If you are regularly unable to fall asleep or wake up on time, consult your doctor.
  • .

More on natural sleep support and sleep hygiene:

Tip for today:

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Ask the question - do you feel rested? If not, try to go to bed 20 minutes earlier than usual today, for example. You can also organise your day so that you can sleep longer in the morning - e.g. prepare a breakfast in the evening, which you will eat the next day.

Today's Tip.

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3. Try relaxation techniques

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The emotions and tension accumulated during the day need to find an outlet. Accumulating stress can manifest as lowered mood, anxiety, difficulty sleeping, muscle stiffness (e.g. sore neck), digestive problems (e.g. abdominal pain, constipation)and.

Relaxation comes to the rescue, which reduces muscle tension and brings inner calm. You can relax in many ways.

Recommended relaxation techniques:

In the list above, we have added links to free resources from which you can learn and teach the basics of a particular relaxation technique.

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Applying relaxation techniques easily helps to deal with everyday tensions. The perceptible effects of the "here and now" can be noticed almost immediately. The body, on the other hand, needs about two weeks to "get used to" the exercises - then it is much easier to enter a state of relaxation. The prerequisite is, of course, regularity.
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Martyna Ościk.

Martyna OścikIntegrative psychotherapist

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Tip for today:

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Which relaxation technique seems to work best for you? Try at least one of them today. Maybe check out how diaphragmatic breathing works, or do a muscle relaxation session - there are plenty of instructional videos on YouTube.

Today's Tip.

4. Be physically active

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Scientists emphasise that regular exercise can reduce stress, feelings of anxiety and alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. At the same time, movement increases subjective self-esteem and happiness. Importantly, you don't have to throw yourself into the deep end. Physical activity undertaken just twice a week helps to reduce overall stress and tensionand.

Remember that you don't have to opt for running, martial arts, weightlifting or anything you have to work up a sweat at (unless you fancy it!). One of the most underrated activities is... walking. A daily walk of at least 45 minutes reduces fatigue, tension, improves sleep quality, as well as lowering cholesterol and improving cardiovascular healthand

Tip for today:

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Discuss how to incorporate walking into your regular activity. You could extend the route you take to work, surprise your dog with a new path or plan a walk with a loved one at the weekend.

5. Taste your diet for a better mood

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Your dietary choices have a huge impact on your health and wellbeing, with some foods having a particular impact on mental healthand. What is worth including in your diet? I asked nutritionist and personal trainer Marta Kaczorek about this.

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From childhood we are taught about eating 5 portions of fruit and vegetables, but how many of us stick to this important recommendation? For a good start, it's worth learning to add these foods to every meal.
Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorek clinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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Consume foods that are full of valuable vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and can support the production of serotonin - the "happiness hormone". 

Include in the menuand:

  • eggs,
  • .
  • nuts and seeds,
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  • fish (e.g. salmon, mackerel, herring),
  • .
  • bitter chocolate (minimum 70% cocoa content),
  • .
  • bananas, 
  • .
  • berries,
  • berries
  • meat,
  • .
  • strings,
  • .
  • fermented products (e.g. kimchi, kefir, sauerkraut),
  • .
  • oat flakes,
  • green vegetables.
  • green vegetables (e.g. broccoli, spinach),
  • .
  • whole grain products,
  • .

What do all these products have in common? They are all called mood food and contain vitamins, minerals and other valuable ingredients for wellbeing and mental wellbeingand.

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Scientific research suggests that people who follow a diet high in processed foods and sugar are more likely to experience stress. In addition, chronic stress can lead to overeating, which has a negative impact on our health and well-being.
Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorek clinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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"Combining high-protein foods with carbohydrate foods in a meal is the ideal recipe for increasing serotonin in the body," adds the nutritionist.

Tip for today:

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Get enough fruit and vegetables in your diet. Perhaps you fancy trying something new - Chinese beans or kiwano? Add it to your shopping list or pack your favourite fruit for tomorrow and... treat someone!"

