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Vitania sluggard - properties, how it works, what it helps + opinions

Vitania sluggard (or ashwagandha) shows beneficial adaptogenic effects on the human body.

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Vitania sluggard - properties, how it works, what it helps + opinions
27 May, 2024
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It's certainly easier to ask for "sluggish vitania" at the pharmacy than ash...ashf...spaganda, and typing in a Google search has fortunately support. Regardless of which version you are looking for - it is the same plant with interesting properties.

For thousands of years, sluggish vitania has been used by practitioners in Eastern medicine for its support of stress resistance, improved sleep and even improved libido. If you're tempted to check out this exotic plant, find out what it can help you with and how to use it safely.

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From this article you will learn:

  • What properties vitania sluggard exhibits.
  • How much and how much it can help you.
  • How much and how to use it to feel the effects.
  • .
  • What the side effects of use may be.
  • Who should take it?
  • Who should not take sluggish vitania.
  • .

See also:

Sleuthwort - what is this plant?

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Vitania sluggard is the plant also known by the names: ashwagadha, Indian ginseng, comfrey and withania somnifera. It is commonly used in Ayurveda - traditional Indian medicine forand: stress relief, 

among other things.

improve sleep quality, strengthen the body, support health and well-being .

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It belongs to adaptogens, a group of plants with specific effects on the human body. Adaptogens induce physiological, morphological and biochemical changes in the body, exhibit antioxidant, tonic effects and help restore a state of homeostasis (balance)and.

Adaptogens, which also include rhodiola rosea, membranous astragalus or cordiaceps are non-toxic and safe for most peopleand.

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Active substances

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The compounds in sluggish vitania that are responsible for its health benefits areand:

  • alkaloids (e.g. vitanin, somniferin, anaferin),
  • .
  • vitanolides, or steroidal lactones (e.g. vitanoline a, vitanolides a-y),
  • .
  • vitanolid glycosides (e.g. sitoindosides, vitanosides),
  • .
  • flavonoids,
  • .
  • saponins,
  • .
  • coumarins,
  • .
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Ashwagandha contains the most structurally diverse set of valuable vitanolides of all plants, which translates into its unique effects on the human body.
Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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Vitalizing sluggard - properties

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Sleptomania has adaptogenic properties - it increases resistance to stress and its negative effects, has antioxidant and tonic effects, helps maintain a sense of well-being and supports healthy sleep. It restores balance in the body and is a helpful support in the treatment of certain ailmentsand.

This plant is one of the most studied adaptogens. Many scientific papers have examined its effects on physical and mental health. Results to date suggest that, in some individuals, it can be a helpful support for daily functioning as well as the treatment of many ailmentsand.

Sluggishness can help withand:

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  • Stress, anxiety and mental tension. Vitania osprey is known for its anti-anxiety effects, relieving stress and its negative effects on the body. It lowers cortisol (the so-called stress hormone) and supports mental health.
  • Sleep disorders. Systematic intake of this plant can improve the quality of sleep, by making it easier to fall asleep, calmer and increasing nighttime rest time.
  • .
  • Self-esteem. By reducing stress and improving quality of sleep it positively affects mood and motivation.
  • Mind fitness. Regular supplementation can improve memory and concentration, positively affecting mental performance.
  • Fatigue. Vitania sluggard may reduce feelings of fatigue and add energy. This can be linked to improved sleep quality - when you are sleepy, you have more desire to perform.
  • Regeneration of the body.  Supports post-workout muscle recovery.
  • Improves immune function.  Supports immune system function.
  • Antioxidation of the body. Eliminates harmful free radicals, reduces oxidative stress and reduces the negative consequences of their action.
  • Fertility. Increases sperm motility and improves semen quality.
  • Hormones. Increases testosterone levels in infertile men. Increases levels of thyroid hormones T3 and T4, so may support treatment of thyroid insufficiency.
  • Libido. Ashwagandha may help treat sexual dysfunction in women.
  • Cholesterol. Ashwagandha lowers 'bad' LDL cholesterol.
  • .
  • Pain relief. Reduces pain during chemotherapy and in osteoarthritis.
  • Conditioning. Supports the body's performance, especially in athletes doing endurance training, as it increases the aerobic ceiling.

Dosing of sluggish vitania

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Dosage of sluggish vitania depends on the manufacturer and form of the preparation. However, the most common use is:

  • 300 to 500 mg of extract per day for capsules or tablets,
  • .
  • up to 3 g of powdered root,
  • .
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons (5 to 7 g) of tea made from the root,
  • .

Various daily portions of vitania sluggard have been used in research studies, with a common regimen being 300 mg of extract twice dailyand. Adjust the form and dosage to your preference and watch how you feel.

