Proteins - what they are, in food, whether they are healthy for hair and what they do

Protein is one of the most important macronutrients in your diet.

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Marta Kaczorek - Reviewed byReviewed byMarta Kaczorek
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Proteins - what they are, in food, whether they are healthy for hair and what they do
15 May, 2024
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The name proteins comes from the Greek word proteios, meaning 'first' or 'important'. This is not surprising - proteins make up around 20% of human body weight and are considered by many to be one of the most important macronutrients in the diet.

That is why, together with clinical nutritionist Marta Kaczorek, we will present you with the most important information about them.

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From this article you will learn:

  • What proteins are, what they are made of and whether they are healthy.
  • .
  • What functions proteins perform and how much you need to take in daily.
  • What foods are healthy and how much protein you need to take in.
  • Which foods provide the most proteins.
  • .
  • What are the symptoms of protein deficiency and excess.
  • What are the symptoms of protein deficiency and excess.
  • How to supplement protein so you don't harm yourself.
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See also:

What are proteins?

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Proteins, also known as proteins, are a large group of organic compounds made up of amino acids that are linked together in long chains. Proteins are essential for all processes in living organisms, which is why - according to nutritionist Marta Kaczorek - they are considered one of the most important macronutrients in the diet.

In animals and humans, proteins are important for growth and tissue repair. They are components of muscle, epidermis, hair and nails. In addition to their structural function, proteins are also involved in a number of biological processes.

Proteins are also important in the repair of tissues.

For example, enzymes, which are a type of protein, catalyse chemical reactions in the body and are responsible for cellular metabolism. On the other hand, antigens and antibodies, which are also proteins, are integral components of the immune system.

The immune system is also a part of the immune system.

The structures, and therefore the functions, of proteins are determined by the sequence of amino acids that make them up. Although there are 20 standard amino acids in nature (12 endogenous and 8 exogenous), their different combinations give rise to millions of possible proteins, allowing for a huge variety of tasks that proteins perform.

Protein structure and thus function.

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The human body is made up of as much as 20% protein, and 3% of this pool is replaced and remodelled every day.
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Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorekclinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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What are the types of protein?

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There are around 20,000 types of protein. But rest assured - I'm not going to describe them all. In fact, it is not even known exactly how many there are. Scientists have estimated this number based on the hypothesis "one gene = one protein". Several types of proteins are most important for the body to function properly. Which ones?

  • Structural proteins. These proteins are like the 'bricks' of your body. They form structures that are an important part of tissues and organs. Take, for example, collagen, which is the most common protein in the human body. Collagen gives structure to skin, hair, nails, bones and tendons, forming their 'skeleton'.
  • Enzymes. Enzymes are biological catalysts. They facilitate and speed up the chemical reactions that take place in the body. For example, enzymes in the digestive system help break down the food you eat into small molecules that the body is able to assimilate.
  • Enzymes.
  • Protein hormones. Hormones are chemical signals that move through the body, passing messages between different cells and organs. Some hormones, like insulin, are proteins. Insulin regulates the concentration of sugar in the blood, which is essential for the healthy functioning of the body.
  • .
  • Antigens. Proteins that are recognised by the immune system. These are often foreign particles, such as those on the surface of bacteria or viruses. When the immune system detects these antigens, it initiates a defence response.
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  • Antibodies. Antibodies are proteins that the immune system produces to fight antigens. Each antibody is designed to bind to a specific antigen, which allows the immune system to eliminate intruders.
  • Antibodies are the proteins that the immune system produces to eliminate intruders.
  • Transport proteins. These proteins bind and carry various substances in the body. Haemoglobin in your red blood cells, which transports oxygen, is one example of such a protein.
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Equally important are motor proteins, which include myosin and actin. They are very important for the body to work properly as they make up the muscles - without them there would be no muscle contractions.
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Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorekclinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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What are proteins made of?

Proteins are made up of tiny 'building blocks' called amino acids. It's like building a beaded bracelet out of different shapes and colours of beads - these beads are your amino acids. When you combine the beads (amino acids) in different combinations and sequences, you get different bracelets (proteins).

There are a total of 20 different amino acids that the body can combine in thousands of combinations to make different proteins that perform different functions in your body.

Are proteins healthy?

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Yes, proteins are healthy and even essential for the body to function properly. They are some of the key nutrients your body needs to build muscle, bone, skin and hair. Proteins also perform many functions in the body, such as repairing cells, producing enzymes and hormones, and supporting the immune system.

What proteins do - properties

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Proteins are some of the most essential components of your diet. They perform hundreds of functions, but rest assured - you'll find only the most important ones below. How do proteins work?

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Build tissues

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One of the most important functions of proteins is to build and repair damaged tissues. They are responsible for the structure of your body and keeping it whole.

  • Building and structure. Proteins are the basic building blocks of all tissues and organs in the body, as protein forms every cell membrane. For example, keratin forms hair and nails, collagen is responsible for skin, tendons, cartilage and bone, and actin and myosin form muscles. Without proteins, your body could not maintain its structure.
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  • Tissue repair. Proteins also have important functions in repairing damaged tissues. For example, when you have a wound, proteins (in this case collagen) create a 'scaffold' for new cells to fill the wound region. This is particularly important just during skin fusion, as well as tissue regeneration after injury or disease, and in processes such as muscle growth after exercise.

