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Caffeine - a natural stimulant: properties, dosage and sources

Caffeine - the legal psychoactive agent in your favourite little black.

Nina Wawryszuk - AuthorAuthorNina Wawryszuk
Nina Wawryszuk - Author
AuthorNina Wawryszuk
Natu.Care Editor

Nina Wawryszuk specialises in sports supplementation, strength training and psychosomatics. On a daily basis, in addition to writing articles for Natu.Care, as a personal trainer she helps athletes improve their performance through training, diet and supplementation.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed byReviewed byIlona Bush
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Ilona Bush - Reviewed by
Reviewed byIlona Bush
Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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Caffeine - a natural stimulant: properties, dosage and sources
29 April, 2024
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Caffeine is a natural psychoactive agent - I know, it sounds corny, but it helps many people start the day at work, cram knowledge the night before a session or make lives on a workout.

Caffeine consumption has many health benefits, but it doesn't take much to make a crash out of arousal. I have co-written about what caffeine gives and how to find the balance in its use with Ilona Krzak, MSc in pharmacy.

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From this article you will learn:

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  • What caffeine is and how it works.
  • .
  • What are the benefits of using caffeine.
  • .
  • What is the safe dosage of caffeine.
  • .
  • Whether caffeine is addictive.
  • .
  • What are the common sources of caffeine.
  • .

Caffeine - what is it?

.

Caffeine (English caffeine) is an organic chemical compound from the alkaloid group that is found in coffee and cocoa beans, kola nuts and tea leaves, among others. It is classified as a stimulant because it has a stimulating effect on the central nervous system (CNS)and.

Stimulants increase activity in certain areas of the brain, leading to an increase in concentration, attention and energy and a reduction in fatigue. Caffeine is therefore a natural psychoactive agent, but it can also be obtained by chemical synthesisand.

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Caffeine blocks selected adenosine receptors, causing the release of neurotransmitters e.g. dopamine, serotonin and glutamate. Their elevated concentrations result in, among other things, stimulation of the nervous system, vasodilation of blood vessels and acceleration of the heart rate.

It is used as an additive in some products, including energy drinks, pre-workout drinks, medications or dietary supplements.

History lesson

Already in the Stone Age, people noticed that chewing the seeds or leaves of certain plants had a stimulating effect, improving performance and attentiveness. Much later, humans realised that they could increase their effectiveness by immersing the ingredients in hot waterand. We have come a long way - from chewing leaves, to the ritual of yerba, to the pumpkin spice latte.

Is caffeine a ... drug?

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Yes, caffeine is a drug because it belongs to the group of stimulants, that is, psychoactive substances that act mainly as a stimulant by affecting the activity of the sympathetic or central nervous systemand.

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In society, there is an informal division between psychoactive substances acceptable (e.g. caffeine, nicotine or alcohol) and unacceptable (e.g. cocaine, heroin or amphetamines) - but all meet the criteria for belonging to this group.

Of course, caffeine differs in its effects and side-effects from heroin, but it is impossible to disavow their common classification. This, however, is a separate topic that is best discussed over... small black.

Caffeine - chemical formula

.

The chemical formula of caffeine is C₈H₁₀N₄O₂. It was discovered in 1819 by German chemist Friedrich Ferdinand Rungeand. Caffeine is found in many popular products and chemically it is the same substance, although called by a different name.

Caffeine is otherwiseand:

  • theine - from tea,
  • .
  • matein - from yerba mate,
  • .
  • guaranine - from guarana,
  • .

There are some differences in its effects on the body depending on the source. These are due to the amount and the presence of other substances with which it is consumedand.

Magister of Pharmacy adds:
Caffeines inactivate caffeine. You can taste them in very strong, concentrated tea - it's bitter, astringent. The longer the tea is brewed, the more tannins are released.

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If you want a refreshing, stimulating drink, then stick to the rule of thumb to brew for no longer than 3 minutes.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Caffeine versus caffeine anhydrous

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The primary difference between caffeine and anhydrous caffeine is that the latter is a pure, concentrated form of caffeine, whereas 'regular' caffeine is usually consumed in its natural form, such as in drinksand.

Caffeine anhydrous is obtained in laboratories through processes such as water filtration. The result is a white, crystalline powder with a highly concentrated caffeine content. Thanks to this processing, manufacturers of medicines or dietary supplements can specify its dosage more precisely in capsules or powder.

