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A good probiotic for irritable bowel, leaky gut and diverticulosis

Find out how probiotics can help you with intestinal ailments.

Emilia Moskal - AuthorAuthorEmilia Moskal
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Natu.Care Editor

Emilia Moskal specialises in medical and psychological texts, including content for medical entities. She is a fan of simple language and reader-friendly communication. At Natu.Care, she writes educational articles.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed byReviewed byIlona Bush
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Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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A good probiotic for irritable bowel, leaky gut and diverticulosis
29 April, 2024
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A bloated abdomen, belching, gas, and on top of that constipation or persistent diarrhoea. Intestinal complaints can be a real pain (or rather... stomach?). Probiotics can be your salvation, but there are a few things to watch out for.

Living probiotic bacteria are microscopic but very important inhabitants of your intestines. They improve their peristalsis, aid digestion, are the bane of pathogenic microorganisms and, according to some studies, can even reduce inflammation in the body. But strain, to strain is unequal.

That's why, before you reach for the first probiotic product on the market, read up on which probiotics can help you with certain gut ailments and how to take them to be safe.

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From this article you will learn:

  • What to look for when choosing a probiotic.
  • What to look for when choosing a probiotic.
  • Which strains work best for intestinal ailments.
  • Which strains work best for intestinal ailments.
  • With which conditions probiotics can be useful.
  • .
  • How to supplement your diet with natural probiotics.
  • .
  • Whether there are contraindications to the use of probiotics.
  • .

See also:

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Which probiotic for the gut to choose?

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Choosing the right probiotic for the gut can be crucial to improving your health and wellbeing. There are a number of factors to consider when choosing a probiotic product. The most important of these are:

  • types of bacterial strains, 
  • .
  • the number of live cultures of the microorganisms, 
  • .
  • appropriate designation of probiotic bacteria,
  • .
  • form of administration,
  • .

Magister of Pharmacy Ilona Krzak adds:

"According to studies, mixtures of strains have a higher efficacy in preventing constipation and combating IBS symptoms compared to single-strain probiotics, as the effects of multi-strain probiotics can be complementary or synergistic.

These are the same as single-strain probiotics.

However, this does not mean that the preparation has to have 10 different strains, because the more, the better. It is about a few different strains (4-5), not half of a microbiology laboratory. On top of that, the type of strain also matters.

In the case of IBS, it is also important whether the formula contains FODMAPs, i.e. fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (usually referred to as prebiotics), which can exacerbate the discomfort of IBS."

Types of bacterial strains

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The different strains of probiotic bacteria have different benefits for gut health. The most important of these are Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces yeast. 

Lactobacillus acidophilus is one of the most common probiotic bacteria species that helps digest lactose and can alleviate symptoms of lactose intolerance. It may also help prevent and treat diarrhoeaand.

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Compared to many other probiotics L. acidophilus it has better resistance to both acids and bile salts. These characteristics facilitate the survival and proliferation of L. acidophilus in the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract.
Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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  1. acidophilus has multiple effects on the human body, including nutritional effects, regulating the balance of intestinal flora, strengthening immunity, delaying ageing and anti-cancer, and supporting cholesterol reduction.
  2. acidophilus is divided into many types of strains, including L. acidophilus LA-1LA-5NCFM and ATCC4356DDS-1 - adds pharmacist.
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Bifidobacterium longum is known to help maintain healthy intestinal flora and may alleviate symptoms of irritable bowel syndromeand.

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Supplementation of both L. paracasei and B. longum improves quality of life in terms of emotional well-being and social functioning. L. paracasei and B. longum may reduce the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms and improve the psychological well-being of people with certain subtypes of IBS.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that is particularly effective in preventing and treating antibiotic-related diarrheaand.

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Saccharomyces boulardii effectively supplements the treatment of acute gastrointestinal diseases such as diarrhoea or chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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"So far, this is the only yeast used as a probiotic, and its properties are supported by scientific evidence from the strain S. boulardii CNCM I-745 (or S. boulardii Hansen CBS 5926). Nevertheless, the efficacy of these strains cannot be translated to others, such as S. boulardii CNCM 1079" - explains magister of pharmacy.

Pharmacist Ilona Krzak lists a few more beneficial bacterial species for the intestinal flora:

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"Lactobacillus plantarum is a well-studied strain. L. plantarum 299v benefits IBS patients, mainly by normalising stools and relieving abdominal pain, which significantly improves the quality of life of IBS patients. In addition, consumption of L. plantarum 299v prevents diarrhoea in patients treated with antibiotics. It also improves iron absorption.

