The Dabrowski Diet: principles, recipes, opinions, effects, complications

Dr Dabrowski's diet - hit or miss?

Emilia Moskal - AuthorAuthorEmilia Moskal
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The Dabrowski Diet: principles, recipes, opinions, effects, complications
29 April, 2024
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Raw vegetables, fruit and fasting. Anyone who has been on the Dabrowski diet at least once knows what they are talking about. Those who have tried it are many. The same cannot be said, however, for those who have persevered to the end.

Two weeks on salads. And only from specific vegetables and fruits. Plus practically no fats in which to dissolve the vitamins eaten. And no protein. No wonder so many people don't complete Dabrowski's famous fast, or never want to hear about it again.

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From this article you will learn:

  • Where Dr Dabrowski's diet came from.
  • What the principles of the diet are.
  • What are the principles of this way of eating.
  • .
  • What you can eat during the Dabrowska fast.
  • What you can eat during the Dabrowska fast.
  • What effects can you expect.
  • .
  • Is the Dabrowska diet really good for your health.
  • What do people think about it?
  • What do the experts think about it.
  • .

See also:

What is the Dabrowski fast?

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Dr Eve Dabrowska's diet, also known as Dabrowska's fast or the cleansing fruit and vegetable diet, is a four-step dietary regimen, best known for its second phase, which involves restrictive kilocalorie restriction and eating only specific groups of vegetables and fruitsand.

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As the name suggests, the author of the diet is Ewa Dąbrowska, MD, who, until the 1990s, worked as an assistant professor at the Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical University of Gdansk, according to Dr Dąbrowska's official website. This information can also be found in the Central Register of Doctors.

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According to the theory put forward by the author, periods of fasting promote the process of autophagy, i.e. the body's own elimination of damaged and dead cells. They are also supposed to stimulate the famous sirtuins, known as longevity proteins.

Both mechanisms are said to promote the body's health processes and act on conditions such as:

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  • type 2 diabetes,
  • .
  • cardiovascular diseases,
  • .
  • lipid disorders,
  • .

Dr Dabrowska's diet is, by design, geared towards supporting the treatment of various conditions and taking care of overall improvement health - weight loss may be related to this, but is not her primary goaland.

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Importantly, the author herself does not recommend using this diet in place of conventional treatments, but rather as a complement to them or a last resort when standard medical procedures do not work. It can also be used simply as a prevention of cardiovascular, cancer and lifestyle diseases.

Dabrowska Diet - principles

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Dr Dabrowski's diet consists of four phases, three of which should last for the same length of time. Its main phase is fasting, which involves limiting the kilocalories consumed to a maximum of 800 per day and is generally intended to last for 2 weeks.

Dr. Dabrowski's Diet is a dietary supplement that is designed to be effective in the long term.

However, in justified cases it is possible - under the supervision of a doctor - to extend the fast up to 6 weeks, but then the phase of coming out of the fast should last the same amount of time.

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I have survived on the Dabrowska fast for 15 days and that is the best term for this diet. I used to believe in fasting detoxification and so on, now I know it doesn't work like that.
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Carolina32 years old

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Stages of the Dabrowski diet:

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Stage of the diet

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What it's all about

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Preparing the body for fasting

It consists of eliminating meat, coffee and products to which we have an intolerance from our diet.

Preparing the body for fasting.

Dr Dabrowska's post

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Eating only (preferably raw) low-sugar fruits and low-starch vegetables and limiting caloric intake to a maximum of 800 kcal per day.

Dr. Dabrowski's post

Fasting out

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Gradually add other foods to the diet, such as legumes or lean meat. This phase should last for the same length of time as the fasting period.

Stage by stage.

Full-food nutrition

A permanent change in eating habits, including basing one's menu on fruit and vegetables, being physically active and practising regular periods of fasting.

A change in eating habits, including basing one's menu on fruit and vegetables, being physically active and practising regular periods of fasting.