Transport substances

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Transport of various substances in the body is crucial to its proper functioning. Proteins have an important function in this process. Which proteins are particularly important?

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  • Channel proteins. These proteins enable the transport of ions and other small molecules across the cell membrane. Channel proteins form a channel across the membrane, allowing specific molecules to pass through.
  • Binding proteins. Binding proteins, also known as transport proteins, bind specific molecules and allow them to be transported to another part of the cell or to a completely different cell. For example, insulin is a binding protein that transports glucose into muscle cells.
  • Carrier proteins. Carrier proteins attach to specific molecules, change their shape and then carry these molecules across the cell membrane.
  • Transforming proteins and enzymes. Some proteins not only carry molecules but also transform them. Enzymes are proteins that speed up chemical reactions, enabling the conversion of one type of molecule to another.

They speed up chemical reactions

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Proteins that speed up chemical reactions are enzymes. Enzymes are biological catalysts, lowering the energy required to activate given reactions. Activation energy is the minimum amount of energy required to initiate a particular chemical reaction.

The mechanism of action of enzymes involves the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex, in which the substrate binds to a special site on the enzyme, called the active site. This specificity of alignment is akin to fitting a key into a lock. The enzyme active site is usually complementary to the substrate in both shape and electrical charge.

The new enzyme-substrate complex usually stabilises the transition state of the reaction and lowers the energy barrier, allowing the chemical reaction to proceed faster. Enzymes can also accelerate reactions by more direct mechanisms, such as effects on the electrostatic field.

The enzymes can also accelerate reactions by more direct mechanisms, such as effects on the electrostatic field.

Despite accelerating the reaction, the enzyme itself remains unchanged after the reaction is completed and is able to accelerate subsequent processes. This is a very important characteristic of enzymes, allowing them to support the proper functioning of many biochemical cycles.

Protecting enzymes is a very important feature of enzymes.

Protect the body against threats

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Proteins have an important function in protecting the body against various threats. As essential components of all cells, they are involved in various processes such as tissue construction, regulation of metabolic processes and, above all, immune defence. They are responsible for the production of antibodies that identify and neutralise pathogens.

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Antibodies are the proteins that are produced by the immune system.

Protein types

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What do they do

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Antibodies

Antibodies are pathogen-specific proteins that are produced by cells of the immune system - B lymphocytes. Their main task is to 'recognise' and bind to foreign bodies such as viruses, bacteria or toxins in order to destroy them or mark them as a target for other immune cells.

Enzymes

Enzymes are proteins that speed up various biochemical reactions in the body. Many of them are responsible for converting toxins into less harmful substances or even detoxifying them completely. In this way, they keep you safe at a cellular level.

Protein transporters

These proteins are responsible for moving various molecules in the body. For example, haemoglobin - a protein in red blood cells - carries oxygen from the lungs to all cells in the body. Other transport proteins can also carry nutrients, hormones or ions.

Signalling proteins

Signalling proteins, such as hormones or cytokines, have the ability to communicate between cells, allowing the coordination of many biological processes. Among other things, they can modulate the immune response - either signalling the need to attack a pathogen or inhibiting an excessive immune response.

Regulatory proteins

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Proteins that regulate gene expression, the process by which the information in genes is 'read out' to produce new proteins. Examples include transcription factors, which bind to DNA and regulate which genes are to be activated or deactivated. In this way, they influence the health of the organism at the molecular level.

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Some proteins have antioxidant effects. For example, glutathione is a very powerful antioxidant, which is quickly depleted when there is a lot of "pollution" in the body. This is when it is worth reaching for glutathione supplementation.
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Marta Kaczorek.

Marta Kaczorekclinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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Regulate gene action

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Proteins are important in regulating gene function, and the process is quite complex. Let's start with what gene regulation actually means. Genes contain information about the construction of proteins that are essential for the body to function properly. So gene function regulation is basically deciding which proteins to produce, when and how intensively.

The best-known proteins that regulate gene function are transcription factors. They exercise control over which genes are active. It's a bit like using a light switch to decide when genes 'light up' (are active) or 'go off' (are inactive).

This is very important, as they are the most important proteins for gene function.

This is very important, as this regulation affects your daily life. For example, if the genes responsible for insulin production are switched off (and they should be switched on), we have a problem processing sugar from the diet, which can lead to diabetes.

Other proteins, known as histones, affect how tightly 'coiled' your DNA is. Some genes can be so 'compressed' by histones that they are invisible to the body's genetic machinery. This affects the body's responses to various situations. For example, if the genes responsible for fighting infections are too tightly "compressed", you can become ill more easily.

Proteins also regulate genes in dozens of other ways. However, these are complex chemical reactions. For you, the most important thing is to maintain a proper diet, rich in protein. This will ensure that your genes function properly.

Proteins for hair

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Proteins are the basic building blocks of the human body, including hair. Proteins have the ability to regenerate, rebuild and replenish deficiencies in the structure of the hair strands. They help to bring out the natural curl of the hair, add volume and a healthy, desirable shine.

What do proteins do for hair?

