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Oxidative stress: what it is, causes, symptoms, research, how to treat it

Discover the secrets of oxidative stress and how it affects your body.

Ludwig Jelonek - AuthorAuthorLudwig Jelonek
Ludwig Jelonek - Author
AuthorLudwig Jelonek
Natu.Care Editor

Ludwik Jelonek is the author of more than 2,500 texts published on leading portals. His content has found its way into services such as Ostrovit and Kobieta Onet. At Natu.Care, Ludwik educates people in the most important area of life - health.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed byReviewed byIlona Bush
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Ilona Bush - Reviewed by
Reviewed byIlona Bush
Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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Bartholomew Turczynski - Edited by
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Bartłomiej Turczyński is the editor-in-chief of Natu.Care. He is responsible for the quality of the content created on Natu.Care, among others, and ensures that all articles are based on sound scientific research and consulted with industry specialists.

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Nina Wawryszuk - Fact-checkingFact-checkingNina Wawryszuk
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Fact-checkingNina Wawryszuk
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Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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Oxidative stress: what it is, causes, symptoms, research, how to treat it
29 April, 2024
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23 min
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Oxidative stress affects the body's cells like sand affects an engine - it gradually slows down the function and destroys the efficiency of all mechanisms.

That is why we will answer all your questions about oxidative stress together with pharmacist Ilona Krzak, MSc, and clinical nutritionist Julia Skrajda.

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From this article you will learn:

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  • What is oxidative stress, free radicals and antioxidants.
  • .
  • What leads to oxidative stress and how it manifests itself.
  • What the effects of oxidative stress are.
  • What are the health effects of untreated oxidative stress.
  • .
  • How to combat this dangerous condition.
  • .

See also:

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What is oxidative stress?

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Oxidative stress is a condition when there are too many free radicals (unstable molecules) in the body and not enough antioxidants (antioxidants). The job of antioxidants is to neutralise free radicals. Failure to do so leads to cellular damage, which leads, for example, to the ageing of the bodyand.

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Free radicals are highly unstable, active and aggressive molecules. They exhibit a strong need to vent their energy.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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What are free radicals?

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Free radicals are unstable and highly reactive molecules that can be compared to small children with matches - they can cause a lot of damage if they are lost to control. In the body, free radicals can attack and damage cells, proteins, fats or DNAand. They act as 'rust' to the body, accelerating its ageing and putting it at risk of various diseases.

And what are antioxidants (antioxidants)?

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Luckily, you have a special defence system in your body. Its army is antioxidants (antioxidants) that neutralise free radicalsand. When the armia stops giving, oxidative stress occurs in the body.

The most important antioxidants are:

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This is just a small cluster of your soldiers. In fact, there are thousands of substances in the body that exhibit antioxidant activity.

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The main free radical scavengers are primarily vitamins A, D, E and vitamin C, as well as carotenoids and flavonoids, but also organic acids and selenium.

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Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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What are the causes of oxidative stress? 

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Oxidative stress can be caused by many different factors. To give you a good illustration of this, I have prepared a table which is divided into types of factors and specific causes.

Type of factors

Causes of oxidative stressand

Environmental

Dietary

  • Eating unhealthy, highly processed foods
  • .
  • Dietary imbalance, insufficient intake of antioxidants (e.g. vitamins A, C, E)
  • .
  • Smoking
  • .
  • Alcohol consumption
  • .

Physiological

  • Biochemical processes leading to the natural production of free radicals
  • .
  • Aging
  • .

Pathological

  • Inflammatory conditions
  • .
  • Diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases or certain cancers
  • .

Emotional

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  • Permanent stress
  • .
  • Depression, anxiety and other emotional states affecting body homeostasis
  • .

Genetic

  • Some gene mutations can lead to imbalances in the body and increase susceptibility to oxidative stress
  • .
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Oxidative stress can be caused by certain contraceptive drugs, antidepressants or steroids. Of course, this does not mean that you should stop taking them. However, remember to increase your antioxidant barrier then and nullify the other free radical triggers.
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Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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Oxidative stress - symptoms

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Symptoms of oxidative stress primarily include fatigue, weakness, concentration problems and headaches, joint and muscle pain. Other symptoms that can also indicate an excess of free radicals include constipation, rashes, digestive and immune problems and inflammation.