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Caffeine is used in the manufacture of medicines. You will find it in painkillers or cold preparations, for example. It acts as a supportive agent to make the medicine work more effectively.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Caffeine can also be found in preparations for the treatment of migraine, apnoea, hypotension, and the prevention and treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants - adds MSc pharmacist.

The following is an example.

Metabolism of caffeine

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Caffeine is absorbed in the body within 45 minutes, and its blood levels peak within 15-45 minutes of ingestionand. It is assimilated in the small intestine and then metabolised in the liver.

The duration of caffeine's effect depends on the source (e.g. caffeine in capsules or powder will be absorbed more quickly than from black tea) the dose, age, body weight and a person's sensitivity to the substance .

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When absorbed, caffeine rapidly enters all tissues of the body and also crosses the blood-brain, blood-placental and blood-nuclear barriers.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Dangerous dry scooping

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Dry scooping involves taking a portion of caffeine powder directly into the mouth, rather than dissolving it in water. This is dangerous because anhydrous caffeine is easy to overdose on, the powder can be difficult to swallow and can enter the lungs and nostrils through coughing. A teaspoon of caffeine powder can be equivalent to 28 cups of coffeeand.

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Caffeine - properties

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Caffeine has been shown to have many beneficial properties, such as increasing concentration, adding energy, improving reflexes and even increasing metabolic rate. Thanks to its ability to constrict blood vessels, it can also alleviate migraine painand.

What exactly does the scientific research suggest?

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Promotes cognitive function

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Caffeine benefits cognitive functionand:

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    .
  • improves alertness and concentration,
  • .
  • reduces sleepiness during mental fatigue,
  • .
  • supports accuracy, reasoning, memory, reaction time, attention,
  • .
  • can improve some aspects of cognitive function that have been impaired by sleep deprivation,
  • .

Caffeine acts mainly in the central nervous system, where it prevents adenosine from binding to its receptor, which affects the secretion of several neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, which are involved in, among other things, alertness, motivation, memory.

Caffeine has a positive effect on the release of several neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, which are involved in, among other things, alertness, motivation, memory.

Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee a day or more than three cups of tea a day can reduce the risk of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease by 28-60%and.

Improves wellbeing

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Research suggests that consumption of 200 to 250 mg of caffeine improves mood,This effect can last up to 3 hours .

A meta-analysis of 12 studies published in 2015 found that drinking coffee or tea regularly reduces the risk of depression by 13% . Another review of studies linked drinking 2-3 cups of coffee (200-300 mg of caffeine) per day with a 45% lower risk of suicideand.

Coffee is a treasure trove of antioxidants and bioactive compounds that also have a mood-boosting effect, and caffeine has a part to play in this - in a reasonable dose, of course. Bear in mind that higher doses (>600 mg per day) can increase tension or anxiety and exacerbate unpleasant symptoms such as an accelerated heartbeatand.

Influences metabolism and fat burning

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Caffeine is a popular ingredient in many weight-loss supplements or so-called burners. This is because its effects look promising in scientific studies.

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Caffeine can increase metabolism by up to 11% and fat burning by up to 13%and. It also increases resting metabolism - in practice, this means that consuming around 300 mg of caffeine a day can allow you to burn an extra 79 calories - as much as a ball of Raffaello.

Interestingly, this effect is less pronounced in obese or elderly peopleand. One study found that caffeine increased fat burning by as much as 29% in slim people and 10% in obese people .

Everything counts

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Caffeine increases the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and norepinephrine, which in turn makes you feel more energised and awake. You're more willing to take the stairs instead of using the lift, and you stomp along to your favourite music. It all burns kilocalories.

Caffeine increases basal metabolism, meaning you burn more kcal even when you're not moving, but these are such low amounts that don't expect spectacular results - it won't do itself.

See also:

.

Reduces appetite

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Hunger and appetite are controlled by complex systems in your body, which can be heavily influenced by what you eat and drink. Research suggests that caffeine intake 0.5-4 hours before a meal can affect gastric emptying rates, appetite hormones and feelings of hungerand.

Maybe you're thinking that this is then a great idea for weight loss support. And yes, and no. If you want to lose weight, drinking coffee can indeed help you and suppress hunger. Consuming it between meals can influence you to want to eat less.