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  • Keratin. This is an essential component of hair, which is primarily responsible for its strength and elasticity. Keratin also supports the hair's protection against external factors.
  • Keratin.
  • Collagen. A protein whose main function is to provide hair with adequate moisture. It also contributes to increasing its elasticity, making hair less susceptible to mechanical damage.
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  • Elastin. Is responsible for the elasticity of the hair. It makes the hair more resistant to breakage and damage, which translates into less susceptibility to breakage and splitting.

In what form can you use protein on your hair?

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Proteins can be used on the hair in various forms - as an ingredient in shampoos, conditioners, masks or serums. Equally valuable may prove to be collagen dietary supplements.

  • Shampoos with proteins. Shampoos with added proteins make hair stronger already during washing. Using such a shampoo will help to rebuild the structure of the hair, while also cleansing it of impurities.
  • Protein conditioners and masks. Protein conditioners and masks provide your hair with the necessary nutrients. Used regularly, they will improve their condition, making them stronger, thicker and shinier.
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  • Protein serum. Protein serum is recommended especially for damaged hair. You can apply the serum to both wet and dry hair to intensively moisturise and regenerate dry ends.
  • Protein supplements. Protein supplementation is also a great idea. Particularly valuable is collagen supplementation. You can find this protein in both tablets and drinking powder or liquid.
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How to prepare homemade hair proteins.

One of the most popular ways to make homemade hair protein is a mask made from egg, coconut oil and olive oil. How do you prepare it?

Ingredients:

  • 1 hen's egg
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  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
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  • 1 tbsp olive oil
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Preparation:

  1. Crack an egg into a bowl. If your hair is oily, use just the egg white alone. But if it's dried out - use the whole egg.
  2. Add a tablespoon of oil.
  3. Add a tablespoon of coconut oil and olive oil. Both oils are great for moisturising and nourishing your hair.
  4. Blend the ingredients until smooth.
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  6. Apply the mixture to dry hair, from roots to ends.
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  8. Let it sit on your hair for 15-30 minutes. If you want the process to be more intense, you can wear a cap or wrap your hair in a towel.
  9. Rinse well.
  10. Rinse your hair well with warm water. Apply conditioner to emulsify any remaining oils and keep it on your hair for at least 15 minutes. After this time, thoroughly shampoo your head with a mild shampoo to remove any residue.
  11. .
  12. Enjoy smooth, strong and healthy hair!
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How much to keep protein mask on your hair?

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How much to keep a protein mask on your hair depends on various factors, such as the condition of your hair and the type of mask. However, the most common recommendation is to leave it on for 15-30 minutes. This will usually allow the nutrients to be absorbed. For very damaged and dry hair, it may be necessary to leave the mask on for longer.

Golden protein for hair - what is it?

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Golden proteins for hair is a treatment that offers intensive nourishment and restoration of the hair structure. It involves the application of a special protein mask containing amino acids, plant extracts and keratin microparticles.

Golden proteins for hair.

When is it advisable to apply protein to the hair?

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This treatment is particularly recommended for those with dry, damaged, brittle, dull hair or hair that shows signs of damage from constant colouring, straightening or inadequate care.

The use of gold proteins on hair is not recommended.

Applying golden proteins to the hair can have a number of beneficial effects. Hair can become deeply moisturised, nourished and regenerated, and look shiny and resilient. Dry and dull hair, on the other hand, will be restored to shine and ragged ends will become smooth again.

How does the golden protein hair treatment look like?

The golden protein treatment begins with the application of a protein product to dry hair, which takes approximately 30-40 minutes to work. The hair is then washed with a mild shampoo and then a mask or conditioner is applied. After rinsing, the hair is dried with cool air. They can also be additionally straightened with a keratin straightener.

The cost of such a treatment ranges from £300 to £500, but the effects last up to six months, making it an investment worth considering for the health and beauty of the hair.

Emollients, humectants, proteins - extra support for hair

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Proteins are not everything. Emollients and humectants are also important for the health of your hair. All of them together support your strands to look shiny and healthy.

  • Emolients. Emollients, such as vegetable oils (e.g. coconut, olive, jojoba), act as a natural balm, softening your hair and adding shine. They form a protective layer on the surface of the hair, making it less vulnerable to mechanical damage and moisture loss.
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  • Humectants. Substances such as glycerine and aloe vera juice act like a magnet for water - they attract it from the environment, providing extra moisture to the hair. This makes hair less prone to dryness, which is particularly important for women who style their hair with a hairdryer, curling iron or straightener, or who colour it.

Emollients, humectants, proteins - order

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The order in which proteins, humectants and emollients are used can vary depending on the needs of your hair type. Nonetheless, one commonly suggested order is proteins to start, then humectants, and protective emollients at the very end.

Emolients, humectants, proteins - what order?

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  1. Proteins. Strengthen your hair with proteins at the beginning. This will help to reconstruct them and support their structure. You can use natural sources of protein, like eggs or yoghurt.
  2. Humectants. After applying protein, use humectants to draw moisture from the air into your hair. Good examples of humectants include aloe vera or glycerine.
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  4. Emollients. Finally, use emollients that will leave a protective layer on your hair, trapping moisture inside and adding shine outside. Emollients are, for example, vegetable oils.
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What is the daily requirement for protein?