Symptoms of oxidative stressand:

  • Fatigue and weakness. Oxidative stress can affect the energy production of cells and lead to feelings of fatigue or weakness.
  • Fatigue and weakness.
  • Problems with concentration. Damage to nerve cells caused by oxidative stress can lead to problems with memory or concentration.
  • Can't help.
  • Muscle and joint pain. Free radicals can affect muscle and joint cells, which will lead to pain.
  • .
  • Immune system problems. Oxidative stress can affect immune system function, increase susceptibility to infection and hinder the body's ability to cope with disease.
  • Permanent headaches. Free radicals lead to damage to nerve tissues and affect muscle tone, which may be one of the factors leading to chronic headaches.
  • Free radicals lead to damage to nerve tissues and affect muscle tone, which may be one of the factors leading to chronic headaches.
  • Dermal rashes. These can result from allergic reactions, inflammation and damage to skin cells caused by oxidative stress. At the same time, inflammation leads to even more oxidative stress, so react quickly.
  • .
  • Inflammation. Reactive oxygen molecules (ROS) can lead to inflammation in the body, and chronic inflammation increases ROS production. This interaction can lead to an inflammatory cycle and exacerbate oxidative stress.
  • .

Remember that any of the symptoms listed can also be the result of other problems, unrelated to oxidative stress. If these symptoms are present, seek medical attention for a proper diagnosis.

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Ultraviolet (UV) radiation promotes the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), which causes skin damage. The cosmetic industry has adopted a strategy of incorporating antioxidants into sunscreen formulations. This helps to prevent or minimise UV-induced oxidative damage, increase the effectiveness of photoprotection and mitigate skin photo-ageing.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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What can the effects of oxidative stress be?

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Unmediated oxidative stress leads to the development of many diseases. The most common effects of this condition include neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and liver problems. Oxidative stress also results in thyroid problems and accelerated organ ageing.

Cell damage

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Oxidative stress results in damage to proteins, lipids and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), negatively affecting cell function. The result can be:

  • Neurodegeneration. Damage to nerve cells can lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's or multiple sclerosisand.
  • Cardiovascular diseases. Problems with vascular and myocardial endothelial cells can lead to cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke .
  • Chronic inflammation and immune system problems. Cell damage can result in chronic inflammation and immune system disorders. This leads to autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosusand.
  • .
  • Diabetes. When pancreatic cells degrade, insulin production or secretion can be impaired, resulting in type 1 or type 2 diabetes .
  • .
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The first and usually non-obvious symptoms of conditions such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease appear up to 20 years before the characteristic symptoms of the conditions in question. This mainly indicates that the disease progresses over a very long period of time and permanent exposure to oxidative stress increases the risk of severe symptoms appearing more quickly.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Metabolic disorders

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Metabolic disorders associated with oxidative stress include a wide range of abnormalities in biochemical processes and the ability of cells to convert nutrients into energy. Cellular damage caused by oxidative stress can lead to a variety of metabolic disorders, such as:

  • Obesity. Oxidative stress can affect the ability of cells to store and convert lipids and the regulation of weight-control processes by hormones such as insulin and leptin. This can lead to poor management of body fat, resulting in obesityand.
  • Metabolic syndrome. This condition includes a number of related metabolic disorders such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure and an abnormal lipid profile. All of these are associated with oxidative stress, which leads to the disruption of cells and tissues that are key to maintaining metabolic balanceand.
  • Hepatic problems. Oxidative stress can affect liver cell function, leading to abnormal lipid metabolism, damage to the liver and ultimately to cirrhosis. An example of a condition in which oxidative stress plays an important role is non-alcoholic fatty hepatitisand.
  • Thyroid diseases. Excess free radicals can adversely affect the functioning of thyroid cells, leading to an inability to produce adequate amounts of thyroid hormones or a dysregulation of metabolic processes. This can result in diseases such as hashimoto's, hypothyroidism or hypothyroidismand.
  • .
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Fat tissue itself is also an inflammatory factor in the body.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Acceleration of the ageing process

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Acceleration of ageing processes associated with oxidative stress can lead to a variety of negative consequences for health and quality of life:

  • The skin. Damage to proteins, lipids and collagen by free radicals can lead to a loss of skin elasticity, the formation of wrinkles or age spotsand.
  • Organ ageing. Oxidative stress affects organ function, leading to a reduction in heart, lung, kidney or liver function. This can result in age-related diseases and an overall decrease in quality of lifeand.
  • .
  • Loss of vitality. Accelerated ageing can result in increased fatigue, diminished vitality, reduced physical endurance and decreased cognitive function and concentration .
  • .
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It is not only the lungs that are affected in smokers. Cigarette smoke is fatal to hair, skin and nails. And the ingested tar reacts further. I think it may come as a big surprise that in smokers, one of the most common cancers is bladder cancer.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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What is sperm oxidative stress?

