The diabetic diet: what a diabetic can eat [tables, menus, dishes].

See the 7-day menu for people with diabetes. Find out what to eat to keep your sugar in check.

Emilia Moskal - AuthorAuthorEmilia Moskal
Emilia Moskal - Author
AuthorEmilia Moskal
Natu.Care Editor

Emilia Moskal specialises in medical and psychological texts, including content for medical entities. She is a fan of simple language and reader-friendly communication. At Natu.Care, she writes educational articles.

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Marta Kuśnierczak - Reviewed byReviewed byMarta Kuśnierczak
Verified by an expert
Marta Kuśnierczak - Reviewed by
Reviewed by
Marta Kuśnierczak
Nutritionist

Project leader of the Cukrzyca.pl application. Graduate of dietetics at the Medical University of Poznan. Doctoral student at the Chair and Department of Oncology of the Medical University. She provides nutritional counselling to patients struggling with diet-related diseases and nutrition in oncological diseases.

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Bartholomew Turczynski - Edited byEdited byBartholomew Turczynski
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Bartłomiej Turczyński is the editor-in-chief of Natu.Care. He is responsible for the quality of the content created on Natu.Care, among others, and ensures that all articles are based on sound scientific research and consulted with industry specialists.

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Nina Wawryszuk - Fact-checkingFact-checkingNina Wawryszuk
Nina Wawryszuk - Fact-checking
Fact-checkingNina Wawryszuk
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Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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The diabetic diet: what a diabetic can eat [tables, menus, dishes].
29 April, 2024
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Adequate nutrition is crucial to the health and wellbeing of people with diabetes. In the case of type 2 diabetes, it can even put the disease into remission.

They're just shortbread biscuits, they don't have cream. Chips? After all, they're not sweet... Chips are made from potatoes, a potato is a vegetable, and vegetables are healthy. Do you believe that too? In this article, together with clinical nutritionist Aleksandra Cudna, we will tell you why this is not true.

What a healthy person gets away with, for a diabetic, can prove to be significant in its consequences. Adherence to a diabetic diet is crucial in the treatment of a disease recognised by the WHO as an epidemic of our times.

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In this article you will find:

  • Basic principles of the diabetes diet.
  • Basic principles of the diabetes diet.
  • Information on what the glycemic index is.
  • .
  • Products recommended for diabetics and examples of those they should avoid.
  • .
  • Prepared menu for 7 days.
  • .
  • Report for a delicious and healthy breakfast.
  • .

See also:

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Principles of the diabetic diet

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The basic rule of thumb for the diabetic diet is to eat your meals at even intervals (e.g. every 3-4 hours), at fixed times, avoiding snacking in between. You will then find it easiest to control your blood sugar levels.

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For people with diabetes or insulin resistance, it is important not only to have the right meal schedule throughout the day, but also to have the right balance of macronutrients: protein, fat and carbohydrates. It is important to eat meals regularly, at fixed times and at equal intervals. An irregular eating rhythm or skipping certain meals promotes fat accumulation, resulting in more fat cells that are capable of producing adipocytokines - proteins responsible for, among other things, insulin sensitivity.
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Marta Kuśnierczak.

Marta Kuśnierczakdietitian of the Cukrzyca.pl app

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People with diabetes should also limit their intake of carbohydrates, especially those containing simple sugars. However, this does not mean that they need to eliminate them from their menu altogether.

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In the diet of people with diabetes, the most important thing is to compose meals correctly, in such a way as to maintain normal blood glucose levels.
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Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka.

Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka Clinical nutritionist

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"You can do this by choosing products with a low glycaemic index. Examples? Swap wheat bread for whole grain, white rice for brown or basmati rice, and banana for berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries)." - adds dietitian.

So it can be said that a diabetic diet should simply be healthy and balanced, and focus on foods with a low glycaemic index (below 55).

Glycaemic index

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The glycaemic index is an indicator to classify foods by how quickly blood sugar levels rise after consumption. The faster the rise, the higher the glycaemic index and the more adverse the effect of the product on blood glucose levels.