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Daily protein requirements vary depending on age, weight, lifestyle and physiological status. The standard recommendation from the National Centre for Nutrition Education is an intake of 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight for a standard Smith. This translates into the following intake:

  • Person weighing 50 kg - 40 g protein
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  • Person weighing 60 kg - 48 g protein
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  • Person weighing 70 kg - 56 g protein
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  • Person weighing 80 kg - 64 g protein
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  • Person weighing 90 kg - 72 g protein
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Slightly different requirements exist for children, physically active people or pregnant women. How do you calculate your protein requirements then?

Who?

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Daily protein requirements

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Children aged 10-18 years

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ok. 1 gram of protein per kg of body weight

An adult (physically inactive) of normal body weight

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about 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight

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A physically active adult, involved in performance or strength sports

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about. 1.2-2.2 grams of protein per kg of body weight

Pregnant women

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ox. 1.2 grams per kg body weight

Breastfeeding women

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ox. 1.4 grams per kg of body weight

Persons over 65 years of age

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1 gram per kg of body weight, and in the case of malnutrition or chronic diseases 1.2-1.5 grams (or otherwise, if so advised by a doctor).

Resources of protein in the diet

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Proteins are mainly found in animal products. Their best sources are turkey, chicken and beef. Eggs, fish and dairy products are also equally valuable. Which foods do you find the most protein in?"

Proteins in food - table

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Product

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Protein content protein per 100 gand

Chicken breast

27 g

Beef

26 g

Herring

23 g

Soy

18 g

Flaxseed

18 g

Chewnuts

18 g

Egg

12 g

Chickpeas

9 g

Lentils

9 g

Red beans

8.7 g

Rice quinoa

4.4 g

Plant proteins

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Plant proteins are an important part of the diet, especially for vegans and vegetarians. Protein-rich foods for people who do not eat meat include:

  • Pulses - lentils, chickpeas, red beans, pinto beans, soybeans, quinoa.
  • Pulses  - lentils, chickpeas, red beans, soybeans, quinoa.
  • Nuts - almonds, walnuts, pistachios, cashews, hazelnuts.
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  • Seeds - flaxseeds, chia seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds.
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  • Cereals - quinoa, brown rice, oats, couscous, bulgur.
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  • Vegetables  - broccoli, spinach, asparagus, kale.
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Protein deficiency

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Protein deficiency is a condition in which the body lacks the proteins needed to function properly. This can lead to a variety of health problems, including muscle weakness, slowed growth, immune disorders and problems with nutrient absorption.

What are the causes of protein deficiency?

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Protein deficiency can have various causes. Some are related to diet and others to health factors. A protein-poor diet, digestive disorders, excessive alcohol consumption, chronic illness or certain medical conditions, such as kidney or liver failure, can all contribute to protein deficiency.

Causes of protein deficiency:

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  • Inadequate diet. Protein deficiency is most often due to insufficient intake of protein-rich foods, as well as the consumption of low-quality proteins.
    • Protein deficiency can be caused by the following reasons.
    • Digestive disorders. Disorders such as coeliac disease, food intolerances, as well as intestinal diseases can impede the proper absorption of proteins from the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, this can lead to protein deficiency in the body.
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    • Excessive alcohol consumption. Alcohol negatively affects the body's ability to absorb and assimilate proteins. Therefore, its excessive consumption may contribute to protein deficiency.
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    • Long-term illnesses. Kidney or liver failure can inhibit protein production and metabolism in the body. Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, can also affect protein absorption and assimilation.
    • Protein absorption.
    • Diseases and injuries. Serious infections, burns or trauma to the body can lead to a greater need for the body to regenerate and repair tissues, which in turn increases the need for protein. Protein deficiency can also be a result of cancer, which often affects the body's protein metabolism and consumption.
    • Aging. Elderly people may experience a natural decrease in appetite and reduced intake of protein foods, which may contribute to protein deficiency.
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    An inadequate supply of carbohydrates and fats in the diet is also one of the causes of protein deficiency. Its effect is to use protein as an energy source, so that it cannot be used for more important tasks in the body.
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    Marta Kaczorek.

    Marta Kaczorekclinical nutritionist and personal trainer

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    Symptoms of protein deficiency

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    Protein deficiency can lead to a variety of symptoms that affect health, fitness and general wellbeing. The most common symptoms indicative of a lack of protein in the body include lower muscle mass, weakened immunity, and fatigue. Sometimes there may also be poorer hair and nails, poorer wound healing, and impaired growth (in the youngest).

    Worsened immunity

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    Protein deficiency can lead to a weakened immune system. Proteins are essential for the proper functioning of the immune system, which protects you from infection and disease. When the body lacks proteins, it can produce fewer antibodies and weaken other immune cells, such as lymphocytes. This, in turn, increases your susceptibility to infection.

    Protein deficiency can also affect the inflammatory process, which is an important part of the immune response. Lack of adequate protein can hinder and delay inflammatory processes, which in turn can impair the body's ability to fight infections and impede wound healing.

    Protein deficiency can also affect the body's ability to fight infections and impede wound healing.

    Weakness of hair and nails

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    Weak, brittle hair and nails can also be a symptom of a protein deficiency. Proteins are essential for the production of keratin, the building block of hair and nails. If you notice that your hair is becoming weak, brittle, losing its natural shine and your nails are brittle and break easily, you may be dealing with a protein deficiency.