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Increased oxidative stress can lead to reduced sperm quality, sperm DNA damage and impaired sperm motility. This affects a couple's ability to conceive and contribute to infertilityand.

Sperm oxidative stress can be minimised by counteracting and supporting with methods such as a healthy diet rich in antioxidants, exercise and avoiding excessive stress.

Oxidative stress - a study

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There is no specific test to examine oxidative stress. The condition can be detected by checking the level of free radical damage and the antioxidant capacity of the body.

One of the most important blood tests in determining oxidative stress is the determination of glutathione levels. Glutathione is the body's natural antioxidant, and its measurement can assess the body's ability to fight oxidative stress.

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Hormone management is very important in the fight against free radicals. That is why it is worthwhile to test your hormones regularly. We are talking about both cortisol and thyroid hormones, as well as female hormones related to the menstrual cycle.
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Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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How to treat oxidative stress

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Treating oxidative stress focuses on preventing, protecting and returning to adequate amounts of antioxidants in the body. How to avoid oxidative stress?

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  • Consume a healthy diet. Eating foods rich in antioxidants, such as vitamins A, C, E, selenium and resveratrol, can help fight free radicals and promote cell regenerationand.
  • Supplementation. Taking collagen supplements, which contain antioxidants, can support protective processes in the body.
  • .
  • Physical activity. Regular physical activity can increase antioxidant levels in the bodyand.
  • .
  • Stress reduction. Practicing relaxation techniques such as meditation, yoga and deep breathing can help balance hormones and reduce oxidative stress .
  • Good habits. Avoiding alcohol, tobacco and drugs is an important step in protecting the body from developing oxidative stress. It is also essential to have regular prophylactic blood tests to help assess your health and risk of oxidative stress-related diseasesand.
  • Adequate sleep. By getting enough sleep, you contribute to cell regeneration and restoration. Ensure you follow good sleep hygiene and ensure you get enough restand.
  • .

Remember that combating oxidative stress should be tailored to the individual. Therefore, always consult your doctor or a specialist who can help you prepare a suitable action plan.

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Regular physical activity helps protect against oxidative stress, but very intense exercise combined with a lack of recovery is the perfect combination that free radicals like.
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Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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Coffee and oxidative stress - can it help?

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Yes, coffee can help with oxidative stress. The beverage contains natural antioxidants that can positively affect free radicals. Compounds such as chlorogenic acid, coffee acid, ferulic acid are components of coffee and have the ability to neutralise oxidative stressand.

What herbs for oxidative stress?

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Herbs for oxidative stress can help support the body's protection against free radicals and enhance natural antioxidant mechanisms. Below is a list of several herbs that researchers believe may help reduce oxidative stress:

  • Ashwagandha - an adaptogen that boosts stress resistance and has anti-inflammatory effectsand.
  • Marjoram biloba - acts as a powerful antioxidant and improves blood circulation .
  • Curcumin - has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties due to its curcumin content .
  • Green tea - contains polyphenols, especially EGCG, which have powerful antioxidant properties .
  • .
  • Astragalus - the root of this herb has antioxidant and adaptogenic properties .
  • Melissa - has sedative and antioxidant effects .
  • .

Remember that it is always a good idea to consult your doctor or pharmacist before using these herbs to reduce oxidative stress.

What supplements to choose for oxidative stress?

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The best supplements for oxidative stress include: coenzyme Q10 and vitamins B2, C, D and E, as well as selenium, zinc, lycopene, glutathione. You can also try adaptogens to support inner calm, such as ashwagandha. Other solutions include CBD oils, which can also support the fight against stressand.

Foods rich in antioxidants (antioxidants)?

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The main way to combat oxidative stress is to eat plenty of antioxidant-rich foods. Below you will find a table that includes the best antioxidants.

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Product type

Specific foodsand

Fruits

  • Berries
  • Granate
  • Strawberries
  • Blueberries
  • Citrus (oranges, grapefruit, lemons, tangerines)
  • Citrus (oranges, grapefruit, lemons, tangerines)
  • .