Products with low glycaemic index are considered to be those with a GI of less than 55medium glycaemic index have products with a GI between 55 and 70, while high, those with a GI over 70.

Remember that the glycaemic index can differ even for the same products, such as two bananas. A green banana, which is not very ripe, will contain less simple sugars than a yellow or even a brown banana. Precisely for this reason, take the glycaemic index values only as a general guide.

Did you know that...

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The glycaemic index of a raw, whole carrot is 16, but when you cut it up it jumps to 35! In contrast, cooked, whole and unpeeled carrots will have a GI of 39. 

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Don't forget that carrots still have a low glycaemic index. So don't shy away from vegetables, which should be a staple in your diet, just focus on avoiding processed foods.
Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka.

Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka Clinical nutritionist

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Diet in type 1 diabetes

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Although an appropriate diet is helpful in maintaining normal blood sugar levels and improves quality of life for people with both types of diabetes, for type 1 diabetes, a specialist should be consulted.

Type 1 diabetes is an inherited autoimmune disease that involves the destruction of pancreatic cells responsible for insulin production by the body's own immune system. Patients with type 1 diabetes are condemned to take insulin for life.

Their health depends on correctly set insulin doses, and this is also influenced by diet. This is why dietary consultation is particularly recommended for people with this type of diabetes.

Diet.

Diet in type 2 diabetes

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With type 2 diabetes, or acquired diabetes, on the other hand, diet can be crucial in the treatment process. The right diet can help you to improve metabolic indicators, such as lipid profile or blood pressure.

Through diet, it is even possible to put the disease into remission. In a 2016 study, a group of people with diabetes for less than six years were put on a diet prepared by the researchers. Its premise was to limit daily kilocalorie intake and most meals were in liquid form (soups and shakes). 

As you can easily guess, most patients following the diet lost weight significantly. In 86% of those who lost more than 15 kg, there was a remission of diabetes. Disease withdrawal was also observed in 57% of patients who lost between 10 and 15 kg and in 34% of those who lost between 5 and 10 kg.

The following studies were also conducted.

Also other studies confirm that the diet of people with type 2 diabetes should focus on weight loss. This is particularly important in people with obesity, where the patient should be aiming for a normal weight.

Diet.

Diet in insulin resistance

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Dietetics and diabetes nutrition specialists working with the Diabetes.co.uk app explain how to eat with insulin resistance:

Diet in insulin resistance.

Diet in insulin resistance should be based on the principles of healthy and rational nutrition, taking into account the basic principles of diet in carbohydrate disorders. Such a dietary model should be based on products with a low or medium glycaemic index, which do not cause a rapid increase in blood glucose concentration and consequently a rapid insulin release.

Diet in insulin resistance should be based on the principles of a healthy and rational diet, taking into account the basic principles of the diet in insulin resistance.

Insulin prevention

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The Mediterranean diet is recommended for the prevention of insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Its protective effects are associated with an adequate intake of whole proteins, whole grain products, fruits and vegetables and marine fish rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3.

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Fibre is also very important as it slows down the gastric emptying rate and the digestion and absorption process. It should be provided with the diet in an amount of about 30 g/day.
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Marta Kuśnierczak.

Marta Kuśnierczakdietitian of the Cukrzyca.pl app

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Products with a high glycaemic index should be avoided. The energy value of the diet should be adjusted individually.

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Diabetic diet - what is allowed and what is not

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The diet of people with diabetes should, above all, be healthy and balanced. Low-processed foods are recommended: vegetables, fruit with a low glycaemic index (e.g. berries), lean meat, fish and whole-grain cereal products.

The following is recommended

It is also not true that diabetics should forget about desserts. Even with this disease, you can indulge in something sweet, such as fruit yoghurt or jelly. Ideally, these products should be sweetened with erythritol, xylitol or stevia, i.e. low-calorie sweeteners that do not raise blood sugar levels.