However, having coffee for breakfast instead of a meal or consuming it when you already feel a strong hunger is a bad idea. Sooner or later physiology will win out and you will simply eat, even more than you plannedand and... you may develop heartburn.

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Coffee increases gastric juice secretion and can cause heartburn in some people.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Provides energy and improves sports performance

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It's said that you make two kinds of lifetimes in life: those on caffeine and those without. That says a lot about the powerful effect it has on improving performance, strength and overall athletic performance.

Caffeine is a popular ingredient in so-called pre-workout supplements (PWRs), i.e. formulations containing combinations of active ingredients that exert an increase in energy, strength and performance during training.

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The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) removed caffeine from its list of banned substances in January 2004 and moved it to a so-called monitoring programme.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Caffeine may increase the use of fat as fuel, which may affect longer glucose storage in muscle, potentially delaying the time at which muscle reaches exhaustionand.

A review of studies involving a total of 202 people found that caffeine can increase fatigue tolerance and reduce perceived exertion during exercise by up to 5.6% .

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Eat caffeine

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A 2023 study involving young, trained individuals found that chewing gum with 200 mg of caffeine 15 minutes before a workout had a beneficial effect on performing the Romanian deadlift compared to a placebo. Caffeine increased total work (+7%), average power (+12%) and strength (+22%)and.

See also:

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Promotes the cardiovascular system

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Many scientific studies highlight that moderate caffeine consumption benefits cardiovascular healthand.

Drinking 1-4 cups of coffee per day (i.e. 100-400 mg of caffeine) can reduce the risk of heart disease in men and women by 16-18% . Other studies show that drinking 2-4 cups of coffee or green tea per day is associated with a 14-20% lower risk of strokeand.

A comprehensive review of 26 scientific studies found that people who regularly consume caffeine have up to a 30% lower risk of diabetesand. The authors observed that the risk drops by 12-14% for every 200 mg of caffeine consumed.

Remember that green tea and coffee also contain many other bioactive ingredients that also contribute to this health benefit - it is not caffeine alone. That's why it's a good idea to choose natural sources of it instead of tablets or capsules with pure caffeine.

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Coffee has been linked to a likely reduced risk of breast, colorectal, colon, endometrial and prostate cancer.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Caffeine and pain

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The scientific research on this topic is inconclusive. On the one hand, caffeine can cause migraines and headaches, as well as being a cure for themand. Researchers suggest that caffeine should be controlled on a daily basis, and migraine sufferers should limit their intake to 200 mg/day .

Is caffeine addictive?

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Yes, caffeine is addictive. The criteria caffeinism (caffeine addiction) are described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-V)and.

A person must meet the three necessary and sufficient diagnostic criteria for caffeine use disorder :

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    .
  • persistent craving or unsuccessful efforts to reduce or control caffeine use,
  • .
  • continued caffeine intake despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that was likely caused or exacerbated by caffeine,
  • .
  • withdrawal, manifested by a characteristic caffeine withdrawal syndrome; caffeine/closely related substance is taken to alleviate or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Six additional diagnostic criteria included in other caffeine use disorders, such as hungerintolerance and taking it in larger amounts or for longer than intended, have also been included as markers of greater severity of the problem of caffeinismand.

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A sudden cessation of caffeine consumption causes mild and transient withdrawal symptoms that begin after 12-24 hours of abstinence and peak 20-48 hours later.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Symptoms include headache, fatigue, drowsiness, irritability, lowered mood and anxiety. Reactions to caffeine withdrawal vary widely between individuals and are usually not harmful. They are short-lived and self-limiting," adds magister of pharmacy.

Unlike other addictive substances, caffeine does not cause changes in the internal organs. In contrast, the recovery time from this substance lasts about two weeks. If the addiction is severe and the withdrawal attempt causes anxiety and other distressing symptoms, it is worth seeing a psychiatrist.

Tolerance to caffeine

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Regular, long-term consumption of caffeine can lead to changes in brain chemistry. For example, brain cells may start to produce more adenosine receptors to compensate for those blocked by caffeineand.

In turn, more receptors require the consumption of more caffeine to achieve the same effect (e.g. stimulation). Therefore, regular coffee drinkers may build up a tolerance to it over timeand.