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For improved sleep quality, stress reduction and tranquillity, 500 mg per night is recommended, while when it comes to muscle recovery and improved performance a 2 × 300 mg regimen will actually work.
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Julia Skrajda.

Julia SkrajdaDietitian

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If we are concerned about improving fertility in men and sperm quality, regular teas and infusions of the root work best - adds clinical nutritionist.

Is it possible to overdose on sluggish vitania?

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Yes, it is possible to lead to an overdose. This is usually the result of using too much sluggish vitania, not in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Scientists have used various doses (as high as 5000 mg) and forms (extracts, infusions) of this plant in their studies, but under controlled conditions.

Based on scientific work, it is considered that daily not to exceed 1,000 mg of extract and 3 g of powdered vitania periwinkle rootand. In using this adaptogen, regularity is key, rather than a high daily dose. You can take 800 mg every few days and you will achieve less benefit than someone using 300 mg but every day for 12 weeks.

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Important

Sluggish vitamin is becoming increasingly popular, so many manufacturers are adding it to multi-ingredient formulations, such as  for sleep, stress or vitality, and to so-called functional drinks. Sometimes it's a modest addition, but pay attention to what you're using so you don't unknowingly end up with an excess.

How long can sluggish vitania be used?

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Vitania sluggard can be safely used for up to 12 weeks, followed by a minimum 4-week break. There is no reliable data on chronic intake of this plant, so at this point it is considered "probably safe for humans" when used daily for 3 monthsand.

You may encounter information that taking a break is unnecessary, however, there are no scientific studies that have documented the effects of chronic use of sluggish vitania . Don't be a self-proclaimed 'guinea pig', and for a 4-week break try other adaptogens, such as rhodiola rosea, cordyceps, maca or Chinese citronella.

Contraindications to the use of vitania sluggard

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Vitania sluggard should not be usedand:

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  • pregnant and breastfeeding women,
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  • persons under 18 years of age,
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  • patients with autoimmune diseases, including thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis,
  • .
  • patients with bleeding disorders, gastric ulcers,
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  • persons planning surgery,
  • .

Do not take vitania sluggard preparations if you are concurrently usingand:

  • blood-thinning medicines,
  • .
  • medications used to treat the thyroid gland,
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  • medications that suppress the immune system,
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  • medications used to treat depression and anxiety,
  • .
  • medications for high blood pressure,
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  • sleep medicines,
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  • herbal preparations that cause drowsiness (e.g. St. John's wort, valerian, methystine pepper).
  • herbal preparations that cause drowsiness.

Consult your doctor if in doubt and you want to try sluggish vitania.

Is sluggish vitania good for children?

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There are no scientific studies that test what effect consuming ashwagandha has on children. We do not know if or how it affects their development, emotions and behaviour - for this reason, it is not recommended to give adaptogens to children.

Let's not kid ourselves - it is not an essential, irreplaceable plant for various ailments. If your child is restless, has trouble sleeping or is overtired, consult your doctor instead of giving them sluggish vitania.

If your child is restless, has trouble sleeping or is overtired, consult your doctor instead of giving them sluggish vitania.

Vitania sluggard - side effects

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The use of ashwagandha may cause side effectsand:

  • abdominal pain,
  • .
  • vomiting,
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  • nausea,
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  • diarrhoea,
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  • headache,
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  • rash,
  • .
  • bad mood,
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  • insomnia, insomnia, nightmares,
  • .
  • thyroid dysfunction,
  • .

To avoid side effects, check for contraindications to use and for interactions between your medication and other dietary supplements you are taking. If in doubt, advise your doctor.

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How to choose the best vitania sluggishness product?

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To choose the best vitania sluggard (ashwagandha) product pay attention to:

  • Standardisation. Determines whether there is an active ingredient in a particular herbal product and in what quantity. Vitania sluggard supplements should be standardised for vitanolides content. Ideally, there should be a minimum of 2.5% (a maximum of 10% - you won't buy more in Poland).
  • DER ( Drug Extract Ratio). Indicates how much plant material was used to produce one part of the extract obtained. E.g. DER 10:1 means that 10 g yielded 1 g of extract. The higher the DER, the stronger the extract.
  • .
  • Certificates. Trusted producers are happy to boast stamps attesting to good production practices, sustainable cultivation or laboratory testing.
  • Convenience. Consider what form will be most convenient - drops, capsules, tablets, infusion. Will you want to make a drink every day? Do you have a problem swallowing tablets?
  • .

Who can vitania sluggishness help?

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The use of sluggish vitania is recommended for everyone:

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    .
  • experiencing stress, tension, anxiety,
  • .
  • fatigued,
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  • with moderate sleep problems,
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  • wanting to improve memory and concentration,
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  • physically active,
  • .
  • women experiencing sexual dysfunction or menopause,
  • .
  • men with libido and fertility problems,
  • .
  • who want to feel a natural surge of energy and add vitality,
  • .