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Traditional sweets, full of cream, sugar and saturated fats, are not recommended instead. Some snacks, although they look innocent, also adversely affect blood sugar levels. Salty sticks, for example, are such an insidious treat.

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The blacklist also includes fatty and highly processed foods, i.e. all kinds of fast food, crisps and ready meals. Diabetics should also limit their consumption of red meat.

Diabetics should also limit their consumption of red meat.

Interesting fact:

Some foods considered healthy when eaten in excess can adversely affect people with diabetes and insulin resistance. In a study from May 2023, researchers showed an adverse effect of long-term almond consumption on glucose levels and insulin sensitivity in men. The study participants consumed 50 grams of whole almonds per day, for five months. The effect was a worsening of metabolic parameters including weight gain.

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Remember, however, that nuts, including almonds, eaten in moderation are a great source of good fats and are not worth giving up completely!
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Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka.

Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka Clinical nutritionist

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What can a diabetic eat without restrictions?

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People with diabetes can eat vegetables with a low glycaemic index without reproach (and virtually without restriction). Especially fresh and those cooked al dente. If you can't imagine an evening movie without munching - munch carrots or kohlrabi. Sauerkraut or pickled cucumber can also be an interesting snack for those who like sour flavours.

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Can a diabetic eat sausages?

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Sausages are not recommended for diabetics. They are usually made from poor quality meat with added fat and fillers (you prefer not to know what kind). Sausages are also one type of highly processed food that has negligible nutritional value.

However, there are exceptions to this rule. More and more sausages made from good quality meat are appearing on the Polish market. If you are a steam-eater, take a moment to analyse the ingredients and choose those made from lean poultry meat, without preservatives or strange additives. Sokoliki, for example, has a good composition.

What a diabetic can eat - table

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cookies

Soups

sorbets

Product group

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Healthy examples

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bread

Rye, wholemeal, graham

groats and rice

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brown rice, basmati rice, pearl barley groats, buckwheat groats, barley groats

macarons

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full-grain and semolina (i.e. durum wheat), chickpea, lentil, pea

cereal

Kefir, natural yoghurt, buttermilk, skim and semi-skimmed cottage cheese, skim homogenised cheese with no added sugar, milk with a fat content of up to 2%

fat

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meat and zoonotic products

meat. lean poultry meat, veal, rabbit, fish, eggs, lean poultry meats

meat and animal products.

fats

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Olive oil, rapeseed oil, flaxseed oil, grapeseed oil, nigella oil, high quality soft margarines with plant sterols and stanols

fat

Vegetables

Fresh, frozen, non-fried and uncooked, leguminous vegetables (chickpeas, lentils, peas, broad beans, beans)

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Fruits

Fresh, frozen, not too ripe (e.g. slightly green bananas)

Fresh, frozen, not too ripe.

nuts, seeds, pips

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Walnuts, almonds, cashew nuts, Brazil nuts, chia seeds, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds

soups

Vegetable creams and broths, soups with chunks of vegetables, lean meat broths, soups flavoured with skim milk or yoghurt

Desserts

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sorbets, fruit salads, jellies, jellies, puddings prepared with skim milk with no added sugar

sorbets, fruit salads, jellies, jellies, puddings prepared with skim milk without added sugar

beverages

. water, coffee and tea without sugar, herbal infusions, vegetable juices

spices

herbs, pepper, spices, mustard

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What to avoid with diabetes - table of products

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bread

breads.