Caffeine versus genes

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Proteins (enzymes) in the body metabolise caffeine and there are several gene variants that produce these enzymes. One enzyme, cytochrome P450 1A2, which is responsible for about 95% of caffeine metabolism, is encoded by the CYP1A2 gene. And different variants of this gene cause people to metabolise caffeine faster or slowerand.

Is caffeine harmful?

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Yes, caffeine consumed in excessive amounts (>400 mg/day) is harmful to health. its regular abuse (especially anhydrous caffeine used in dietary supplements) can lead toand:

in some people.
  • sleep disturbances,
  • .
  • increased anxiety,
  • .
  • irregular heartbeat,
  • .
  • migraine and headache,
  • pain.
  • muscle tremors,
  • high blood pressure,
  • high blood pressure.
  • high blood pressure,
  • .

Does caffeine leach magnesium?

It depends what we mean by leaching out. It sounds scary, doesn't it? It's as if all the magnesium in your body is about to drain out of you.

Caffeine has a diuretic effect and can flush out magnesium and other valuable components from the bodyand. Increased diuresis can last for about 3 hours after taking. The more caffeine at once, the greater the loss of minerals.

However, here it is worth noting that drinking coffee  (a great source of natural caffeine) does not leach magnesium, in fact the opposite - a little black will provide you with itand.

One cup (150 ml) of black coffee can result in a magnesium loss of about  1-2 mg, but will provide you with as much as 10-16 mgand (depending on the type of coffee and water, the brewing method).

Therefore, do not be afraid of coffee, but rather pure caffeine in dietary supplements (e.g. pre-workout or fat burners).

Caffeine content of products

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See below for information on how much caffeine popular drinksand contain approximately.

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160 mg

44.5 mg

Product

.

Quantity of caffeine

.
.

Espresso (30 ml)

60 mg

Double espresso (60 ml)

.

120 mg

Brewed coffee (100 ml)

.

40 mg

Decaffeinated brewed coffee (100 ml)

.

0.84 mg

Cold brew (100 ml)

.

40-70 mg

Soluble coffee (100 ml)

30 mg

Decaffeinated coffee (100 ml)

.

1.6 mg

Black tea (200 ml)

Black tea (200 ml).

40 mg

Green tea (200 ml)

.

35 mg

Yerba mate (200 ml)

.

106 mg

Matcha (1.5 g powder)

.

65 mg

Natural cocoa (2 teaspoons)

.
7 mg

Hot chocolate (200 ml)

.

5 mg

Red Bull classic (250 ml)

80 mg

Monster Energy (500 ml)

Coca-cola (250 ml)

.

20 mg

Pepsi (250 ml)

.

25 mg

Bear Energy (250 ml)

.

150 mg

Mountain Dew (330 ml)

.

Bitter chocolate 85% (100 g)

.
80 mg

Dark chocolate 60% (100 g)

.

43 mg

Milk chocolate

20 mg

In the case of coffee, it is difficult to specify, how much caffeine is realistically in it. The content depends on several factors:

  • type of coffee bean,
  • .
  • the type of water used
  • .
  • type of coffee,
  • .
  • roasting stage,
  • .
  • portion size,
  • .

Therefore, for health reasons, it is advisable to drink no more than 2-3 cups of coffee per day.

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Coffee with milk

Milk does not affect the caffeine content, which is why popular drinks such as cappuccino and latte macchiato have the same amount of caffeine per 100ml as regular coffee.

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Caffeine dosage

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Scientific studies indicate that the safe dose of caffeine for healthy adult individuals is a maximum 400 mg per dayand. The dosage depends on your goal (e.g. improving concentration or boosting before a workout) and the measure you are using (e.g. classic coffee, caffeine tablets or powder).

In practice, a healthy caffeine intake looks like this:

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  • if you drink coffee, it is usually 4-5 cups or 3-4 mugs of coffee per day,
  • .
  • if you drink yerba mate, 30g of dried mate per day is usually sufficient,
  • .
  • if you take dietary supplements, absolutely follow the dosage given by the manufacturer.
  • .

Pregnant women should limit their caffeine intake to maximum 300 mg per day. Larger amounts can lead to miscarriageand.

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Both to improve concentration and to enhance performance during training, 100 mg of caffeine may be enough for you. Using higher portions is unnecessary, and in some people may cause them to need to add more after time.