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It has a high tolerance to both low pH in the stomach and high pH resulting from bile salts in the duodenum. It can also inhibit the growth of potentially pathogenic bacteria.

Bacteria.

Bifidobacterium breve BR03 reduces the proliferation of bacteria E.coli and has positive results in preventing colic in children. Preliminary studies show that this strain can reduce allergic response."

Other probiotic species recommended for the gut:

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  • Lactobacillus gasseri
  • .
  • Lactobacillus coryniformis
  • .
  • Lactobacillus casei
  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus
  • Lactobacillus reuteri
  • Enterococcus faecalis
  • .

Number of viable microbial cultures

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Another factor to look at is the number of live bacteria in a probiotic, usually expressed in colony-forming units (CFU - colony-forming unit). Most effective probiotics should contain at least one billion CFUs per doseand.

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Probiotics in food must contain at least 10⁶ CFU/g of live and active microorganisms, while freeze-dried supplements show good results when consuming 10 ⁷ to 10 ¹¹ live microorganisms per day.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Probiotic bacteria designation

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Before you decide on a particular preparation, look at its composition. Probiotic bacteria should be labelled with a three-member name and include the species (e.g. Bifidobacterium), genus (e.g. lactis) and usually a numerical-letter indication of the specific strain (e.g. BS01).

The last part of the designation is particularly important, due to the fact that the particular properties of probiotics may vary slightly depending on the specific strainand.

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Probiotics can be used alone or combined with each other, although it should be noted that not all combinations are sustainable and different strains of the same probiotic bacterium may have different abilities or enzymatic activity, even if they belong to the same species. Probiotic properties vary considerably between species, strains and even between strain variants.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Form of application

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The effectiveness of a probiotic also depends on how many beneficial bacteria are able to reach and colonise the gut. For this to happen, as many of them as possible must survive the journey through the digestive system. Probiotics are best protected by capsules in coated shells, which protect the valuable microorganisms from the acidic environment of the stomach.

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While some probiotics can become part of the microbiome, others simply pass through the gastrointestinal tract and modulate the existing microbiome or affect it before leaving the body.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Probiotic drug or supplement - which to choose?

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The basic difference between a drug and a dietary supplement is that the former is used to treat a particular ailment, while the latter is a supplement to our diet. Probiotic in the form of a drug must contain a certain number of bacterial or yeast cultures and have a research-proven effect. On top of this, it is subject to quality control even after release. In the case of a food supplement, there are no such requirements.

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Most probiotic preparations available on the market are dietary supplements. Therefore, it is worth reading the product description carefully, checking the designation of the bacterial strains and seeing if the manufacturer can boast studies on the purity of the formulation or efficacy. The best dietary supplement manufacturers also offer quality products that can effectively support your health.

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Probiotics necessarily in the fridge?

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Many people reflexively put probiotics in the fridge. However, this practice is not always recommended. Some preparations are formulated so that the bacteria do best at room temperature, i.e. between 15-25°C. Before storing the preparation in the fridge, check the manufacturer's storage recommendations. These can be found on the packaging or in the leaflet.

Best probiotic for the gut - ranking

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Probiotic for the gut for adults:

  • ALLDEYNN ROSEBIOTIC
  • .
  • Dr.Jacob's Iodine + Selenium probio
  • .
  • Panaseus Formula for the gut
  • .
  • Sanprobi IBS
  • .
  • Asecurin IB
  • .

Gut starch for children and babies:

  • Multilac Baby Synbiotic
  • .
  • Polpharma Acidolac
  • .
  • APTEO probiotic in drops
  • .
  • Vivomixx Microcapsules
  • .
  • Joy Day Probiotics Forest Fruits
  • .

6 bacterial strains

ALLDEYNN ROSEBIOTIC

ALLDEYNN ROSEBIOTIC
5.0
  • Main ingredients: Lab2pro™ 6 strainsóof lactic acid bacteria
  • .
  • Form: pastilles
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  • Packaging: 30 lozenges
  • .
  • Dosage: 1 lozenge per day
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 30 days
  • .
Product description

ROSEBIOTIC is a synbiotic containing a patented Lab2pro™ complex of 6 selected and tested strainsóof lactic acid bacteria. Synbiotic – is a combination of a prebiotic and a probiotic in one product. The product has a positive effect on supporting and strengthening the immune system, improving digestion, as well as the bioavailability of vitamins and mineralsóin the digestive tract.