    Fatigue

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    Fatigue is often ignored as a symptom of a gruelling lifestyle, but it can also be an indication of a protein deficiency in the body. Protein, a fundamental component of all cells in the body, has a myriad of functions - from tissue repair to oxygen transport to the production of enzymes that regulate all metabolic processes.

    When the diet is low in protein, the body has to face negative consequences. One of these is a constant feeling of fatigue. This is due, among other things, to the fact that protein deficiency leads to a deficiency of iron, which in turn translates into less production of haemoglobin - the protein responsible for transporting oxygen to the tissues. Without adequate oxygen, your muscles and brain do not function properly, resulting in weakness and feelings of exhaustion.

    Limited muscle mass

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    Low muscle mass is one of the most noticeable symptoms of protein deficiency. Protein is important for building and repairing muscle in the body. When the body does not get enough protein, muscle-building processes may not take place properly.

    As a result, muscles may weaken and muscle mass may be reduced. Noticeably reduced muscle mass, especially despite regular training, may therefore suggest a protein deficiency. If this is the case, attention should be paid to the level of protein intake and consideration should be given to consulting a dietician or doctor.

    Growth disorders

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    Growth disorders can be one of the effects of protein deficiency, especially in children, where healthy eating habits are crucial for proper development. Proteins are important for the functioning of the body, including growth processes. They participate in the production of growth hormones and are indispensable for regeneration and tissue construction.

    When there is a lack of protein in the diet, the body can start to inhibit growth processes, resulting in delayed development. This can manifest as restricted growth, delayed puberty or stunted physical development.

    How to treat protein deficiency.

    How to treat protein deficiency?

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    Protein deficiency is a serious health problem that you should not take lightly. It can lead to disorders such as those mentioned above. What will allow you to combat it?

    • Increase your dietary protein intake. This is the most direct and easiest way to increase protein levels in your body. You can find protein in many sources, including meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk and dairy products, nuts, seeds, soya and some vegetables such as spinach and broccoli.
    • Use protein supplements. If you have difficulty getting enough protein from your diet for various reasons, you can use protein supplements. Remember, however, that these supplements should only be an addition to a balanced diet, not a substitute for it.
    • Consult a nutritionist. Professional help can be very valuable in the event of a protein deficiency. A dietitian can assess your current dietary style, suggest changes and create a personalised protein-rich diet plan.
    • Consult a dietitian.
    • Regular testsSystematic blood tests and other tests can help monitor protein levels and tailor a diet or treatment plan to the patient's needs.
    • Treatment of co-morbid conditions. In some cases, protein deficiency can result from other health problems, such as kidney or digestive conditions. These conditions require separate, specialised treatment.
    • .

    Remember that everyone is different, and what works for one person may not work for another. Therefore, it is always a good idea to consult your doctor or other healthcare professional for a treatment plan.

    Protein excess

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    An excess of protein in the diet is often as dangerous as a deficiency. Seen by some as the key to building muscle and maintaining a slender physique, consuming too much protein can lead to a range of health problems.

    Protein is the key to building muscle and maintaining a slender physique.

    Causes

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    Overconsumption of protein in the body is most often due to over-consumption of protein-rich foods or excessive use of supplements without proper consultation with a doctor, or nutritionist. It often results from trying to gain muscle mass quickly.

    What are the causes of excess protein?

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    • Overconsumption of meat, fish and dairy products.
    • Unchecked consumption of meat, fish and dairy products.
    • Unchecked use of protein supplements.
    • Unchecked use of protein supplements.
    • High-protein diets (e.g. Atkins diet, ketogenic diet).
    • Eating disorders (e.g. orthorexia).
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    What are the symptoms of excess protein?

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    An excess of protein in the body can lead to a variety of symptoms, which are usually due to a strain on the kidneys and digestive system. This most commonly includes abdominal discomfort, digestive problems, excessive weight loss and fatigue and weakness.

    Proteins are difficult to digest.

    Protein digestion is a process that requires more energy than other food components.

    Symptom

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    Characteristics

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    Abdominal complaints

    Most often they mean abdominal pain, bloating and unpleasant sensations, which can result from overloading the digestive system with excess protein.

    Digestion problems

    This is manifested by constipation or, less frequently, diarrhoea. Proteins are difficult to digest. Therefore, if consumed in excess, they can overload the digestive system.

    Excessive weight loss

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    Proteins increase the feeling of satiety, which can result in a smaller appetite and excessive weight loss.

    Proteins can increase the feeling of satiety, which can result in a smaller appetite and excessive weight loss.

    Fatigue and weakness

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    Digesting proteins is a process that requires more energy than occurs when digesting other food components. Therefore, it can lead to feelings of fatigue and lethargy.

    Kidney problems

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    An excess of protein also puts a strain on the kidneys, which are forced to filter elements of protein metabolism from the bloodstream. In the long term, this can lead to conditions such as kidney failure.

    The kidneys are also affected.

    Protein excess - treatment

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    Treatment of protein excess primarily involves a change in diet, as well as regular monitoring of the condition. It is equally important to consult a doctor or dietician to establish an individual and balanced nutrition plan.

    How to remove excess protein from the body?