Today's Tip!

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6. Try to cut down on stimulants

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Alcohol, nicotine and other stimulants are your toxic enemies that debilitate your body and psyche. Scammers who pretend to be essential to you (relaxing, reducing tension), while behind your back they ruin your health and well-beingand.

Nicotine and other chemicals in cigarette smoke alter pathways in the brain associated with anxiety and negatively affect the nervous system .

Frequent drinking of alcohol disrupts the balance of neurotransmitters that may be responsible for mental health. This toxic interference shatters harmony in the nervous system and can lead to symptoms of anxiety, for example. Alcohol also negatively affects sleep quality and recoveryand.

A 2017 review of scientific studies found that reducing alcohol consumption can improve mood and alleviate symptoms of anxiety and depression .

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Tip for today:

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Take a look at the stimulants in your life. Do you smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol frequently? Do you want to quit these addictions? Think about how you could be in better shape physically and mentally by this time next year. Give yourself a chance. Read below where to find help.

7. Listen to your body's needs - consider supplementation

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Some vitamins and minerals play a special role in the body's response to stress and mood regulation. A deficiency in one or more nutrients can affect your mental health and ability to cope with stressand.

For proper nervous system function, mood regulation and stress resilience, the following are key:

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Have you checked for vitamin and mineral deficiencies in your body? Their deficiency can manifest as lowered mood and fatigue!

Additionally, research suggests that some dietary supplements may help to reduce stress, increase resistance to stress and improve mood. Popular products includeand:

  • ashwagandha,
  • .
  • mountain rhodiola,
  • .
  • saffron,
  • .
  • passionflower herb,
  • .
  • SAM (S-Adenosylmethionine),
  • .
  • 5-HTP,
  • .

Tip for today:

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When was the last time you had your blood tested and checked your morphology, lipidogram, hormones and potential deficiencies? Sign up with your doctor for a referral and check the state of your body. This will help you detect any abnormalities quickly. 

8. Recognise, name and accept emotions

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We all know it, even if we don't know exactly what 'okay' means. Do we really feel 'okay' most of the time?"

There are many more emotions inside us than we think. Excitement, shame, pride, fear, satisfaction, grief - to name just a few.

It's not a bad thing.

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In my practice I work with many people who do not give themselves permission to feel their emotions. It is particularly distressing when I hear that "crying is weakness". On the contrary. Crying is a strength that helps us to clear many emotions and reduces anger or experiencing sadness.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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According to scientistsemotional awarenessand:

  • facilitates self-regulation of emotions, 
  • .
  • improves ability to navigate complex social situations,
  • .
  • improves social relationships,
  • .
  • positively affects physical and mental health,
  • .

Are you able to identify your emotions and understand their source?"

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In one session with a patient, she told me that she was constantly crying and didn't know why. After a few meetings she realised herself that this crying was sadness, anger and frustration, but also a form of going through grief after her partner had passed away
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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"Once we have recognised the emotions that cause the crying, we learn to accept them. Then it's easier for us to let them go and release them," she adds.

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Tip:

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Discern why you are feeling certain emotions at any given time and look for the reasons. Maybe you feel fear and underneath that emotion is insecurity? Are you clinging and argumentative, and what you really need is attention? Recognise, name, accept.

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9. Do something nice for someone

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Scientific research suggests that kindness to others can contribute to our wellbeing. Small gestures and words interact with people. It could be a sincere compliment, appreciating someone's work or highlighting a feature that is important to usand.

Do you praise a colleague for clear presentations? Do you appreciate a colleague who helps you catch up in class? And does your child know how you burst with pride when they bravely learn to tie their shoes?"

Would you consider taking part?

It is worth considering volunteering. We can offer our invaluable help on an ad hoc or long-term basis to an organisation we want to support. This could include helping to organise a clothing collection, walking dogs at a shelter, sharing a meal at Christmas with a lonely elderly person. Take a look at the website of the National Network of Volunteer Centres.