Recommended dietary supplement when you want to rebuild the state of your intestinal microflora, regulate the digestive system and improve the absorption of nutrients.

Pros and cons

ROSEBIOTIC is a synbiotic containing a patented Lab2pro™ complex of 6 selected and tested strainsóof lactic acid bacteria. Synbiotic – is a combination of a prebiotic and a probiotic in one product. The product has a positive effect on supporting and strengthening the immune system, improving digestion, as well as the bioavailability of vitamins and mineralsóin the digestive tract.

Recommended dietary supplement when you want to rebuild the state of your intestinal microflora, regulate the digestive system and improve the absorption of nutrients.

Additional information

ROSEBIOTIC is a synbiotic containing a patented Lab2pro™ complex of 6 selected and tested strainsóof lactic acid bacteria. Synbiotic – is a combination of a prebiotic and a probiotic in one product. The product has a positive effect on supporting and strengthening the immune system, improving digestion, as well as the bioavailability of vitamins and mineralsóin the digestive tract.

Recommended dietary supplement when you want to rebuild the state of your intestinal microflora, regulate the digestive system and improve the absorption of nutrients.

Expert opinion

ROSEBIOTIC is a synbiotic containing a patented Lab2pro™ complex of 6 selected and tested strainsóof lactic acid bacteria. Synbiotic – is a combination of a prebiotic and a probiotic in one product. The product has a positive effect on supporting and strengthening the immune system, improving digestion, as well as the bioavailability of vitamins and mineralsóin the digestive tract.

Recommended dietary supplement when you want to rebuild the state of your intestinal microflora, regulate the digestive system and improve the absorption of nutrients.

Helps the thyroid

Dr.Jacob's Iodine + Selenium probio

Dr.Jacob's Iodine + Selenium probio
4.8
  • Active ingredients: vitamin B12iodineselenium, silicon, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria
  • .
  • Form: capsules
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  • Packaging: 90 capsules
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 3 months
  • .
Product description

Iodine + Selenium probio dietary supplement is a combination of iodine, selenium, vitamin B12 and probioticós. The product formula is designed to support thyroid health and normal intestinal flora. 

Iodine and selenium are key micronutrients essential for proper thyroid function. In turn, millions of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium lactis, help to maintain a healthy intestinal environment. 

The following is a supplementary vitamin.

Additionally, vitamin B12 supports normal energy metabolism and the nervous system. The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

Pros and cons

Iodine + Selenium probio dietary supplement is a combination of iodine, selenium, vitamin B12 and probioticós. The product formula is designed to support thyroid health and normal intestinal flora. 

Iodine and selenium are key micronutrients essential for proper thyroid function. In turn, millions of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium lactis, help to maintain a healthy intestinal environment. 

The following is a supplementary vitamin.

Additionally, vitamin B12 supports normal energy metabolism and the nervous system. The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

Additional information

Iodine + Selenium probio dietary supplement is a combination of iodine, selenium, vitamin B12 and probioticós. The product formula is designed to support thyroid health and normal intestinal flora. 

Iodine and selenium are key micronutrients essential for proper thyroid function. In turn, millions of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium lactis, help to maintain a healthy intestinal environment. 

The following is a supplementary vitamin.

Additionally, vitamin B12 supports normal energy metabolism and the nervous system. The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

The product is an excellent choice for people with thyroid problems and intestinal disorders.

Probiotic

Panaseus Bowel Formula

Panaseus Bowel Formula
5.0
  • Active ingredients: L-glutamine, fennel seed extract, marigold flower extract, Indian frankincense bark resin extract, incense, inulin, rhizome extract curcuma, sodium butyrate, probiotic bacteria 
  • .
  • Form: capsules
  • .
  • Dose: 1 capsule per day
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 50 days
  • .
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

Using Panaseus Digestive Formula can help improve intestinal health by supporting the intestinal barrier, reducing inflammation, protecting against damage and restoring healthy intestinal microflora.

Experience a rós difference in gut function with plant extracts, amino acids and probiotic bacteria.