    .
    • Decrease your protein intake. If the cause of excess protein in the body, is too much protein in the diet, you should reduce it. However, remember to do this gradually and under the supervision of a specialist. Otherwise you may fall from the rain into the gutter and develop a deficiency.
    • Get regular checks. With an excess of protein, it is important to have regular health checks. This most often includes blood tests and other tests to monitor kidney and digestive function. However, the decision on specific tests should be made by your doctor.
    • Take advice from a nutritionist. Professional advice can help tailor your diet to your individual needs and make sure all your nutritional needs are met.

    Protein supplementation

    .

    Protein supplementation is often used among athletes, physically active people, and those who struggle to get enough protein through food. It will help to replenish the body's protein levels if the daily diet does not provide sufficient amounts of these nutrients.

    Protein supplements - types

    .

    Protein supplements are available in a variety of forms and can come from many sources. Each has its own unique properties that can benefit different groups of people. Choosing the right form and source of protein depends on individual needs and preferences.

    • Whey protein. One of the most commonly used protein powder supplements and more. It contains all the essential amino acids and is easily digested. It is a particularly beneficial option for physically active people due to its fast absorption rate.
    • .
    • Casein protein. This is another product derived from milk. It takes longer to be absorbed by the body, which is why it is often recommended to be taken before bedtime.
    • Casein proteins.
    • Proteins from eggs. Protein from eggs is one of the more valuable sources of protein. It contains all the essential amino acids, which is why it is often added to various sports supplements.
    • Hemp protein. This vegan protein source not only contains all the essential amino acids, but also omega-3 acids and omega-6. Hemp protein is easily digested and can be a good alternative for those with allergies to other protein sources.
    • .
    • Soy protein. A good source of protein for vegans and vegetarians, as it also contains all the essential amino acids and is not meaty. Compared to whey protein, however, soy protein digests more slowly.
    • .
    • Protein from peas. Another option for those on a plant-based diet. Proteins from peas are slow-digesting proteins and have no allergenic effect.
    .
    Hemp protein is a good option for those with allergies, but (if taken solo) it is a poor form of protein. It has little leucine (i.e. a low leucine threshold, making other amino acids assimilated in small amounts), and not much protein content in protein.
    .
    Marta Kaczorek.

    Marta Kaczorekclinical nutritionist and personal trainer

    .
    .

    What are whey proteins?

    .

    Whey protein, also known as whey protein, is a component of milk obtained as a by-product during cheese production. Due to their high biological value, they are one of the most widely used supplements in the fitness world. Whey protein is available in three main forms: concentrate, isolate and hydrolysate.

    .

    The least processed form of whey protein.

    Isolate

    Isolate is a more processed product.

    Type of whey protein

    .

    What are its characteristics

    .

    Concentrate

    .

    The least processed type of whey protein. It contains between 30 and 82% protein along with some fat and lactose. It is usually the cheapest form of this supplement.

    Concentrate

    Isolate

    .

    A more processed product that contains at least 90-95% protein and minimal amounts of fat and lactose. It is easily digestible and ideal for those trying to consume as little fat as possible.

    Hydrolysate

    Enzymatically processed whey protein into the form that is most easily assimilated by the human body. The peptides of these proteins are rapidly absorbed, making hydrolysate an ideal choice for athletes who need a quick protein replenishment.

    Hydrolysate is an ideal choice for athletes who need a quick protein replenishment.

    Meta-analysis of studies

    A collection of 2016 studies, which included a total of 192 exercising individuals, examined the effects of whey protein supplementation on strength-training athletes. The research suggests, that taking these supplements can increase both muscle mass and strength. Furthermore, the effects of supplementation were even better when participants also took creatine.

    Best proteins - ranking

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    ALLNUTRITION VEGAN PROTEIN

    ALLNUTRITION VEGAN PROTEIN
    5.0
    • Protein type: vegetable
    • .
    • Package: 500 g
    • .
    • Number of servings per pack: 17
    • Protein per serving: 21 g
    • .
    Product description

    A vegan protein supplement in 3 delicious flavours, based on soy protein isolate and proteins from six other plants, which together make up to 75% pure protein in each serving.

    VEGAN PROTEIN

    VEGAN PROTEIN contains soy protein isolate, protein from pea, cranberry, rice, sunflower, almondów and hemp protein.

    .

    The supplement is not only for physically active people – it is an ideal source of protein if you do not have time for a valuable meal or do not count macronutrients in your diet. The tasty powder will also support your reduction – it will saturate you and protect you from losing muscle tissue.

    Pros and cons

    A vegan protein supplement in 3 delicious flavours, based on soy protein isolate and proteins from six other plants, which together make up to 75% pure protein in each serving.

    VEGAN PROTEIN

    VEGAN PROTEIN contains soy protein isolate, protein from pea, cranberry, rice, sunflower, almondów and hemp protein.

    .

    The supplement is not only for physically active people – it is an ideal source of protein if you do not have time for a valuable meal or do not count macronutrients in your diet. The tasty powder will also support your reduction – it will saturate you and protect you from losing muscle tissue.

    Additional information

    A vegan protein supplement in 3 delicious flavours, based on soy protein isolate and proteins from six other plants, which together make up to 75% pure protein in each serving.