Caffeine overdose

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Caffeine overdose occurs when we consume more than 500 mg per day and observe in ourselves symptoms of excess such as increased agitation, arrhythmia, facial flushing, muscle tremors, nervousness, dry mouth, stomach upset and insomniaand

Important

According to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), a dose 400 mg of caffeine per day (calculated for a 70 kg adult - approximately 5.7 mg/kg) is not expected to cause long-term negative health side effects . Pregnant women should limit caffeine intake to 200- 300 mg per day .

Caffeine lethal dose

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The single lethal dose of caffeine is 10-14 g (approximately 150-200 mg/kg body weight). At 10 g the first symptoms such as convulsions, vomiting and malaise appearand.

Caffeine begins to affect the body when its blood levels exceed 15 mg/l, so concentrations of 80 to 100 mg/l can be fatal to humans .

.

Suicide by overdose

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In a review of 2018 scientific journal articles, researchers identified 92 reported caffeine overdose deaths. The researchers believe that about a third of these deaths are likely to be suicidesand.

After what time does caffeine take effect?

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Caffeine begins to act in the body after about 10 minutes, and reaches its maximum concentration within 15-45 minutes of ingestion. The effect of caffeine and the resulting feeling of arousal depends on the source of the caffeine and individual factors such as age, weight or health status, but can last up to 5 hours after consumptionand.

After what time does caffeine disappear from the body?

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The plasma half-life of caffeine can range from 1.5 to as much as 9.5 hours in some people . This means that during this time its concentration in the blood is reduced by half. So, if you calculate correctly, it must take up to a dozen hours for this substance to disappear from the body.

Tip

To get rid of caffeine from your body faster, drink plenty of water.

Caffeine for children

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According to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), children should not consume more 2.5 mg of caffeine per kilogram of body weightand. That is, for example, the average first-grader can consume a maximum of 75 mg of caffeine per day.

Unfortunately, there are no official guidelines for Poland, so I will use those provided by the Ministry of Health in Canada . Experts suggest maximum caffeine intake for children and adolescents:

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Age

.

Maximum daily dose of caffeine

.
.

Under 4 years

It is not recommended to take caffeine in any form

.

4-6 years

45 mg

7-9 years

62.5 mg

10-12 years

85 mg

From 13 years

Up to 2.5 mg/kg body weight

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in general does not recommend caffeine consumption by children and adolescents, due to its potentially harmful effectsand.

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The US case

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In 2017, a South Carolina teenager died after drinking a latte from McDonald's, a large Mountain Dew soda and a high-caffeine energy drink . According to the coroner, the mixture of drinks led to a "caffeine-induced cardiac event, causing a probable arrhythmia".

Energy Act 2024

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From 1 January 2024, legislation came into force in Poland banning the sale of energy drinks to people under the age of 18.

The Energy Drinks Act 2024

is a new law.
.

Important

The legislator has defined that an energy drink is a beverage with added caffeine or taurine, which contains caffeine in a proportion exceeding 150 mg/l or taurine, excluding naturally occurring substances.

In the explanatory memorandum of the draft, its authors stressed that it was a response to an alarming report by the National Institute of Public Health - National Research Institute.

It shows that the consumption energol among children is:

  • 2.1% in children aged 3-9 years,
  • .
  • 35.7% in children aged 10-17 years (including 35.7% of boys and 27.4% of girls).

European data from 16 countries also raise blood pressure (even better than caffeine):

  • About 19% of surveyed children aged 6-10 years and 2% of children aged 3-5 years have consumed energy drinks in the past year.
  • The following are some of the results of the study.
  • Children aged 3-10 years who drink energy drinks consumed an average of 0.49 litres of them per week.
  • The average amount of energy drinks consumed by children aged 3-10 years was 0.49 litres per week.
  • 16% of children aged 3-10 years declared that they drink an energy drink 3-5 times a week, and around 6% of those surveyed said that they consume them almost every day.
  • The highest proportion of children consuming energy drinks was found in the UK (24%), Spain (26%) and the Czech Republic (40%).
  • Among the children surveyed, the least energy drinkers were in Hungary (6%), Belgium (8%), and Austria (9%). In Poland it was 12%.
  • .
  • As many as 60% of children and adolescents indicated that they drink them for taste and 31% see them as a source of energy.
.

And manufacturers are doing their bit...

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Drinks containing 14 mg/100 ml of caffeine are already sold in the Żabka chain of shops, which is exactly 1 mg/100 ml less than the drinks you have to show your ID card to buy.