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Tip for today:

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Talk in person, call or write to someone and thank them for something that made you happy thanks to that person.

10 Reduce social media and information overload

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Vibrations, buzzes, notification sounds. We are overstimulated. We wait anxiously for a text message, for a news story, for results, for a sensation. We refresh, post, send hearts.

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Smartphones, tablets and computers have made our lives much easier. Social media have helped to find old and make new friends, find inspiration, and pass on knowledge. However, making skilful use of these inventions is now quite a challenge.

Scientists suggest that excessive smartphone use is linked to increased stress levels and mental health disordersand

Spending too much time in front of screens is associated with poorer mental wellbeing and increased stress levels in both adults and children.

By looking at idealised photos or videos of other people, we automatically compare ourselves with them. According to researchers, this can lead to lower self-satisfaction, lower self-esteem, and even the development of depression and anxietyand.

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Check in your app how much time you spend in it each day. Try to limit your stay in the virtual world from week to week. If contact with social media content is not edifying for you and you feel unwell - log out.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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Also, exposure to blue light (which is emitted by TV screens, smartphones) can negatively affect sleep. And poorer sleep, as you already know, can also lead to increased stress levelsand.

Tip for today:

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Minimum one hour before bed, mute and put down your smartphone, turn off the TV and take care of yourself. Try the relaxation I wrote about above or just appreciate the moment for yourself.

Take a moment for yourself.

See also:

11 Show gratitude

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Scientific research has shown that showing gratitude can have a significant impact on our sense of hope and happiness, improve mood and have overall mental health benefitsand

How to practice gratitude? As you start each day, just after you wake up, or when you brush your teeth or eat breakfast, try to think of one thing for which you are grateful.

During the day, also pay attention to the pleasant things that happen to you. It could be the sunny weather, a tasty cake from a colleague at work or the kind gentleman who let you through in the queue at the shop.

Throughout the day, try to think of one thing you are grateful for.

With a little practice, you will become more aware of the positive things around you, which will benefit your wellbeing.

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Gratitude is often understood as an emotion we feel towards others. However, we should be mindful of gratitude towards ourselves. For example, we may feel gratitude for having forgiven another person, thus taking care of our mental wellbeing.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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Tip for today:

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Pause reading the article for a moment and think about what good things have happened to you today or what you are grateful for. Try to practice gratitude on a daily basis and you will definitely feel good more often.

Gratitude.

You can also be inspired by the video Meditation - Feel Gratitude from Anna Gorska, psychologist and mindfulness coach.

12. Spend time with loved ones

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Cultivating relationships with others has a positive impact on our mental health and mood. Support from others, but also being supportive to someone boosts self-esteem and has a positive impact on moodand.

"And how do you find friends at 30+?", a friend once asked me, showing me a meme with this theme.

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Finding friends when we are adults is possible, although more difficult - if only because of less time or more distrust. If we start hanging out with other people, over time we will find someone with whom we are on the same wavelength, understand the same jokes or just enjoy spending time with.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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William Butler Yeats, the Irish poet said:

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There are no strangers here; Only friends you have not yet met.

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It's worth going out to meet people: getting to know the neighbours next door, finding out who runs regularly on the treadmill in the area, or signing up to a community, such as a gym or the Old Cinema Admirers club. 

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To make relationships, you need to open up to other people. The rest should come out naturally. Let's also use the good parts of social media - themed groups, online forums.

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- adds the psychologist.

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Let's not forget about the animals! Many scientific studies confirm the positive effects of pet ownership on mental well-beingand. If for various reasons you can't own one, you can become a volunteer!

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Tip for today:

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Schedule an appointment, make a phone call, write a message to someone you haven't had a chance to talk to in a while. You can also groom your pet or take them for a walk. Maybe you can meet another couple to take a walk together?

How to care for someone whose mood is lowered?