Product group:

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Products to avoid:

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bread

Wheat, butter, corn, honey or sugar, caramel-coloured, Kaiser rolls, yeast cakes, croissants, doughnuts and other pastries

groats and rice

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white rice, sushi rice, arborio rice (for risotto), semolina, maize groats

corn groats.

macarons

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noodles, wheat pasta made from refined flour

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sugar

fatty milk and yoghurt, sweetened dairy drinks, fatty cottage cheese, cream, yellow, moulded and processed cheeses

fatty milk and yoghurt, sweetened dairy drinks, fatty quark, cream, yellow, moulded and processed cheeses

meat and animal products

. beef, pork, beef, horsemeat, goose, duck, fatty parts of poultry (wings and legs with skin), offal, pâté, black pudding, fatty sausages, sausages, brawn, tinned meat

meat and animal products

meat and animal products.

fats

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lard, pork fat, butter, coconut oil, palm oil, corn oil, hard margarines, mayonnaise

Vegetables

salads with lots of fatty dressing, Chips, fried potatoes

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fruits

Dried, candied, in syrups, in the form of high-sugar jams and preserves

nuts

salted, fried, coated

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soups

fat broth, bone broth, soups thickened with roux or cream

soup

desserts

All desserts with a lot of sugar and fat - cakes with cream, shortcrust pastries, doughnuts, puddings

beverages

sweetened carbonated beverages, sweetened fruit and dairy drinks, fruit juices, alcohol

spices

sugar, honey, ketchup and other sugar-sweetened sauces

Diabetic diet - 7-day menu

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Want more specifics? Here's a weekly menu for a diabetic with three meals a day that you can use:

Day 1

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Breakfast:

  • oatmeal with milk or plant-based drink, unsweetened shredded coconut and 1/4 cup frozen berries,
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  • whole-grain toast with avocado and tomato,
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  • coffee with skim milk or a plant-based drink,
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Lunch:

  • grilled chicken breast with roasted vegetables (peppers, courgettes and onions),
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  • mixed salad with cherry tomatoes, olive oil and wine vinegar,
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  • a small apple,
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Dinner:

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  • grilled fish with quinoa and roasted asparagus,
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  • roasted beets,
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  • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
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Day 2

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Breakfast:

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  • Greek yoghurt with raspberries and almonds,
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  • full-grain toast with peanut butter,
  • .
  • green tea,
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Lunch:

  • grilled turkey burger,
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  • kale salad with cucumber, tomatoes and vinaigrette dressing,
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  • small pear,
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Dinner:

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  • beef stir-fry with brown rice,
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  • steamed broccoli,
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  • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
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Day 3

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Breakfast:

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  • veggies with spinach and tomatoes,
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  • one slice of whole grain bread,
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  • black coffee,
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Lunch:

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  • grilled chicken with roasted yams,
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  • mixed salad with avocado, tomatoes and balsamic dressing,
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  • a small orange,
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Dinner:

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  • baked salmon with brown rice,
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  • brown Brussels sprouts cooked al dente,
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  • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
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    Day 4

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    Breakfast:

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    • low-fat cottage cheese with pear and walnuts,
    • .
    • one slice of whole-grain bread with fruit jam,
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    • green tea,
    • .

    Lunch:

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    • soup with chicken and vegetables,
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    • whole wheat bread with hummus,
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    • a small apple,
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    Dinner:

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    • grilled veal with green beans,
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    • buckwheat groats with braised mushrooms,
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    • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
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    Day 5

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    Breakfast:

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    • oatmeal with milk or vegetable drink, flaxseed and berries
    • .
    • coffee with milk or vegetable drink
    • .

    Lunch:

    • grilled salmon with roasted yams, carrots and red peppers,
    • .
    • mixed lettuce with tomatoes seasoned with vinaigrette dressing
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    • a small banana
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    Dinner:

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    • grilled tofu with vegetable skewers (red onion, red pepper and squash),
    • .
    • brown rice,
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    • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
    • .

    Day 6

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    Breakfast:

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    • veggies with courgette,
    • .
    • full grain toast with avocado and tomato,
    • .
    • green tea,
    • .

    Lunch:

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    • turkey stew with mixed vegetable salad with olive oil and vinegar,
    • .
    • whole wheat pasta,
    • .
    • a small orange,
    • .

    Dinner:

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    • grilled turkey breast with roasted root vegetables (carrots, turnips and parsnips),
    • .
    • steamed spinach,
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    • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
    • .

    Day 7

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    Breakfast:

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    • Greek yoghurt with strawberries and whole grain granola,
    • .
    • black coffee,
    • .