Vegetables

  • Spinach
  • .
  • Cabbage (mainly red)
  • .
  • Fasola
  • Archives
  • Kale

Nuts, seeds, legumes

  • Walnuts and pecans
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  • Almonds
  • .
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Flaxseed
  • Flaxseeds
  • Flaxseeds
  • Chia seeds
  • .

Spices and herbs

  • Turmeric rhizome (powdered as turmeric)
  • .
  • Cloves
  • .
  • Cinnamon
  • Oregano
  • Basil

Beverages

  • Green tea
  • Black tea
  • .
  • Coffee
  • Red wine (in moderation)
  • .
  • Lemon juice
  • .

Other

  • Bitter chocolate (with high cocoa content)
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  • Olive oil
  • Honey
  • Seafood
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  • Tofu
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The best sources of antioxidants are vegetables and fruit. When it comes to fat-soluble vitamins (ADEK), it is worth eating offal, liver, eggs, fish, but also dairy products.
Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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Is astaxanthin a good antioxidant?

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Yes, astaxanthin is considered to be a very good antioxidant. Astaxanthin is a carotenoid, which is a naturally occurring pigment responsible for the reddish colour in seafood such as shrimp and salmon.

Astaxanthin is a carotenoid, which is a naturally occurring pigment responsible for the reddish colour in seafood such as shrimp and salmon.

Dietary supplements for oxidative stress

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The most powerful antioxidant

ALINESS Natural Astaxanthin

ALINESS Natural Astaxanthin
4.9
  • Active ingredients: astaxanthin
  • .
  • Dosage: 1 capsule daily with a meal
  • .
  • Packaging size: 60 capsules
  • Sufficient for: 60 days
See price
in the Empik shop
Product description

A very simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient. This is astaxanthin, which, according to preliminary studies, is considered to be the most powerful antioxidant. This ingredient belongs to the group of carotenoidsós and has been shown to support the immune system and to have a beneficial effect on the skinós condition.

Astaxanthin is a simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient.

Pros and cons

A very simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient. This is astaxanthin, which, according to preliminary studies, is considered to be the most powerful antioxidant. This ingredient belongs to the group of carotenoidsós and has been shown to support the immune system and to have a beneficial effect on the skinós condition.

Astaxanthin is a simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient.

Additional information

A very simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient. This is astaxanthin, which, according to preliminary studies, is considered to be the most powerful antioxidant. This ingredient belongs to the group of carotenoidsós and has been shown to support the immune system and to have a beneficial effect on the skinós condition.

Astaxanthin is a simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient.

Expert opinion

A very simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient. This is astaxanthin, which, according to preliminary studies, is considered to be the most powerful antioxidant. This ingredient belongs to the group of carotenoidsós and has been shown to support the immune system and to have a beneficial effect on the skinós condition.

Astaxanthin is a simple dietary supplement containing only one ingredient.

A collection of powerful antioxidants

Solgar Advanced Antioxidant Formula

Solgar Advanced Antioxidant Formula
4.9
  • Active ingredients: vitamin C, vitamin E, L-cysteine, vitamin B2, selenium, manganese, plant complex and others
  • .
  • Dosage: 1 capsule daily
  • .
  • Packaging size: 60 capsules
  • Sufficient for: 60 days
See price
in the Empik shop
Product description

Advanced Antioxidant Formula from Solgar is a dietary supplement consisting of numerous antioxidantsów. In addition to vitamins, the formula also contains plant extracts and minerals in its composition. Antioxidant protection from Solgar can effectively support the fight against free radicals.

Pros and cons

Advanced Antioxidant Formula from Solgar is a dietary supplement consisting of numerous antioxidantsów. In addition to vitamins, the formula also contains plant extracts and minerals in its composition. Antioxidant protection from Solgar can effectively support the fight against free radicals.

Additional information

Advanced Antioxidant Formula from Solgar is a dietary supplement consisting of numerous antioxidantsów. In addition to vitamins, the formula also contains plant extracts and minerals in its composition. Antioxidant protection from Solgar can effectively support the fight against free radicals.