Fasting periods are considered a method of cleansing the body and a time when its natural homeostasis is restored.

Meal preparation

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Dr Dabrowski's diet is based on raw vegetables and fruits and juices made from them. Fresh vegetables should form the basis of the diet, but it is also acceptable to cook, stew or bake them. However, oil should not then be added to them, and frying is not an option at all.

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Dr Dabrowska diet - approved products (table)

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Below you will find a list of products allowed during the Dabrowski fasting period.

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Product group

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Specific examples

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Vegetables

Carrots

Beet

Selery

Parsley

Radish

Cabbage (all varieties)

Cauliflower

Broccoli

Kale

Currants

Onions

Leek

Clove

Pumpkin

Cabbage

Cucumber

Tomato

Paprika

Salad (all varieties)

Celery

Botwine

Sorrel

Spinach

Herb

Fruits

Apples

Grapefruit

Lemon

Berry

Beverages

Plant green shoot juices

Other vegetable and fruit juices

Fruit or herbal tea

Sugar-free compote

Vegetable decoction

Vegetable broth

Bright - Vegetables and fruit are healthy, and their increased consumption can reduce the risk of many diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular ailmentsand. This is nothing new or revelatory. In fact, similar principles can be found, for example, in the DASH diet and the Mediterranean diet, which are, however, much less restrictive and, most importantly, much better balanced.

Eva Dabrowska diet - prohibited products

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During strict fasting, you are not allowed to eat anything other than the products mentioned above. So all kinds of fats (even healthy ones), sources of proteins  (dairy products, eggs, meat and even legumes) and carbohydrates (groats, bread, pasta, potatoes) are out. You will also not drink coffee and black tea.

During the period of coming off the fast and then the 'whole food' diet, the restrictions get less, but you should still stay away from all processed foods and fatty meats.

Dabrowska Diet - effects

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The effect of the Eve Dabrowska diet is supposed to be, first and foremost, an improvement in health. It is supposed to occur through cleansing the body, recharging it with a powerful dose of antioxidants and activating sirtuins, i.e. proteins that are thought to have the ability to repair damaged DNAand.

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Of course, the fasting stage is also associated with weight loss due to the restrictive limitations on kilocalorie supply. However, this is a side effect, one might say. Although in some conditions (such as type 2 diabetes), losing weight itself also has a therapeutic effect. Therefore, in appropriate cases and under the supervision of a doctor, Dr Ewa Dąbrowska recommends extending the fasting stage for up to 6 weeksand.

For a holiday with Dr Dabrowska

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The Dabrowska diet is a real multi-branch business. If you don't feel up to taking care of the recommendations yourself, you can go to the dozen or so centres in Poland and abroad that run holidays under the doctor's patronage. On such holidays, patients are nourished according to Dabrowska's fasting recommendations.

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And if you cannot afford a holiday with the Dabrowska diet, but need help in implementing this way of eating, you are left with the app. You will find recipes, shopping lists and the ability to track your progress. If you count the monthly price, the cheapest version (annual subscription) costs PLN 249and.

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I lost almost 5 kg, but immediately after the fast I felt so hungry that I even craved strange combinations like herring with a bar and crisps, at once of course. Despite a solid meal, I continued to feel hungry. This went on for a few weeks and overall the weight came back on, and I think I supplied myself back with those toxins by eating meat and sweets.
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Carolina32 years old

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Eve Dabrowska Diet - side effects and complications

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For your body to function properly, you need more than just fibre, vitamins and minerals. You also need proteins, fats and carbohydrates. And these three are - ironically - in short supply in Dr Dabrowski's diet.

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If you don't provide yourself with the complete set of nutrients for a day or two, probably nothing will happen. However, Dabrowska's fasting involves restricting them for several days (usually 2 weeks).

If you don't provide yourself with a complete set of nutrients for one or two days, you'll probably be fine.