    Lunch:

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    • grilled prawns with fresh vegetable salad (cucumber, tomato and spring onion),
    • .
    • roasted Brussels sprouts,
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    • small apple,
    • .

    Dinner:

    • roasted chicken with brown rice,
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    • green refried beans with peppers,
    • .
    • carbonated water with a slice of lemon,
    • .

    Diabetic diet - breakfast recipe

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    Breakfast idea for a diabetic has been prepared by clinical nutritionist Aleksandra Cudna-Bartnicka.

    Shakshuka, or eggs in tomatoes

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    Ingredients:

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    • 2 eggs,
    • .
    • 1 clove of garlic,
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    • 1 teaspoon olive oil,
    • .
    • 250 ml canned sliced tomatoes,
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    • 1 slice of rye bread,
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    • oregano, pepper, salt,
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    • basil,
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    • any vegetable paste,
    • .

    Making method:

    .

    Heat the olive oil in a frying pan, add the pressed garlic and sauté until browned. Then add the tomatoes, season with oregano, pepper and salt to taste, stir and wait for the water to evaporate a little.

    Add the tomatoes.

    Make 2 cavities and crack the eggs into them. Cook until the white has set and the yolk remains liquid. Serve with a slice of rye bread spread with any vegetable paste.

    Serve.

    Why follow a diabetic diet?

    .

    Adequate nutrition is crucial in managing blood glucose levels. The diabetic diet aims to keep glucose levels stable, minimising sugar spikes in the body.

    Following it minimises the risk of diabetes complications, such as damage to the kidneys, eyes, nervous and cardiovascular systems. A diabetic diet that focuses on a balanced intake of micro- and macronutrients can also improve patients' wellbeing and quality of life.

    Diabetic diet is an important part of the diabetes management process.

    Interesting fact:

    One of the complications of diabetes in men can be a decline in the quality of sexual life due to erection problems. With proper nutrition, these discomforts can be minimised.

    Research also suggests that a diabetic diet can reduce oxidative stress the body by increasing the intake of antioxidants and bioactive substances such as polyphenols.

    How to take care of normal blood sugar concentrations?

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    A healthy balanced diet, geared towards products with a low glycaemic index, is the basis for taking care of correct blood sugar levels. However, it is not only the choice of the right foods that matters.

    How you prepare them is also important. Avoid fried dishes, especially meat and potatoes. Instead, choose dishes cookedstewed or baked.

    Please also remember to hydrate your body properly. Adequate water will allow your internal organs to function properly. Drink a minimum 2 litres of fluids per day.

    Physical activity improves the body's sensitivity to insulin. It also helps reduce body weight and is recommended for people with diabetes. However, before you set yourself a ten-kilometre running route or grab the heaviest dumbbells at the gym, ask your doctor about forms of exercise that are safe for you. Improperly chosen exercise with diabetes can do more harm than good.

    Summary

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    .
    • The diabetic diet should be geared towards foods with a low glycaemic index (below 55).
    • Diabetic diet should be geared towards foods with a low glycaemic index (below 55).
    • Carbohydrates should come from whole-grain products.
    • .
    • Lean meats, fish, plant-based fats, vegetables and non-transparent fruits are recommended for people with diabetes.
    • Diabetics should avoid highly processed foods, animal fats, sweets with high sugar content and drinking alcohol.
    • .
    • To maintain normal blood sugar levels, in addition to your diet, remember to hydrate your body and be physically active to suit your condition.
    .

    Resources

    .
    . See all.