Vegan antioxidants

ALINESS PQQ

ALINESS PQQ
4.8
  • Active ingredients: PQQ, coenzyme Q10.
  • .
  • Dosage:1 capsule daily
  • .
  • Package size: 60 capsules
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 60 days
  • .
See price
in the Empik shop
Product description

A simple dietary supplement with two active ingredients. Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like compound thatóry supports the creation of energy in the cells. On the other hand, PQQ, or pyrroloquinolinquinone, is one of the more powerful antioxidantsów. It supports nervous system function, memory, concentration and cognitive function.
PQQ and coenzyme Q10 act synergistically, thus having a more beneficial effect on the body.

Pros and cons

A simple dietary supplement with two active ingredients. Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like compound thatóry supports the creation of energy in the cells. On the other hand, PQQ, or pyrroloquinolinquinone, is one of the more powerful antioxidantsów. It supports nervous system function, memory, concentration and cognitive function.
PQQ and coenzyme Q10 act synergistically, thus having a more beneficial effect on the body.

Additional information

A simple dietary supplement with two active ingredients. Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like compound thatóry supports the creation of energy in the cells. On the other hand, PQQ, or pyrroloquinolinquinone, is one of the more powerful antioxidantsów. It supports nervous system function, memory, concentration and cognitive function.
PQQ and coenzyme Q10 act synergistically, thus having a more beneficial effect on the body.

Efficient packaging

NOW FOODS Beta-Carotene 15 mg

NOW FOODS Beta-Carotene 15 mg
4.8
  • Active ingredients: Vitamin A (beta-carotene), vitamin E, soy lecithin
  • .
  • Dosage: 1 capsule daily
  • .
  • Package size: 180 capsules
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 180 days
  • .
See price
in the Ceneo shop
Product description

Vitamin antioxidants in the form of beta-carotene and vitamin E. The formula particularlyólly supports the health of the skinóry, preventing its ageing. It also has a positive effect on overall antioxidant protection, vision health, weakened immunity and hairós condition.

Antioxidants from NOW FOODS also include soy lecithin, whichóra supports nervous system and brain function and improves memory and concentration.

Pros and cons

Vitamin antioxidants in the form of beta-carotene and vitamin E. The formula particularlyólly supports the health of the skinóry, preventing its ageing. It also has a positive effect on overall antioxidant protection, vision health, weakened immunity and hairós condition.

Antioxidants from NOW FOODS also include soy lecithin, whichóra supports nervous system and brain function and improves memory and concentration.

Additional information

Vitamin antioxidants in the form of beta-carotene and vitamin E. The formula particularlyólly supports the health of the skinóry, preventing its ageing. It also has a positive effect on overall antioxidant protection, vision health, weakened immunity and hairós condition.

Antioxidants from NOW FOODS also include soy lecithin, whichóra supports nervous system and brain function and improves memory and concentration.

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See also:

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Summary

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  • Oxidative stress is a condition when there are more free radicals than antioxidants in the body.
  • Oxidative stress is a condition when there are more free radicals than antioxidants in the body.
  • The most common causes of oxidative stress are air pollution, UV exposure or inappropriate lifestyles.
  • .
  • Symptoms of oxidative stress include fatigue, concentration problems or headaches.
  • .
  • In the long term, oxidative stress leads to diseases of the nervous and cardiac systems, metabolic disorders and accelerated ageing.
  • Treatment of oxidative stress includes, among other things, a healthy diet, physical activity and good sleep.
  • .
  • Foods that will help you combat oxidative stress include dark chocolate, spinach and citrus.
  • .
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FAQ

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. What diseases can stress cause?

Stress can cause many diseases, such as:

  • Hypertension - take care with regular rest and relaxation exercises.
  • Hypertension - take care with regular rest and relaxation exercises.
  • Diabetes - control sugar levels and lead a healthy lifestyle.
  • Diabetes - control sugar levels and lead a healthy lifestyle.
  • Heart disease - be physically active and maintain a work-life balance.
  • .
  • Gastrointestinal disorders - introduce a healthy diet and eat regularly.
  • .
  • Insomnia - apply the principles of sleep hygiene and avoid 'stimulants' before bed, such as excessive exercise.
  • Reduced immunity - strengthen your immune system with a healthy lifestyle.
  • .

Stress affects the whole body, so managing it properly helps reduce the risk of these diseases.

. What is oxygen shock?.