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It is worth noting that this 'diet' does not teach any healthy relationship with food - it is an 'from-to' stage, after which some people do not know what to do, how to eat, how to behave and either gain weight, reverting to old habits, or continue to starve themselves and damage their bodies.
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Kuba Pągowski.

Kuba Pągowski clinical dietitian

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If you decide to extend it (the guidelines allow you to stay on it for up to six weeks - under medical supervision) it already gets really dangerous. On top of that, there is a restrictive kilocalorie limitation.

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To this day I resent raw carrots and cabbage, after which I had bloating and other attractions. Apparently I was unbearable, clingy and unpleasant. Towards the end, hunger would rouse me from sleep until I once broke the ban and ate cut vegetables at night because I couldn't stand it.
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Carolina32 years old

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Potential side effects of the Dabrowski diet are:

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  • nutritional deficiencies,
  • .
  • weakening of the body,
  • .
  • headaches and dizziness,
  • .
  • concentration problems,
  • .
  • gastrointestinal problems (flatulence, diarrhoea),
  • hormonal disorders.
  • hormonal disorders,
  • .
  • menstrual disorders,
  • .
  • disorders of intestinal flora,
  • disorders of the intestinal flora.
  • sleeping problems,
  • .

In addition, it is worth noting that many scientific studies confirm that restrictive and excessive calorie restriction slows down the metabolismand. Therefore, when you return to taking in the correct number of kilocalories, you may experience a yo-yo effect. Often patients after such low-calorie diets gain more weight than they lose.

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A sudden, drastic cut in dietary kilocalories is a huge stress on the body. It doesn't understand that we are on Dr Dabrowski's diet, it just feels its life threatened by such dietary restrictions. So he starts to go into 'survival mode', slows his metabolic rate and lowers his basal metabolism.
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Nina Wawryszuk.

Nina WawryszukNatu.Care editor and personal trainer

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Does the Dabrowska fast have a scientific basis?

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I have found no scientific studies dedicated to the effects of the Dabrowski diet (apart from articles and books written by the author of this diet herself). Therefore, in order to assess whether science confirms the effectiveness of fasting, it remains to look at its assumptions:

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  • purification of the organism,
  • the process of autophagy
  • the autophagy process,
  • .
  • the activation of sirtuin,
  • .

Body cleansing has been a trendy topic for years. Many strange methods and specifics have been created to help rid the body of toxins and parasites.

Detoxification diets and other means of deep cleansing have attracted considerable controversy, for the reason that they carry the risk of upsetting metabolism and bowel function. They can also have an adverse effect on the microbiota. Used over a long period of time, they can even lead to metabolic acidosisand.

It is also worth remembering that your body has its own mechanisms to fight pollution. These includeand:

  • The skin -is the body's first defence barrier. It prevents the penetration of contaminants and microorganisms into the body.
  • The skin - is the body's first defence barrier.
  • Hairs and cilia  - hairs in the nose stop larger particles from entering the respiratory tract. Instead, the cilia in the lungs remove contaminants that have overcome this first obstacle.
  • .
  • Immune system - the cells of the immune system have specialised to locate and destroy toxins and pathogens.
  • Liver - the main organ responsible for removing toxins from the body. Produces a variety of enzymes and proteins (e.g. metallothioneins) that help to bind and remove harmful substances (including, for example, metals).
  • Kinneys - this organ filters out all waste and impurities and removes them from the body with urine.
  • Gastrointestinal tract - in it also to some extent the selection of substances into those that will be absorbed into the bloodstream and those that will be removed.

To assist your body in effective self-cleansing, it is advisable to follow a balanced diet, drink the recommended daily amount of water (this is mainly what facilitates flushing toxins) and be physically activeand. Instead, I have not encountered fasting in any official recommendations...

Autophagy is, in turn, the process by which the body captures damaged, old or 'used' parts of cells and converts them into energy - you could say it recycles. Dr Ewa Dąbrowska sees autophagy processes as a chance to cleanse and heal the body, repeatedly mentioning Prof Yoshinori Ohsumi, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2016 for his research on autophagyand.