Pros and cons

Using Panaseus Digestive Formula can help improve intestinal health by supporting the intestinal barrier, reducing inflammation, protecting against damage and restoring healthy intestinal microflora.

Experience a rós difference in gut function with plant extracts, amino acids and probiotic bacteria.

Additional information

Using Panaseus Digestive Formula can help improve intestinal health by supporting the intestinal barrier, reducing inflammation, protecting against damage and restoring healthy intestinal microflora.

Experience a rós difference in gut function with plant extracts, amino acids and probiotic bacteria.

Sanprobi IBS

Sanprobi IBS
4.8
  • Active ingredients: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v
  • .
  • Form: capsules
  • .
  • Packaging: 20 capsules
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 20 days
  • .
Product description

Dietary supplement supports intestinal function thanks to a sufficient number of live cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum species. The product has a positive opinion of the Institute „Child Health Memorial Centre” No. 83/OP and the Quality Institute of the Jagiellonian Centre of Innovation.

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Pros and cons

Dietary supplement supports intestinal function thanks to a sufficient number of live cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum species. The product has a positive opinion of the Institute „Child Health Memorial Centre” No. 83/OP and the Quality Institute of the Jagiellonian Centre of Innovation.

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Additional information

Dietary supplement supports intestinal function thanks to a sufficient number of live cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum species. The product has a positive opinion of the Institute „Child Health Memorial Centre” No. 83/OP and the Quality Institute of the Jagiellonian Centre of Innovation.

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Asecurin IB

Asecurin IB
4.9
  • Active ingredients: Lactobacillus plantarum LP01, Bifidobacterium breve BR03, Saccharomyces boulardii, inulin
  • .
  • Form: capsules
  • .
  • Packaging: 20 capsules
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 20 days
  • .
Product description

Asecurin IB is a synbiotic, i.e. a combination of a probiotic and a prebiotic. It contains bacteria and yeast to support the intestines and digestive system, as well as inulin, whichós food for these microorganisms. The addition of a prebiotic supports and accelerates the growth of beneficial bacterial flora in the intestines.

Pros and cons

Asecurin IB is a synbiotic, i.e. a combination of a probiotic and a prebiotic. It contains bacteria and yeast to support the intestines and digestive system, as well as inulin, whichós food for these microorganisms. The addition of a prebiotic supports and accelerates the growth of beneficial bacterial flora in the intestines.

Additional information

Asecurin IB is a synbiotic, i.e. a combination of a probiotic and a prebiotic. It contains bacteria and yeast to support the intestines and digestive system, as well as inulin, whichós food for these microorganisms. The addition of a prebiotic supports and accelerates the growth of beneficial bacterial flora in the intestines.

Multilac Baby Synbiotic

Multilac Baby Synbiotic
4.9
  • Probiotic strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus 
  • .
  • Additional active ingredients: prebiotics (fructooligosaccharides)
  • .
  • Form: drops
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  • Dose: 6 drops
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  • Sufficient for: 16 days
  • .
Product description

Synbiotic drops intended for children and infants. In addition to probiotic bacteria strains, it also contains prebiotics, which promote the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms in the intestines.

Synbiotic drops for children and infants.

Synbiotic contains MURE technology, whichóra improves the survival of bacterial cultures. 

Pros and cons

Synbiotic drops intended for children and infants. In addition to probiotic bacteria strains, it also contains prebiotics, which promote the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms in the intestines.

Synbiotic drops for children and infants.

Synbiotic contains MURE technology, whichóra improves the survival of bacterial cultures. 

Additional information

Synbiotic drops intended for children and infants. In addition to probiotic bacteria strains, it also contains prebiotics, which promote the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms in the intestines.

Synbiotic drops for children and infants.

Synbiotic contains MURE technology, whichóra improves the survival of bacterial cultures. 

Polpharma Acidolac

Polpharma Acidolac
4.8
  • Probiotic strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus 
  • .
  • Additional active ingredients: prebiotics (fructooligosaccharides)
  • .
  • Form: powder (sachets)
  • .
  • Dose: 1 sachet
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 10 days
  • .
Product description

Probiotic enriched with the addition of prebioticsós to help restore the intestinal bacterial flora. An interesting form of administration, i.e. sachets with powder to be dissolved in water or consumed directly. The preparation will prove useful for children whoóre not keen on taking drops.

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The dietary supplement can also be administered to infants.