Oxygen shock is a condition in which cells are damaged by higher than normal oxidised molecules called free radicals. To counteract oxygen shock:

  • Consume foods rich in antioxidants, such as fruit, vegetables and nuts.
  • Consume foods rich in antioxidants.
  • Avoid exposure to air pollutants and tobacco smoke.
  • Exercise regularly, but do not eat foods rich in antioxidants.
  • Exercise regularly, but without overloading.
  • .
  • Reduce stress by introducing relaxation techniques such as meditation.
  • .

Healthy lifestyles help protect cells from oxygen shock.

. What does stress do to our joints?.

Stress affects joints in various ways:

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  • Muscle tension - relax muscles using stretching, rolling or massage (e.g. on an acupressure mat)
  • Chronic inflammation - avoid processed foods, which can increase inflammation.
  • Weakened immune system - ensure a healthy diet, sleep and exercise to support the immune system.

Protect your joints from excessive stress by reducing the risk of joint problems such as arthritis.

. How to protect yourself from oxidative stress.

To protect yourself from oxidative stress:

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  • Eat antioxidant-rich foods - eat fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.
  • Eat antioxidant-rich foods - eat fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.
  • Limit exposure to toxins - avoid air pollutants and tobacco smoke.
  • Regularly exercise - do moderate exercise.
  • .
  • Care for healthy sleep - maintain regular bedtimes and ensure adequate sleep.
  • .
  • Apply relaxation techniques - incorporate meditation, yoga or deep breathing.

Implementing these changes to your lifestyle will help to reduce oxidative stress.

. What fruits are high in antioxidants?.

The following are fruits rich in antioxidants:

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  • Berries - consume berries such as blueberries, raspberries or blackberries.
  • Fruits that are rich in antioxidants.
  • Strawberries - eat regularly when they are seasonal.
  • Strawberries - eat regularly when they are seasonal.
  • Sour cherries - rich in anthocyanins, which reduce oxidative stress.
  • .
  • Blackcurrants - full of vitamin C and polyphenols.
  • Grapes - add purple and red grapes, rich in resveratrol, to your diet. Note, if you are diabetic, be careful - grapes are a glucose bomb.
  • .
  • Granates - eat especially their juicy seeds.
  • .

Addition of these fruits to the diet supports protection against oxidative stress.

. What is hyperventilation?.

Hyperventilation is rapid, shallow breathing that leads to a decrease in blood carbon dioxide levels. To control hyperventilation:

  • Apply the abdominal breathing technique - placing your hand on your abdomen, breathe slowly, filling your lungs with air.
  • Use the abdominal breathing technique.
  • Use the 4-7-8 technique - inhale through the nose on a 4, hold the breath on a 7, exhale through the mouth on an 8.
  • .
  • Try meditation - concentrate on your breathing to calm your thoughts.
  • Consider yoga exercises - they help you learn to control your breathing.
  • .

Regular use of these techniques can help to manage hyperventilation.

. How to get rid of cortisol from the body.

To get rid of cortisol from the body, use these methods:

  • Sleep regularly. Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep, as rest reduces cortisol concentrations.
  • Exercise.
  • Exercise. Do moderate to vigorous exercise on a regular basis.
  • Reduce cortisol levels.
  • Reduce stress. Try meditation, yoga or deep breathing.
  • Reduce stress.
  • Stay on a healthy diet. Consume protein, fibre and healthy fats and avoid processed foods.
  • Consume a healthy diet.
  • Use adaptogens. Consider using herbs such as ashwagandha or Rhodiola rosea.
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Sources

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. See all.

Achakulwisut, P., Anenberg, S. C., Neumann, J. E., Penn, S. L., Weiss, N., Crimmins, A., Fann, N., Martinich, J., Roman, H., & Mickley, L. J. (2019). Effects of Increasing Aridity on Ambient Dust and Public Health in the U.S. Southwest Under Climate Change. GeoHealth, 3(5), 127-144. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GH000187

Alexander, N. B., Taffet, G. E., Horne, F. M., Eldadah, B. A., Ferrucci, L., Nayfield, S., & Studenski, S. (2010). Bedside-to-Bench Conference: Research Agenda for Idiopathic Fatigue and Aging. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(5), 967-975. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02811.x

Baratta, F., Pastori, D., Bartimoccia, S., Cammisotto, V., Cocomello, N., Colantoni, A., Nocella, C., Carnevale, R., Ferro, D., Angelico, F., Violi, F., & Del Ben, M. (2020). Poor Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Are Associated with Oxidative Stress in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Nutrients, 12(6), Article 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061732

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