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You already know how to take care of yourself. But what do you do when you notice depression in someone else? You want to help, but you don't know how. You don't want to harm, 'dob in' or unwittingly detract from someone else's suffering. Fortunately, you don't have to be a therapist to give someone the support they need.

Three important principles are key:

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1. Don't judge; 

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Everyone experiences suffering in their own way, even one that we may not understand. Allow others to experience emotions without judging, without comparing, without belittling.

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What to say?

  • I can see that you are very sad about this situation.
  • .
  • You can cry if you feel the need to do so. I am here.
  • .
  • You can tell me what is bothering you, I will listen to you.
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  • You have the right to feel this way.
  • .
  • It is normal to be in despair.
  • .

Don't say that.

  • Others have it worse, don't worry. Find something to do.
  • There used to be no time to cry, everyone would pick themselves up and grit their teeth.
  • There was no time to cry.
  • Look at it logically, it's not a drama.
  • .
  • You're being oversensitive, come on, there's nothing to worry about.
  • .
  • Find yourself an activity, it will make you forget about the sadness.
  • .

2. Listen.

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Some people can be helped by talking and getting their problems out. It is important to let someone tell the story, without interrupting, judging, commenting or giving advice when that person is not asking for it. When someone has difficulty formulating thoughts, you can ask simple support questions.

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What to say?

  • I am here to listen to you.
  • .
  • I'm glad you're telling me.
  • I'm here to listen to you.
  • I hear how sad and difficult you feel. How long have you been feeling this for?"
  • .
  • When you say this, I understand you better. Thank you.
  • I already understand why you have been in a sad mood lately.
  • Thank you.

Don't say that.

  • Other people have it worse, don't worry.
  • I have it worse.
  • I have it worse  than you, listen to this...!
  • .
  • It used to be that there was no time to cry, everyone would pick themselves up and grit their teeth.
  • There was no time to cry.
  • Find something to do, then you'll forget about the problem.
  • .
  • We all have some problems, you have to cope.
  • .

3. Highlight your presence. 

Some people find it difficult to ask for support, so reassurance that we are there beside them and will help is uplifting to the person who is suffering.

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What to say?

  • I am here and happy to help you. What can I do for you?
  • Would you like to seek help together? 
  • .
  • We can do it together - we will come up with a plan on how to help you.
  • We can do it together.
  • How can I lighten your load?
  • .
  • We can agree that in a difficult moment, text me and I'll call you back.
  • We can make a plan to help you.

Don't say that.

  • I will help you, but enough is enough. Let's not talk about it.
  • Just don't write and call me now.
  • I'm not going to help you.
  • I'm heartbroken, I don't know what to say to you. I'm scared.

How else to show support?

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  1. Hug. If the situation and relationship allow it, don't be afraid to give a hug, which according to researchers can have a calming effect and help you cope better with stressand.
  2. Help your partner.
  3. Plan an activity together. Take a walk in the woods, watch your favourite comedy, cheer, pool, or sign up for an interesting workshop .
  4. .
  5. Recognise. If the person has the desire and strength, ask them to do something for you that they are good at. Perhaps she is great as a handyman? Does he or she have a sense of style and know how to advise you when buying furniture? Ask for help - let this person know they are needed and importantand.
  6. .
  7. Support seeking help. Ask exactly what you can help with. This might include cooking dinner for a few days or finding a contact for a recommended psychiatristand.
  8. .
  9. Share the knowledge. Tell the person about the 12 tips from this article. And maybe you can start applying them togetherand?
  10. .

When to see a specialist for help?

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Prolonged depressed mood and an increasing number of distressing symptoms that significantly reduce quality of life are a signal to ask for help.

See a specialist if:

  • unpleasant symptoms persist for a long time (more than 2 weeks),
  • .
  • their intensity increases,
  • .
  • you find it difficult to make decisions and carry out daily tasks (e.g. personal hygiene, going to work),
  • .
  • you do not enjoy activities that you used to enjoy,
  • .
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We should seek help when we begin to experience distress that makes it difficult or impossible to function on a daily basis. Especially when external circumstances do not correspond with how we feel. It is possible to be 'king of the world' on paper and still not enjoy life.
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Marcin Zarzycki.