    Gugala-Mirosz, M.Sc. S. (2018, February 28). Glycemic index - low, medium, high - which is better? National Center for Nutrition Education. https://ncez.pzh.gov.pl/abc-zywienia/indeks-glikemiczny-niski-sredni-wysoki-ktory-lepszy/

    How to live with diabetes. (n.d.). Patient. Retrieved June 14, 2023, from http://pacjent.gov.pl/jak-zyc-z-choroba/jak-zyc-z-cukrzyca

    Leslie, W. S., Ford, I., Sattar, N., Hollingsworth, K. G., Adamson, A., Sniehotta, F. F., McCombie, L., Brosnahan, N., Ross, H., Mathers, J. C., Peters, C., Thom, G., Barnes, A., Kean, S., McIlvenna, Y., Rodrigues, A., Rehackova, L., Zhyzhneuskaya, S., Taylor, R., & Lean, M. E. J. (2016). The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT): protocol for a cluster randomised trial. BMC Family Practice17, 20. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-016-0406-2

    Majak, I., Szczodrowska, A., Bartos, A., & Leszczy, J. (n.d.). Evaluation of the dietary regimen of people with type 2 diabeteshttps://www.ptfarm.pl/pub/File/Bromatologia/2015/Bromatologia%201_2015%20s%20032-039.pdf

    Food, N. C. E. (2019, June 21). Type 2 diabetes-Recommendations and menus. National Center for Nutrition Education. https://ncez.pzh.gov.pl/choroba-a-dieta/cukrzyca-typu-2-zalecenia-i-jadlospis/

    Agata Juruć, Dorota Pisarczyk-Wiza, Bogna Wierusz-Wysocka. Dietary recommendations and eating behaviours in people with type 1 diabetes - do they affect metabolic control? https://journals.viamedica.pl/clinical_diabetology/article/viewFile/36127/26600

    Kowalcze, K., & S, B. (2007). Effects of diet therapy on weight reduction and metabolic balance in people with type 2 diabetes treated with diet alone. Yearbooks of the National Institute of Hygiene1(58), 89-94. https://www.infona.pl/resource/bwmeta1.element.agro-article-53ea5026-c943-455b-9e61-fd7c91bd57c4

    Pandarek. (n.d.). Clinical recommendations for the management of people with diabetes 2023 Position statement of the Polish Diabetological Society. Retrieved June 14, 2023, from https://ptdiab.pl/zalecenia-ptd/zalecania-aktywni-czlonkowie-2023

    Dariusz Włodarek, Dominika Glabska. Eating habits of people with type 2 diabetes. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/268454259.pdf

    Janusz Ciok, Agnieszka Dolna. Glycemic index in the pathogenesis and dietary management of diabetes. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/268454119.pdf

    Agneska B. Niebisz, Mariusz Jasik, Waldemar Karnafel. The role of diet and lifestyle changes in the management of type 2 diabetes in a person with metabolic syndrome. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/268454461.pdf

    Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity-NIDDK. (n.d.). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved June 15, 2023, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/diet-eating-physical-activity

    Meal Planning. (2023, April 19). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing/eat-well/meal-plan-method.html

    Gravesteijn, E., Mensink, R. P., & Plat, J. (2023). The effects of long-term almond consumption on whole-body insulin sensitivity, postprandial glucose responses, and 48 h continuous glucose concentrations in males and females with prediabetes: A randomized controlled trial. European Journal of Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-023-03178-w

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    Meet the team
    Emilia Moskal - Author

    Natu.Care Editor

    Emilia Moskal specialises in medical and psychological texts, including content for medical entities. She is a fan of simple language and reader-friendly communication. At Natu.Care, she writes educational articles.

    Marta Kuśnierczak - Reviewed by

    Nutritionist

    Marta Kuśnierczak
    Verified by an expert

    Project leader of the Cukrzyca.pl application. Graduate of dietetics at the Medical University of Poznan. Doctoral student at the Chair and Department of Oncology of the Medical University. She provides nutritional counselling to patients struggling with diet-related diseases and nutrition in oncological diseases.

    Bartholomew Turczynski - Edited by

    Editor-in-Chief

    Bartłomiej Turczyński is the editor-in-chief of Natu.Care. He is responsible for the quality of the content created on Natu.Care, among others, and ensures that all articles are based on sound scientific research and consulted with industry specialists.

    Nina Wawryszuk - Fact-checking

    Natu.Care Editor

    Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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