    VEGAN PROTEIN

    VEGAN PROTEIN contains soy protein isolate, protein from pea, cranberry, rice, sunflower, almondów and hemp protein.

    .

    The supplement is not only for physically active people – it is an ideal source of protein if you do not have time for a valuable meal or do not count macronutrients in your diet. The tasty powder will also support your reduction – it will saturate you and protect you from losing muscle tissue.

    Expert opinion

    A vegan protein supplement in 3 delicious flavours, based on soy protein isolate and proteins from six other plants, which together make up to 75% pure protein in each serving.

    VEGAN PROTEIN

    VEGAN PROTEIN contains soy protein isolate, protein from pea, cranberry, rice, sunflower, almondów and hemp protein.

    .

    The supplement is not only for physically active people – it is an ideal source of protein if you do not have time for a valuable meal or do not count macronutrients in your diet. The tasty powder will also support your reduction – it will saturate you and protect you from losing muscle tissue.

    .

    ALLDEYNN VEGEROSE

    ALLDEYNN VEGEROSE
    4.9
    • Protein type: vegetable
    • .
    • Package: 500 g
    • .
    • Number of servings per pack: 16
    • Protein per serving: 15 g (white chocolate-raspberry and vanilla-berry), 14 g (chocolate)
    • .
    Product description

    A protein supplement made from five plant proteins enriched with acacia fibre, flaxseed, MCT oil and the probiotic-prebiotic complex LactoWise®. It is a synbiotic thatós stimulates the developmentóy and growth of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and shows a beneficial effect on the condition of the digestive system.

    Pros and cons

    A protein supplement made from five plant proteins enriched with acacia fibre, flaxseed, MCT oil and the probiotic-prebiotic complex LactoWise®. It is a synbiotic thatós stimulates the developmentóy and growth of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and shows a beneficial effect on the condition of the digestive system.

    Additional information

    A protein supplement made from five plant proteins enriched with acacia fibre, flaxseed, MCT oil and the probiotic-prebiotic complex LactoWise®. It is a synbiotic thatós stimulates the developmentóy and growth of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and shows a beneficial effect on the condition of the digestive system.

    Expert opinion

    A protein supplement made from five plant proteins enriched with acacia fibre, flaxseed, MCT oil and the probiotic-prebiotic complex LactoWise®. It is a synbiotic thatós stimulates the developmentóy and growth of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and shows a beneficial effect on the condition of the digestive system.

    ALLDEYNN WHEYROSE

    ALLDEYNN WHEYROSE
    4.7
    • Protein type: WPC (whey protein concentrate)
    • .
    • Package: 500 g
    • .
    • Number of servings per pack: 16
    • Protein per serving: 22.5 g (white chocolate), 21.9 g (peanut butter), 21.6 g (cookie)
    • .
    • Additional ingredients: DigeZyme® enzymes;
    • .
    Product description

    Protein supplement containing whey protein concentrate (WPC) with added digestive enzymesós. It digests well, is an easy and quick way to provide protein and can be consumed by people with lactose intolerance. It will work well not only as a stand-alone drinkóy but also as a tasty addition to shakesóy, dessertsóy, oatmeal or omeletóy.

    WHEYROSE contains five digestive enzymes that help break down macromolecules into smaller components, so that the ingredients from food and the nutrient are absorbed even better. This minimises or even eliminates digestive discomfort. Such an addition is rare in protein supplements.

    .
    Pros and cons

    Protein supplement containing whey protein concentrate (WPC) with added digestive enzymesós. It digests well, is an easy and quick way to provide protein and can be consumed by people with lactose intolerance. It will work well not only as a stand-alone drinkóy but also as a tasty addition to shakesóy, dessertsóy, oatmeal or omeletóy.

    WHEYROSE contains five digestive enzymes that help break down macromolecules into smaller components, so that the ingredients from food and the nutrient are absorbed even better. This minimises or even eliminates digestive discomfort. Such an addition is rare in protein supplements.

    .
    Additional information

    Protein supplement containing whey protein concentrate (WPC) with added digestive enzymesós. It digests well, is an easy and quick way to provide protein and can be consumed by people with lactose intolerance. It will work well not only as a stand-alone drinkóy but also as a tasty addition to shakesóy, dessertsóy, oatmeal or omeletóy.

    WHEYROSE contains five digestive enzymes that help break down macromolecules into smaller components, so that the ingredients from food and the nutrient are absorbed even better. This minimises or even eliminates digestive discomfort. Such an addition is rare in protein supplements.

    .
    User review

    Protein supplement containing whey protein concentrate (WPC) with added digestive enzymesós. It digests well, is an easy and quick way to provide protein and can be consumed by people with lactose intolerance. It will work well not only as a stand-alone drinkóy but also as a tasty addition to shakesóy, dessertsóy, oatmeal or omeletóy.

    WHEYROSE contains five digestive enzymes that help break down macromolecules into smaller components, so that the ingredients from food and the nutrient are absorbed even better. This minimises or even eliminates digestive discomfort. Such an addition is rare in protein supplements.

    .

    When to take protein - before or after a workout?

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    When you take protein does not matter. You can take protein both in the morning and in the evening, as well as before or after your workout. What matters most is the total amount of protein you consume throughout the day. Ensure that there is no less protein in each meal than 0.4 g/kg body weight - if your goal is to gain muscle mass.