It is worth mentioning, however, that most of this work was conducted on yeast. A 2021 review of studies on the effects of autophagy on various diseases indicates that this mechanism may indeed inhibit the development of some types of cancer, but on others it may have a ... stimulatory effectand.

Scientists are still looking for effective ways to modulate autophagy processes so that they only work to benefit the body and so that they can be used in cancer therapy .

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Autophagy is also being researched for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases (such as type 2 diabetes) and infectious diseases. However, this is very preliminary work and, more importantly, some results indicate both a positive and negative role for this process on health and the development of various diseasesand.

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In taking care of our health, we should be careful to focus on what works best for our health - the basics, which are boring but are responsible for 90% of success, namely: proper diet, maintaining a healthy weight, regular physical activity, sleep and hydration.
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Kuba Pągowski.

Kuba Pągowski clinical dietitian

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Similarly with sirtuins. Most of the available studies are experiments conducted on animals (flies, mice, etc.). Although their results are promising, there is no conclusive confirmation of their effect in humansand.

What we know for sure about them is that they are responsible for energy metabolism in the cell. And what fires up the minds of their proponents are positions of anti-ageing and anti-cancer properties. Indeed, some studies suggest that sirtuins may have the ability to trigger DNA repair processesand.

Scientists, however, are cooling their euphoria: it is possible that there is something in these sirtuins, but nothing is known for sure yet. Further research is needed.

The Dabrowska diet - expert opinions

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Jakub Pągowski, nutritionist:

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"This model of nutrition does not teach any eating habits. Well, unless the bad ones, which impose gigantic restrictions. In my professional practice, I often meet patients after such turnarounds and they are usually like in a fog: they want to improve their health, lose weight, but they don't know how, and this type of strategy only hinders them and at most makes their health worse."

Nina Wawryszuk, Editor of Natu.Care and personal trainer:

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"Dr. Dąbrowska's diet is very restrictive and puts you at risk of deficiencies such as   omega-3 acidsiron or calcium. Causes too rapid and unhealthy weight loss - unfortunately, you lose not only body fat but also muscle tissue. 'To persevere' diets are not good, they do not teach healthy eating habits and are a stress on the body."

Dabrowska Diet - recipes

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The following recipes are from the official Dr Dabrowska diet website (ewadabrowska.pl).

Kale and cabbage

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Sauerkraut with carrots and apple

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Ingredients:

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  • A handful of sauerkraut
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  • A small carrot
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  • Half a hard apple
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  • Freshly ground pepper, paprika and turmeric
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  • Optional: alfalfa (alfalfa) sprouts, finely chopped parsley and dill
  • .

Method of preparation:

  1. Place the cabbage in a bowl
  2. .
  3. Pick the carrots and apple and grate them.
  4. Pick the carrots and apple and grate them.
  5. Stir together all the vegetables with the sprouts, season to taste and sprinkle with the parsley and dill.
  6. Add the carrots and apple.

Beetroot sourdough

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Ingredients:

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  • 2 kg of beetroot
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  • 3 litres of water
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  • Stone salt
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  • 3 bulbs of garlic
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  • Some bay leaves, allspice seeds and black peppercorns
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  • 2 tablespoons of pickled cucumber juice
  • .

Method of preparation:

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  1. Wash and slice the beetroot, mix with the garlic and spices.
  2. Pour the brine over the beetroot.
  3. Pour over the brine prepared at a ratio of 1 litre to 1 tablespoon of rock salt.
  4. Pour the brine over the beets.
  5. The beetroots should not float out - you can cover them with a small plate or a well-washed stone.
  6. .
  7. Place covered with a linen cloth in a warm, airy place for a few days. You can use a spoon to scoop up the foam that forms several times a day.
  8. Take care of the foam.

Carrot juice

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Ingredients:

  • 4 large carrots
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  • A few drops of apple cider vinegar
  • .