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Pros and cons

Probiotic enriched with the addition of prebioticsós to help restore the intestinal bacterial flora. An interesting form of administration, i.e. sachets with powder to be dissolved in water or consumed directly. The preparation will prove useful for children whoóre not keen on taking drops.

.

The dietary supplement can also be administered to infants.

.
Additional information

Probiotic enriched with the addition of prebioticsós to help restore the intestinal bacterial flora. An interesting form of administration, i.e. sachets with powder to be dissolved in water or consumed directly. The preparation will prove useful for children whoóre not keen on taking drops.

.

The dietary supplement can also be administered to infants.

.

APTEO probiotic drops

APTEO probiotic drops
4.8
  • Probiotic strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus 
  • .
  • Additional active ingredients: none
  • .
  • Formula: drops
  • .
  • Dose: 5 drops
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 40 days
  • .
Product description

A dietary supplement in a convenient form of drops, intended for infants from the first day of life. It helps build up the correct intestinal microflora in the youngest.

Preparation.

Preparation supports intestinal function, digestion and immunity.

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Pros and cons

A dietary supplement in a convenient form of drops, intended for infants from the first day of life. It helps build up the correct intestinal microflora in the youngest.

Preparation.

Preparation supports intestinal function, digestion and immunity.

.
Additional information

A dietary supplement in a convenient form of drops, intended for infants from the first day of life. It helps build up the correct intestinal microflora in the youngest.

Preparation.

Preparation supports intestinal function, digestion and immunity.

.

Vivomixx Microcapsules

Vivomixx Microcapsules
4.9
  • Probiotic strains: Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus
  • .
  • Additional active ingredients: none
  • .
  • Form: capsules
  • .
  • Dosage: 1–4 capsules daily
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 7–30 days
  • .
Product description

A dietary supplement containing a complex of different strainsóof probioticsós. The diversified types of bacterial cultures will help to effectively rebuild the microbiota of the digestive system, improve intestinal function and support the body's natural immunity.

Probiotic supplement.

Pros and cons

A dietary supplement containing a complex of different strainsóof probioticsós. The diversified types of bacterial cultures will help to effectively rebuild the microbiota of the digestive system, improve intestinal function and support the body's natural immunity.

Probiotic supplement.

Additional information

A dietary supplement containing a complex of different strainsóof probioticsós. The diversified types of bacterial cultures will help to effectively rebuild the microbiota of the digestive system, improve intestinal function and support the body's natural immunity.

Probiotic supplement.

Joy Day Probiotics Forest Fruits

Joy Day Probiotics Forest Fruits
4.9
  • Probiotic strains: Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, L. casei, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium breve,, B. longum, B. animalis ssp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus.
  • Additional active ingredients: extracts from fermented herbal plants and fruits
  • .
  • Formula: liquid
  • .
  • Dose: 125 ml per day (one bottle)
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 1 day
  • .
Product description

A multi-strain probiotic obtained by natural plant fermentation. One bottle is a daily serving of the product. 

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The dietary supplement helps to rebuild the natural intestinal bacterial flora, and thanks to the additional content of extracts from forest fruitsóherbsóherbs, it additionally supports the urinary tract and general immunity.

Product is suitable for children from the age of three, adults and older people.

Pros and cons

A multi-strain probiotic obtained by natural plant fermentation. One bottle is a daily serving of the product. 

.

The dietary supplement helps to rebuild the natural intestinal bacterial flora, and thanks to the additional content of extracts from forest fruitsóherbsóherbs, it additionally supports the urinary tract and general immunity.

Product is suitable for children from the age of three, adults and older people.

Additional information

A multi-strain probiotic obtained by natural plant fermentation. One bottle is a daily serving of the product. 

.

The dietary supplement helps to rebuild the natural intestinal bacterial flora, and thanks to the additional content of extracts from forest fruitsóherbsóherbs, it additionally supports the urinary tract and general immunity.

Product is suitable for children from the age of three, adults and older people.

What does a probiotic do for the gut?

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Probiotics are crucial to the health of your digestive system, acting in two main ways. On the one hand, they actively participate in the process of breaking down food into intermediates, making it easier for your digestive system. As a result, the nutrients in the foods you eat are better absorbed by your bodyand.