Marcin Zarzycki physician

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"The diagnosis of a depressive episode can be made after 2 weeks of change in the patient's functioning. It is important to emphasise that one of the possible symptoms to make the diagnosis is depressed mood, however, contrary to appearances, this is not the only symptom, or even does not have to occur at all."  adds the doctor.

Doctor.

Symptoms that should worry us

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If you are experiencing the following symptoms, seek help from a specialist (you will also read about this below). An early diagnosis of the problem is a chance of a quicker return to mental balance.

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Symptoms that may indicate developing mental health problemsand:

  • feeling of tension, anxiety, sadness, confusion, forgetfulness, irritability, anger, fear,
  • .
  • feelings of hopelessness, helplessness or confusion,
  • .
  • constant arguments with other people,
  • .
  • mood swings that destabilise daily activities,
  • .
  • unpleasant thoughts that you cannot get out of your head,
  • .
  • feeling tired even with sufficient sleep
  • .
  • feeling emotionally numb or lacking empathy
  • .
  • experiencing unexplained body pains or hypersensitivity
  • .
  • hearing voices in the head that cannot be stopped,
  • .
  • thoughts of hurting oneself or other people,
  • .
  • inability to carry out daily activities and duties,
  • a lack of ability to do so.
  • changes in appetite - under-eating or overeating,
  • .
  • sleep disturbance, insomnia, excessive sleepiness,
  • .
  • distancing from other people and favourite activities,
  • .
  • frequent use of stimulants (alcohol, drugs, nicotine),
  • .

Depression versus despondency

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Depression of mood happens to all of us and is completely normal. We have the right to have a worse day, when we don't want to do anything and would prefer to stay at home in our pyjamas.

How to deal with it.

What are the differences between depression and despondency?

. . .
 

Depression

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Chandra

High emotions

Anxiety, sadness, feelings of inferiority, guilt

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Decreased mood

Decreased mood.

insomnia, sleep disorders

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May occur

.

Not present

Flashes of positive thoughts and hope for a better tomorrow

Not present

Happen

Duration of symptoms

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More than 2 weeks

From a few hours to a few days

Thoughts: suicidal, about self-harm, about hurting someone

They occur

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Not present

Psychomotor energy

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Significant reduction in desire for action, work, activity, movement

Preserved - person will allow themselves to be persuaded to go to a meeting, does not give up activity

Personal hygiene

.

Can be neglected

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Not neglected

Social activity

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Withdrawal, avoidance of contacts

Preserved

Apetite

Aversion to food or overeating

Normal

Autumn or winter despondency are misleading statements. We can experience despondency - a lowering of mood - all year round, so if you're experiencing summer or spring despondency (although that sounds strange, doesn't it?) that's normal too.

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A mental health professional can help you deal with your lowered mood and will be able to diagnose whether it is a temporary condition or depression. It is worth seeking support, as a lowered mood can be improved and inner peace restored. However, it is first necessary to find the causes in order to determine the best path to inner healing for us.
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Katarzyna Rutkowska.

Katarzyna Rutkowskapsychologist and psychotherapist, Clinical Team Supervisor at Mindgram

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Internet free testing

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On the internet you can take a free psychological test, which can provide an indication (not a diagnosis) of what mental state we are in.

The Beck Depression Scale is a self-report scale and is used to screen for symptoms of depression in yourself. You only need to answer 21 questions to receive a score. The test is not a substitute for an examination with a specialist, but it will give you some insight into your condition.

Take the test

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Where to find help?

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Healthcare facilities on the National Health Service

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You can see a psychologist or see a psychiatrist directly through the Mental Health Outpatient Clinic.