Method of preparation:

  1. Rinse the carrots thoroughly and squeeze the juice in a juicer.
  2. Prepare the carrots in the juicer.
  3. Add a few drops of apple cider vinegar to the freshly squeezed juice.
  4. .

Tasty.

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Summary

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  • Dr Dabrowska's diet is a way of eating that is based on regular fasting.
  • Fasting is a period of time when the body is not eating.
  • Fasting periods are periods of restrictive cuts in caloric intake, involving the consumption of only allowed foods: certain vegetables and fruits.
  • Fasting periods are periods of restrictive cuts in caloric intake, involving the consumption of only allowed foods: certain vegetables and fruits.
  • Fasting periods can last from a few days to as long as 6 weeks, but for fasts exceeding 2 weeks, the author encourages people to stay under medical supervision.
  • .
  • The aim of the diet is to improve the overall health of the body.
  • .
  • Dabrowski's fast may have side effects, such as weakening of the body or slowing down of the metabolism.

FAQ

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. Is it possible to drink coffee on the Dabrowska diet?.

You cannot drink coffee during Dr Dabrowski's strict fasting period. And outside this stage, it is best to drink coffee that is not too strong, black coffee.

The Dabrowska diet focuses on eating fresh, raw vegetables and fruit, and avoids processed foods.

An example of a healthy coffee on the Dabrowski diet can be an infusion of coffee beans brewed in a coffee machine or filter and served alone, or with a small amount of plant-based milk.

. What the Dabrowski diet is about .

The Dabrowska diet involves consuming mainly raw vegetables, fruits and sprouts for 2-6 weeks. It is recommended to avoid animal products, including meat, dairy and eggs. It is also important to eliminate processed foods rich in preservatives, artificial additives and sugars.

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In the Dabrowski diet, it is important to eat foods in their raw form, as valuable nutrients such as enzymes, vitamins and minerals may be lost during heat processing.

. How much weight can you lose on the Dabrowski diet?.

On the Dabrowski diet, you can lose an average of 2 to even 4 kg per week. In comparison, healthy weight loss is between 0.5 and 1 kg per week. Remember that losing weight is the result of a calorie deficit, but you should still provide your body with all the nutrients it needs.

The Dabrowska diet is extremely low in calories during fasting periods, and to make matters worse, it lacks some of the macronutrients such as protein or fat.

. Is it possible to follow the Dabrowski diet with type 2 diabetes?.

Following the Dabrowski diet can be dangerous with type 2 diabetes and lead to fluctuations in insulin levels. It is better to focus on eating fresh vegetables and fruit, whole grain cereals, healthy fats (e.g. avocados, nuts), protein sources (e.g. lean meat, fish) and avoid highly processed foods, sugar and sweets.

. How many apples can you eat on the Dabrowski diet?.

On the Dabrowski diet, apples are seen as a low-sugar fruit, so it is acceptable to eat 2 apples per day.

. How many meals a day are eaten on the Dabrowski diet?.

During the fasting period, the recommendations are to eat 3 meals a day, and the total calories must not exceed 800 kcal. During other stages of the diet, the number and calorie content of meals can be adapted to individual needs.

. Can bananas be eaten on Dr Dabrowski's diet?.

Bananas, as a fruit rich in sugar, are not on the list of foods allowed during the Dabrowski's fasting period. However, you can introduce them during the phase of leaving the fast and during the phase of complete nutrition.

. Is it possible to exercise on the Dabrowski diet?.

Movement is important on Dr Dabrowski's diet, but it assumes moderate activity such as walking or body gymnastics. Gym workouts or typical cardio (e.g. running, crossfit) are not advisable as they exacerbate the kilocalorie deficit and worsen the body's regeneration, among other things.

Movement is not recommended.

This can also result in severe weakness, fainting, lack of strength, worsening of mood and increased feelings of hunger, which can awaken from sleep.

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