Note that taurine or caffeine is not only found in Monster or coffee. This compound is also found in sweets - especially look out for candy bars.

Caffeine in pregnancy

.

A healthy pregnant woman can take up to 300 mg of caffeine per dayand. It is important to note that caffeine can easily cross the placenta, which can increase the risk of miscarriage or low birth weight babies, so mothers-to-be should limit their intake.

Some women find it difficult to give up coffee, so a decaffeinated option may be chosen. Such coffee contains minimal amounts of caffeine, but retains other valuable antioxidants that benefit health.

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A significant correlation has been observed between excessive caffeine consumption during pregnancy and reduced intelligence quotient in children. This supports current guidelines not to exceed 200-300 mg of caffeine per day.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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.

Side effects of caffeine use

.

Excess caffeine (consumption of more than 400 mg per day) can cause side effects such asand:

in some people.
    .
  • anxiety, mood disorders,
  • .
  • concentration problems
  • .
  • increased agitation,
  • .
  • arrhythmia,
  • .
  • facial flushing,
  • .
  • muscular tremor, dry mouth,
  • .
  • gastrointestinal distress,
  • .
  • insomnia,
  • .

Symptoms can be particularly dangerous for people with heart disease. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms, see your doctor.

There are a number of things you should do.

What not to combine caffeine with?

.

Caffeine should not be combined with certain medications, dietary supplements and plantsand.

.

Substance combination

.

Effects

.

Synephrine + caffeine

Some scientific studies suggest that the use of this combination (especially in high doses) may exacerbate agitation and disrupt heart function.

Synephrine + caffeine is a powerful stimulant for the heart.

Alcohol + caffeine

Caffeine speeds up the metabolism of alcohol, blocks the feeling of intoxication and can lead to excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages. The drinker does not feel that he has taken it, but the adverse effects of high amounts of alcohol come later.

Some drugs + caffeine

.

If you are on chronic medication, ask your doctor if you can use caffeine. Watch out for some combinations of caffeine with:

  • ephedrine - both substances can raise blood pressure and increase the chance of a heart attack,
  • .
  • theophylline - both substances exacerbate each other's effects and can potentiate the side effects associated with them,
  • .
  • antiepileptic drugs, anticoagulants, antipsychotics, contraceptive preparations - caffeine can reduce the absorption of these drugs.

Caffeine under eyes

.

Cosmetics with caffeine can improve the appearance of your complexion - it's a great antioxidant, and will be especially good under fatigued eyes. This compound has excellent drainage properties, meaning it stimulates skin microcirculation.

Cosmetologist Marta Kalbarczyk scores caffeine:

.
    .
  • Improves microcirculation, which contributes to the reduction of puffiness and dark circles under the eyes.
  • .
  • Prevents the dilatation of blood vessels, which is especially important for vascular or erythema-prone complexions.
  • Has an anti-inflammatory effect on the skin.
  • Has an anti-inflammatory effect, which has a positive impact on the alleviation of irritation.
  • .
.
Caffeine has the ability to penetrate the layers of the epidermis, but mainly has a surface action. This has the effect of reducing swelling, improving blood circulation and supporting the condition of the skin, especially in the area around the eyes.
.
Marta Kalbarczyk.

Marta Kalbarczykcosmetologist

.

Magister of Pharmacy Ilona Krzak adds: Commercially available topical caffeine preparations usually contain a concentration of 3% caffeine. For cosmetic purposes, caffeine is used as an active ingredient in anti-cellulite products; it prevents excessive fat accumulation in cells.

See also:

Summary

.
.
  • Caffeine is an organic chemical compound from the alkaloid group that is found in coffee and cocoa beans, kola nuts and tea leaves, among others.
  • Caffeine is an organic chemical compound from the alkaloid group that is found in coffee and cocoa beans, kola nuts and tea leaves.
  • It is classified as a stimulant because it has a stimulating effect on the central nervous system.
  • .
  • Caffeine anhydrous is the pure, concentrated form of caffeine present in medicines and dietary supplements.
  • Caffeine anhydrous is the pure, concentrated form of caffeine present in medicines and dietary supplements.
  • Caffeine is absorbed in the body within 45 minutes, with blood levels reaching their highest concentration within 15-45 minutes of ingestion.
  • The half-life depends on individual factors, but can be as long as 9.5 hours. This means that in some people, caffeine will not disappear from the body until 19 hours later.
  • It is not recommended to use more than 400 mg of caffeine per day.
  • .
  • Caffeine stimulates, improves reflexes, concentration, raises metabolism, increases strength and performance, and supports the cardiovascular system.
  • Symptoms of overdose occur after the ingestion of approximately 500 mg of caffeine.
  • .
  • The single lethal dose of caffeine is 10-14 g (approx. 150-200 mg/kg body weight).
  • The following is an example.
  • It is better to choose natural sources of caffeine such as coffee, yerba, tea, rather than dietary supplements with caffeine.
  • .
  • Caffeine is a popular ingredient in anti-ageing cosmetics, stimulating microcirculation and reducing swelling.
  • .