  • To see a psychologist you need a referral, except during an epidemic or epidemic emergency (in which case it is not required). A referral to a psychologist can be issued to you by, for example, your family doctor.
  • To a psychologist you need a referral.
  • To a psychiatrist you do not need a referral
  • .

Find a suitable counselling centre close to your home.

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You can also register with the Mental Health Centre, which is responsible for psychiatric and psychological support for all people in the area.

Check if you can find a Mental Health Centre in your area.

Private facilities and surgeries

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You do not need a referral for a fee-paying appointment, but it may be an indication of the specialist. You can make an appointment at a private practice in person, by phone or conveniently online.

Check the availability of specialists in your area.

Telephone helplines

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The following is a list of phone numbers you can call for support in a mental health crisis. You can read more about them (mission, what times they operate) by clicking on the name.

If you are finding it difficult to get over the embarrassment or fear of seeing a specialist in person, and you feel your condition warrants it - talking on the phone is an important first step.

Why talk on the helpline?"

  • The conversation is anonymous - you don't need to give out your details.
  • There is no need to give out your details.
  • Most helplines are free of charge.
  • There is no charge to you.
  • You don't have personal contact - you can talk from a safe, comfortable place.
  • They are free.
  • Without being able to see the caller, it may be easier for you to tell them about your problems.
  • .
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Before you call the helpline, write down what you want to talk about and ask. You'll reduce the stress of the conversation and make sure you talk through all your questions and concerns
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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Treatment of mental health problems - what forms of therapy are there and what to expect

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Treating a patient with mental health problems is aimed at: 

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  • identifying the causes of problems,
  • .
  • reducing symptoms, 
  • .
  • improving wellbeing and functioning,
  • .

The most effective treatment is a combination of the following methods, as a multifaceted approach produces the best results.

Treatment methods

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Psychotherapy - treatment through conversation

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The psychotherapist is concerned with working through with the patient the escalating problems and difficulties that cause mental and somatic disorders. Psychotherapy is conducted according to a specific method and is always part of a therapeutic plan, i.e. an established treatment planand.

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In Poland, there is no law on the profession of psychotherapist, so before starting therapy, it is advisable to check their credibility (education, qualifications). The specialist should be certified by the Polish Association of Psychotherapy.

The specialist should be certified by the Polish Association of Psychotherapy.

Pharmacotherapy - drug support

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A psychiatrist doctor is qualified to assess the mental and physical aspects of psychological problems. He or she is qualified to prescribe medication to treat psychological problemsand.

After diagnosing a particular patient's problem, the psychiatrist prescribes the appropriate medication, recommends the medication regimen and the duration of pharmacotherapy.

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Support groups

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Group therapy is a supportive and treatment-supportive activity aimed at restoring mental and emotional balance. It involves meeting in a group of people with the same or similar problems and talking under the guidance of a qualified professional (such as a psychotherapist)and.

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Group therapy gives the patient a sense that they are not alone and other people are also experiencing difficulties. This awareness combined with interpersonal interactions and sharing of experiences are incredibly powerful in therapy.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

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Hospital treatment

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Inpatient treatment for mental health and addiction problems can be provided byand:

  • daily psychiatric stay - 5 hours a day, 5 days a week, therapeutic services and programmes are provided for a defined period of time: necessary diagnostic tests, medication and food, educational and consultative activities for families;
  • .
  • stationary - stay in a psychiatric hospital;
  • .
  • reception rooms - around the clock at any hospital with a psychiatric ward, you can benefit from emergency services;
  • .
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The treatment of depression should be based on a holistic approach in which a psychiatrist and a psychotherapist work together. If the doctor decides to include pharmacotherapy, this is always the result of an individual assessment of the benefits of such a decision.
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Marcin Zarzycki.

Marcin Zarzycki doctor

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"Many people are concerned about taking 'chemotherapy'. Research and patient experience suggest that most side effects - if they occur at all - are transient and do not result in withdrawal of the drug. The drugs used also do not change the personality - their mechanism of action is based solely on regulating and restoring brain mechanisms to normal," the doctor adds.