Famous moon milk

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In Indian medicine, to achieve harmony of body, soul and mind, a nutritious diet and good sleep are fundamental. A recommended drink that is beneficial for a good night's rest is moon milk. Will you try it?"

Ingredients for 1 serving:

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  • milk or vegetable drink - 200 g
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  • natural honey - 1 tbsp (approx. 20 g)
  • .
  • ashwagandha root powder - incomplete teaspoon (up to 3 g)
  • .
  • nutmeg - 1 pinch
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  • ground cinnamon - 1 pinch
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  • curcuma - 1 pinch
  • .

Making:

  1. Heat the milk or vegetable drink over a low heat.
  2. Add to the warm milk or vegetable drink.
  3. Add all the ingredients except the honey to the warm liquid.
  4. .
  5. Stir the ingredients well, preferably with a whisk.
  6. .
  7. Add the honey, but do not boil the liquid.
  8. .
  9. Decorate or add other ingredients as desired, e.g. dried flowers, fruit.
  10. .

See also:

Analysis of dietary supplements:

Summary

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  • Vitania sluggard is an adaptogenic plant used in Eastern medicine - Ayurveda. It is better known by the names ashwagandha and ashwagandha and withania somnifera.
  • Thanks to the bioactive compounds it contains (including vitanolides), it has an adaptogenic effect, i.e. it supports the body in coping with stress and restoring physical and mental balance.
  • Vitanolid improves mood, proper sleep, helps with stress, anxiety and tension, influences testosterone and thyroid hormone levels, supports male fertility, libido, helps with recovery and improves fitness.
  • The main contraindications to its use are age under 18, pregnancy, lactation, use of specific category drugs and certain diseases.
  • .
  • The usual use of this plant is 300-500 mg of extract or 3 g of vitania sluggard powder per day.
  • The use of this plant is safe for 3 months, then it is recommended to take a break.
  • .

FAQ

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. How does sluggish vitania work?.

Vitania sluggard acts adaptogenically in that it increases the body's resistance to stress and negative environmental factors through the bioactive substances it contains (mainly vitanolides). It acts antioxidant, tonic, supports healthy sleep and improves mood.

This adaptogen supports sexual health, improves male fertility, reduces the severity of some menopausal symptoms, and is a useful addition to the diet of performance athletes as well as those weight training.

. How to pronounce and spell ashwagandha correctly?.

On the internet you will find many incorrect (as well as funny) spellings of this plant, e.g.: ashpaganda, asheaganda, ashfaganda, ashwafanda. The correct spelling is "ashwagandha", and is pronounced hard "ashwaganda".

. How to use vitania sluggishness.

To feel the benefits of consuming this adaptogen, take a high-quality extract with a minimum of 2.5% vitanolides and use it daily for 8-12 weeks. You can feel the first effects of use even after 4 weeks.

. Does ashwagandha make you sleepy?.

No, ashwagandha (sluggish vitania) does not have a sleep-inducing effect because it does not have an ad hoc effect (the effects are visible after 4-8 weeks of daily use) and it does not contain substances that would affect sleepiness (therefore it can be used at any time of the day). Ashwagandha, after prolonged use, supports falling asleep and may improve sleep quality.

. Is ashwagandha safe?.

Yes, ashwagandha (sluggish vitania) is safe - it is one of the best studied adaptogens that is well tolerated by most people and rarely causes side effects. Typically, ashwagandha harms people who use excessive amounts of it.

. Vegetable ashwagandha - where to buy?.

You can buy sluggish vitania (ashwagandha) stationary, e.g. in good herbal shops, health food shops, pharmacies and online. When shopping, check the quality of the product - a good ashwagandha preparation should contain a standardised percentage of vitanolides.

. How many tablets of ashwagandha per day?.

How many tablets (capsules, powder) of ashwagandha to take per day depends on the specific manufacturer, so always take it as it is written on the packaging. Preparations with this adaptogen have different forms and daily portions.

. Does vitania sluggishness work?.

Yes, sluggish vitania has antioxidant and tonic effects, supports mental function, healthy sleep, reduces fatigue and reduces the negative effects of stress on mental and physical health. In addition, it has beneficial effects on male fertility, libido and reduces sexual dysfunction in women.

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Sources

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. See all.

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Ajgaonkar, A., Jain, M., & Debnath, K. (n.d.). Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Root Extract for Improvement of Sexual Health in Healthy Women: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study. Cureus14(10), e30787. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.30787

Ambiye, V. R., Langade, D., Dongre, S., Aptikar, P., Kulkarni, M., & Dongre, A. (2013). Clinical Evaluation of the Spermatogenic Activity of the Root Extract of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in Oligospermic Males: A Pilot Study. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: eCAM2013, 571420. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/571420

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