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Probiotics help the host digest and absorb valuable substances from food, metabolise toxic metabolic products, and produce amino acids and short-chain fatty acids necessary for normal human activity.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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On the other hand, probiotics are extremely effective against pathogens. They work by competing with them for access to food and by producing substances (so-called postbiotics) that show the ability to destroy certain germs. An example of this is rotaviruses, which are often responsible for diarrhoea. Probiotics, thanks to their properties, can effectively fight themand.

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Probiotics also prevent pathogens from adhering to the intestinal walls and producing enterotoxins.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Probiotic for irritable bowel

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Irritable bowel syndrome ( Irritable Bowel Syndrome - IBS) is an ailment that can cause many unpleasant symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation or diarrhoea. Probiotics can play a positive role in helping to treat this condition by improving the balance of the gut microflora.

Scientific research suggests that probiotics can help treat IBS in several ways. Firstly, they improve the balance of bacteria in the gut. Many people with irritable bowel syndrome have an impaired microflora, which is referred to as dysbiosis. Probiotics can help reset this microflora by promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria and inhibiting the growth of harmful onesand.

Secondly, probiotics can help reduce inflammation in the gut, which is often present in people with IBS. Certain types of bacteria, such as Lactobacillus reuteri have shown the ability to reduce inflammationand.

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Responsive strains of probiotic bacteria modulate the permeability of the intestinal mucosa, thereby influencing the body's generalised inflammation.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Thirdly, probiotics can help regulate bowel movements. Many people with IBS suffer from alternating constipation and diarrhoea. Some studies suggest that probiotics may help regulate intestinal peristalsis, providing relief from both constipation and diarrhoeaand.

Remember, however, that the effectiveness of probiotics can depend on a number of factors, such as the strain of bacteria, dose and duration of supplementation. Always consult with your doctor or pharmacist before starting probiotic supplements to ensure they are suitable for your condition.

Probiotics are a good choice for you.

Probiotics for colonic diverticulosis

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Diverticulosis of the large intestine, also known as diverticular disease, is a condition that can cause a range of unpleasant symptoms such as abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhoea.

Research on this topic is quite limited, but some studies suggest that probiotics may help manage diverticular disease by reducing unpleasant symptoms such as abdominal pain and bloatingand.

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In the 2019 study, participants were divided into two groups. The control group was given the standard antibiotic used to treat diverticular disease. The rest of the participants supplemented with the antibiotic in combination with three strains of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium lactis LA304Lactobacillus salivarius LA302 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA201.

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Results suggest that abdominal pain and inflammation in the body were reduced to a greater extent in those taking the probiotic preparation than in the group that only took the antibioticand.

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The same research team also tested the effect of the strain Lactobacillus reuteri ATCCPTA4659 on patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. The results were similar, with patients experiencing significant pain relief and inflammation rates decreasing. It was also associated with a shorter period of hospitalisationand.

It is important to remember that probiotics are not a cure for diverticular disease. They cannot prevent the formation of diverticula or repair existing ones. They are only a supportive adjunct to treatment that can help manage symptoms.

Probiotics are not a cure for diverticulosis.

Probiotic for lazy bowel

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Plazy bowel, or more correctly lazy bowel syndrome, is a condition in which intestinal peristalsis is slowed down. This can lead to problems with bowel movement regularity, causing constipation and discomfort.

Probiotics can help to balance the gut microflora. A healthy gut flora is crucial for proper digestion and bowel movements. By populating the gut with healthy bacteria, they can help restore homeostasisand.

Some probiotics can also stimulate intestinal peristalsis, which can help regulate bowel movements. This is particularly beneficial for people with lazy bowels, who tend to have problems with constipation. Improved peristalsis causes faecal masses to move smoothly through the intestines and facilitates bowel movementand.

Fibre and constipation

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It is often said that for lazy bowels or constipation you need to consume a lot of fibre. This is true, but the problem is that an excess of it can also lead to constipation. To guard against this paradox, eat around 20-40g of fibre a dayand and drink plenty of water.

Probiotic for leaky gut

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Leaky gut syndrome is a condition in which the intestinal mucosa becomes excessively permeable, allowing not only nutrients but also harmful substances: toxins, bacteria and other pathogens to enter the bloodstream. This can lead to a number of health problems, such as disease liver disease, digestive problems and chronic inflammationand.

Probiotics help to balance the intestinal microflora. In leaky gut syndrome, this balance is often disrupted, leading to a dominance of harmful bacteria. Probiotics help to restore the homeostasis of the microbiota, by populating the gut with beneficial bacteria and inhibiting the spread of harmful onesand.