FAQ

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. What is the best caffeine?.

The best caffeine is that of natural origin: from coffee, tea, yerba or matcha. In addition to the stimulating caffeine, these products contain numerous bioactive ingredients and antioxidants that benefit health.

If, however, you don't like these drinks and prefer dietary supplements with caffeine in tablets, capsules or powder, choose products whose manufacturer performs laboratory testing to confirm the purity and quality of the ingredients. Unfortunately, many supplements (so-called  burners and pre-workouts) are contaminated or contain higher amounts of active ingredients.

. Does caffeine raise blood pressure?.

Caffeine raises blood pressure by 4-5 mmHg for systolic pressure and 8-10 mmHg for diastolic pressure. Caffeine raises blood pressure in the short term. Interestingly, however, in people who consume it regularly, this effect may not occur.

. Caffeine versus theine - what are the differences?.

Caffeine and theine are chemically the same substance, but the source differs - caffeine is the compound present in coffee, while theine is the caffeine found in tea. Interestingly, the caffeine in yerba mate is matein, while that from guarana is guaranine.

. Does matcha contain caffeine?.

Yes, matcha contains caffeine. There are 65 mg of caffeine in a serving of 1.5 g of powder (teaspoon), but the content may vary depending on the quality of the powder or the method of preparation.

. Is caffeine in tablets healthy?.

Caffeine in tablets can benefit mood, workout readiness or promote fat loss. However, it should be used in moderation (maximum 400 mg per day) and instead of tablets (capsules) choose natural sources that also provide other valuable bioactive ingredients.

. Does caffeine cross into breast milk?

Yes, caffeine crosses into breast milk at a rate of approximately 1% of a woman's caffeine intake. Therefore, it is not recommended to consume caffeine during lactation. Some breastfed babies may react badly (e.g. abdominal pain, irritability, crying). The breastfeeding mother can then replace, for example, regular coffee with decaffeinated or cereal coffee.

. Guarana versus caffeine, what are the differences?.

Guarana and caffeine differ in source, effect, caffeine content and additional active ingredients.

  • Origin: Caffeine is a chemical compound found in coffee beans, tea and cocoa, among others. Guarana is a plant native to the Amazon whose seeds are particularly rich in caffeine.
  • Guarana is a plant native to the Amazon whose seeds are particularly rich in caffeine.
  • Caffeine content: Guarana has one of the highest caffeine contents among plants - up to four times more than coffee beans.
  • Additional ingredients: Both contain caffeine, but guarana, in addition to caffeine, also has theobromine and theophylline - chemical compounds with similar effects to caffeine.
  • .
  • Effects on the body: Guarana caffeine is released more slowly into the body, making its effects long-lasting but less intense compared to standard caffeine.
. What does Cardiamide with caffeine work for?.

Cardiamid with caffeine is a liquid dietary supplement (100 ml bottle) containing caffeine, vitamin B6 and plant extracts from hawthorn fruit, ginseng root and guarana seeds. These ingredients help the body to reduce feelings of fatigue and tiredness. The price of the preparation ranges from PLN 20 to PLN 30.

.
. What plants give you energy?.

If you want to give yourself a natural energy boost, check out how plants (in the form of teas or supplements) will work for you: ashwagandha (Indian ginseng), rhodiola rosea, maca rootcordyceps (macca).

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Chen, C.-H., Wu, S.-H., Shiu, Y.-J., Yu, S.-Y., & Chiu, C.-H. (2023). Acute enhancement of Romanian deadlift performance after consumption of caffeinated chewing gum. Scientific Reports13(1), Article 1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-49453-y

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