Working on yourself and changing your lifestyle

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As Jagoda Turowska points out, in the fight for our psychological wellbeing, it is important to work on ourselves - not only in the therapist's office - and to change our lifestyle, i.e. to implement positive habits into our daily routine.

The following is an example of this.

Gradual implementation of the tips from this article is a good start.

How to overcome the fear of seeing a specialist?

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I've heard more than once that going to a psychiatrist is a shame... and is it a shame to go to a cardiologist or a gastrointestinal specialist for treatment? The brain is an organ like any other and mental illness, like any illness, can lead to death.
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Jagoda Turowska.

Jagoda TurowskaPsychologist and social skills trainer

.
.

A visit to a psychiatrist will not automatically lead to a stay in a psychiatric hospital (as many people fear). More and more people are seeking the help of a psychiatrist to improve their mental and physical condition.

People are seeking help not only for patients with depression or schizophrenia, but also for people in prolonged bereavement, with neurosis, low self-esteem, or unable to cope with stress.

Thank you for reading the article. I would like you to share it with someone close to you and still try to implement one tip today. Do something for yourself or help another person.

Summary

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.
  • Experiencing a lowered mood is natural.
  • There is evidence of a lowered mood.
  • There are scientifically proven ways to improve your mood that you can put into practice today.
  • Seasonal low mood is natural.
  • Seasonal lowered mood affects many people, regardless of the specific time of year.
  • There are ways to improve your mood.
  • The key to regaining mental balance is rapid intervention by yourself (e.g. spotting the problem, naming it and acting on it) or a specialist (treatment, therapy).
  • Prolonged depressed mood can be a symptom of developing mental health problems.
  • .
  • You are not alone in this - according to scientists, everyone will experience a mental health crisis at some point in their lives.
  • Mental health problems can be treated, and with a diagnosis you can live and function with personal and professional fulfilment.

Everything you wanted to know about mental disorders but were afraid to ask

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FAQ

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. Is it possible to live normally with depression.

Yes, it is possible to live and function with depression. A combination of pharmacological treatment with the help of a psychiatrist, therapy with a psychotherapist and working on oneself brings the best results and enables one to be fulfilled both professionally and privately.

. How many people have depression?.

According to WHO data, more than 280 million people worldwide have depression. These are the people we know about. It is difficult to estimate how many others are suffering without a diagnosis. Depression is a deadly disease that is developing in more and more people every year. It is a serious problem and should not be underestimated.

. Do antidepressants change personality?.

No, antidepressants do not change personality. This is an unfounded fear that may discourage some people from seeking drug treatment. Appropriate therapy can make it easier to act (e.g. actively participate in life) as a result of reducing negative thoughts and feelings. However, medication prescribed by doctors does not affect personality.

. Is it possible to cure depression?.

Depression is a recurrent illness. This means that depressive episodes can occur many times during a lifetime. If left untreated, depression can last for years, even for the rest of one's life. There is no single cure for depression, but there are many treatment options, all of which can reduce symptoms and minimise their impact on daily life.

. Do antidepressants need to be taken for life?

No, this is a myth. It is not necessary to take antidepressants for life. The type of medication, duration of treatment and withdrawal regimen is decided by the doctor based on the individual case. The best results are achieved with a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy.

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Resources

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Meet the team
Nina Wawryszuk - Author

Natu.Care Editor

Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

Berry Turowska - Reviewed by

Psychologist

Verified by an expert

Psychologist and social skills trainer. She provides solution-focused therapy.

Michael Tomaszewski - Edited by

Editor

Michael Tomaszewski

Graduate of Journalism and Artes Liberales at the University of Warsaw. Since 2017, he has been working with the biggest portals in Poland and abroad as an editor. Previously worked for 3 years in one of the leading pharmaceutical companies - he knows the health and beauty industry inside out. In his free time, he most enjoys playing tennis or skiing.

Julia Wrzosinska - Fact-checking

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