Additionally, probiotics can also help repair damaged intestinal mucosa. Some probiotic strains are able to produce special substances that accelerate the regeneration of intestinal epithelial cells, which helps to restore the normal intestinal barrierand.

Probiotics can also help restore the intestinal barrier.

Probiotics can also help reduce the inflammation that often accompanies leaky gut syndrome. They work by modulating the immune response, which helps to reduce the inflammatory responseand.

A 2014 study and a 2022 study review showed that strains Bifidobacterium lactis LA303 and LA304Lactobacillus acidophilus LA201 and DDS-1Lactobacillus plantarum LA301  299vLactobacillus salivarius LA302 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG may support the regeneration of damaged intestinal epithelium, as well as preventing further degradationand.

Important

Although probiotics can help with leaky gut syndrome, they are not a substitute for professional medical help. Always consult your doctor before starting supplements, especially if you are suffering from any health problems.

Probiotic for ulcerative colitis

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Ulcerative colitis ( Ulcerative Colitis, UC) is a chronic disease that causes inflammation and ulcers in the colon. Can probiotics help? The answer to this question is not clear, but research suggests that they may play a positive role in this ailment.

In the context of ulcerative colitis, probiotics may work in several ways. First and foremost, they may help to rebalance the bacterial flora in the gut, which is often disrupted in people with UC. Some studies suggest that probiotics may also reduce inflammation, which may provide relief from symptomsand.

Some studies have shown that probiotic bacteria from the species Escherichia coli and Streptococcus thermophilus may be as effective as traditional medications in maintaining remission in people with ulcerative colitisand.

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Despite this promising evidence, remember that probiotics are not wonder pills. They can be helpful as an adjunct to standard therapy, but will not replace the need for drug treatment or lifestyle changes. It is always a good idea to consult your doctor or nutritionist before starting probiotics, especially if you suffer from ulcerative colitis.

Natural probiotics for the gut

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Probiotics can be found in many different foods. Below are the types of foods you can eat to provide yourself with probiotics for the gut.

Natural probiotics for the gut.

Natural yoghurt - is one of the best known sources of probiotics. It contains bacteria such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which are beneficial to our digestive system. When wanting to provide yourself with good bacteria, especially choose probiotic yoghurts that have a specific strain.

Kefir -is a fermented milk drink that not only provides probiotics, but is also an excellent source of protein and calcium. 

Sauerkrauts - such as sauerkraut and cucumbers are a rich source of probiotics. The fermentation process they undergo creates natural probiotics in them.

Miso - is a Japanese soybean paste that is fermented and contains probiotics. It can be added to soups and sauces.

Tempeh - is a product from Indonesia that is made from fermented soybeans. It is a rich source of protein and probiotics.

Sourdough bread - its production process uses natural bacteria and yeast, which are beneficial to our digestive system.

Foods rich in probiotics are a great addition to diet, but it is important to remember that the bacteria in them will not assimilate as effectively as those in medicines and supplements. Why? Because they are not protected in any way from the digestive processes.

Additionally, you are also unable to determine exactly what types and strains of bacteria you are eating. So, if you are looking for a specific probiotic for a particular ailment, choosing a ready-made preparation may be a better idea.

Probiotics - contraindications

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Probiotics are usually safe for most people, but there are some situations where taking them may not be recommended. Remember that you should always consult your doctor before starting any supplementation - including probiotic therapy.

If you have a weakened immune system, for example due to chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, taking immunosuppressants or following surgery, taking probiotics may be risky.

Another contraindication to taking probiotics is severe intestinal diseases (e.g. Crohn's disease). With severe intestinal diseases, some strains may help, but others will actually harm you. Therefore, if you suffer from such ailments, consultation with a specialist will be a must.

If you are allergic, you should also exercise caution. Some probiotics may contain ingredients you may be allergic to or have an intolerance to, such as soya, lactose or fructose.

See also the following.

See also:

How to use probiotics?

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Preferably - as recommended by the manufacturer of a particular preparation or your doctor. Most probiotics should be taken about 1-2 hours before a meal, which increases the survival of the bacteria in the digestive tract. There is less acid in an empty stomach, which can kill probiotics.

For the same reason, probiotics should not be sipped with hot beverages or consumed shortly after taking them. You don't supplement good strains of bacteria to inadvertently boil them.