    See also: Protein before or after training? A trainer explains

    Are proteins harmful?

    .

    No, protein is a very important nutrient for your body. Your body uses them to build tissues, regulate gene function or defend itself against pathogens.

    However, as with any dietary ingredient, excess protein can lead to health problems. Too much protein puts a strain on the kidneys, and can lead to digestive disorders, as well as promoting the formation of kidney stones.

    That is why it is important to take into account the importance of protein in your diet.

    This is why it is important to consume the right amount of protein according to your personal needs, and supplementation is best considered only after consulting a nutritionist. A balanced diet containing adequate amounts of all nutrients is the key to maintaining health.

    Summary

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    .
    • Proteins, also known as proteins, are organic compounds made up of amino acids that are crucial for the function of living organisms.
    • Proteins, among other things, build and repair tissues, transport substances in the body, speed up chemical reactions, protect against pathogens and regulate gene function.
    • Proteins are also known as proteins.
    • Proteins are also important for hair health; a protein treatment can nourish and rebuild hair structure.
    • .
    • The daily requirement for protein depends on age, body weight and lifestyle, with the prevailing rule of thumb being an intake of 0.8 grams per kg of body weight.
    • .
    • Protein comes mainly from animal products, but soya, flaxseed, cashew nuts, chickpeas, lentils and quinoa are also good sources of protein.
    • Protein deficiency is a major concern.
    • Protein deficiency manifests as muscle weakness, slowed growth, immune disorders and problems with nutrient absorption.
    • .
    • Excessive protein leads to, among other things, abdominal pain, digestive problems, excessive weight loss and fatigue and weakness.
    • Protein supplementation is valuable for athletes and people who have difficulty in getting enough protein through food.

    FAQ

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    . Is keratin a protein?.

    Yes, keratin is a type of protein that is found in your body. It is the main component of your skin, hair and nails. The body naturally produces keratin to protect these parts from various types of damage. And keratin treatments for hair are popular because they precisely help strengthen hair and improve its appearance.

    . What proteins are best for weight loss?.

    When losing weight, make sure you consume proteins that are low in fat and high in biological value. Chicken, turkey and lean beef are particularly important here. It's also worth including fish in your diet especially oily fish such as salmon and mackerel - they are a source of protein and healthy fats.

    Don't forget, however, plants: legumes (lentils, chickpeas), chia seeds or quinoa are excellent alternatives for those on a vegetarian or plant-based diet. Eggs are also a good source of protein. What's more, they have the added benefit of containing high doses of choline, a compound essential for the body to function properly.

    . Is protein a protein?.

    Yes, the words 'protein' and 'protein' are used interchangeably, as both refer to the same class of organic compounds. Proteins are essential for the proper functioning of the body - they participate in metabolic and building processes, regulate the course of many chemical reactions, and play an important role in the immune system.

    . How much protein does an egg have?.

    One medium-sized egg, weighing about 60 grams, will provide you with roughly 7 grams of protein. Protein is found in both the yolk and the white of the egg, but it is the white that contains more of it - about 3.6 grams per egg, while the yolk provides about 3.4 grams of protein. It is also worth remembering that egg white has a very high biological value, which means that it is perfectly digestible by the body.

    . What proteins to choose for women, men and children?.

    Protein selection should be tailored to age, gender and lifestyle. For women, proteins rich in iron  (red meat, broccoli) and calcium (dairy, nuts) are particularly important.

    Men who are actively training should choose high biological value proteins (chicken, fish, eggs), which help build muscle mass.

    On the other hand, for children, growing and developing, proteins from whole grains, dairy and meat are needed to ensure the provision of essential amino acids.

    . How much protein does a banana have?.

    Banana is a tasty and healthy fruit that is often considered an essential part of a balanced diet. However, it is not a major source of protein - one medium-sized banana (about 120-150 g) contains only about 1.5 grams of protein.

    Although protein is not dominant in this fruit, the banana provides many other important nutrients such as fibre, potassiummagnesium and vitamins, including vitamin C and vitamin B6, making it an extremely valuable fruit in the daily diet.

    . What does protein in urine mean?.

    The presence of protein in the urine can signal several health problems. Normally, healthy kidneys do not pass large amounts of protein into the urine, so this condition may indicate a problem with this organ. It is not uncommon for this to include kidney disease, such as nephropathy or nephritis.

    Other reasons for protein in the urine include high blood pressure, diabetes, inflammation or infection of the urinary tract. Protein in the urine can also occur after intense exercise. This condition always requires an accurate diagnosis and assessment by a doctor.

    . Are proteins valuable in cosmetics?.

    Yes, proteins are valuable ingredients in cosmetics. In many skin products, such as creams, masks and lotions, they are used as moisturising and smoothing ingredients. In hair products, on the other hand, proteins such as keratin or silk are used to repair damage, strengthen the hair structure, and add shine and softness.

    Soy, milk or rice proteins also have strong moisturising and nourishing properties. All this makes them an essential ingredient in skincare products, helping to improve the condition of the skin and hair.

    They are also a great way to improve the condition of the skin and hair.

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    .

    Sources

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    . See all.

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