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It is also worth adding that regularity is important. Regeneration of the microbiome after antibiotic therapy can take up to several weeks.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Summary

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  • The best probiotics for the gut contain bacteria from the Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces yeast species in appropriate amounts.
  • Probiotics should be properly labelled (the name should be in three parts) and be in a form that allows them to survive in the digestive system.
  • Probiotics can reduce the proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms, improve intestinal peristalsis, and even reduce inflammation.
  • You can supplement beneficial bacteria by eating dairy products and various types of pickles.
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  • Most probiotic preparations should be taken on an empty stomach and sipped with lukewarm drinks.
  • Recommended probiotics include, for example, Alldeyn Rosebiotic and Dr. Jacob's Iodine + Selenium probio.
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FAQ

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. Will a probiotic help the gut?.

Yes, probiotics can help with gut problems. When these bacteria are consumed in the right amounts, they provide health benefits. They work by improving the balance of the gut microflora.

Take probiotics that contain species such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. For example, Bifidobacterium longum can help relieve constipation, abdominal pain and bloating.

Remember to consume probiotics along with fibre, as fibre acts as a prebiotic that helps beneficial bacteria to multiply. Good sources of fibre include fruit, vegetables and whole grains.

. What are the symptoms of bacteria in the gut?.

Symptoms of pathogenic bacteria in the gut can vary, but often include excessive gas, abdominal pain, altered bowel frequency, diarrhoea or constipation and even weight loss. Observe your body, look out for changes in digestion, pain or discomfort.

Go to your doctor if you notice any worrying symptoms. A specialist may order stool tests to help identify the presence of pathogenic bacteria.

Take a stool test.

. How long to take a probiotic for the gut.

Take probiotic for the gut for at least 2-4 weeks. The length of treatment depends on the condition of your digestive system. For example, if you are on antibiotics, use the probiotic for the entire treatment period and for another 2-3 weeks afterwards. In the case of intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, the treatment can last up to several months, but such long probiotic use should be prescribed by your doctor.

. Do probiotics cleanse the gut?.

In a sense, yes. Probiotic bacteria will not remove toxins or deposits lodged in the gut, so they will not cleanse the gut in the literal sense of the word. However, they may contribute to reducing the number of pathogenic microorganisms that inhabit the digestive system.

The metabolic products (postbiotics) of probiotic bacteria can kill certain pathogens. A sufficient amount of beneficial probiotics will also compete with them for food and space in the gut, making it harder for them to multiply.

. How to get rid of bad bacteria in the gut.

If you are suffering from intestinal complaints and suspect you have a bacterial infection - see your doctor. A specialist will be able to order the appropriate tests and implement effective treatment.

To get rid of bad gut bacteria, you can also look at your diet. Increase your fibre intake. Eat more vegetables, fruit and whole grains. Fibre helps eliminate pathogenic microbes by promoting healthy gut peristalsis and feeding beneficial probiotic bacteria.

Drink plenty of water - it keeps the body properly hydrated and aids digestion. Avoid processed and fatty foods as they can increase the number of harmful bacteria. Eat foods rich in probiotics: yoghurt, kefir, pickles.

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. What to eat to rebuild the intestinal bacterial flora?.

To rebuild your gut flora, eat fermented foods such as pickles, natural yoghurt and kefir. They are rich in probiotics, which improve the diversity of the gut microflora.

Consume fibre. Fibre-rich foods such as fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds and whole-grain cereal products promote the growth of beneficial gut bacteria. Avoid excessive consumption of processed foods and sugars. These can harm your gut microflora. Drink plenty of water, which helps your digestive system function properly.

You may also want to consider supplementation with prebiotics and probiotics. These can help to rebuild your gut flora and improve digestive comfort.

. Does an excess of probiotics harm you?.

Yes, excess probiotics can harm you. Even beneficial bacteria taken in too large quantities can multiply excessively and lead to SIBO syndrome. This is a bacterial proliferation syndrome in the small intestine. It can cause bloating, gas, diarrhoea and abdominal pain.

To avoid the dangers of excess bacteria in the body, always follow the manufacturer's recommendations or your doctor's instructions regarding the daily portions of probiotic preparations and the length of time you can take them.

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Emilia Moskal specialises in medical and psychological texts, including content for medical entities. She is a fan of simple language and reader-friendly communication. At Natu.Care, she writes educational articles.

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Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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