Home remedies for wrinkles: smoker's lines, under eyes, around mouth

Check out home remedies for wrinkles around the mouth, under the eyes and more.

Ludwig Jelonek - AuthorAuthorLudwig Jelonek
Ludwig Jelonek - Author
AuthorLudwig Jelonek
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Ludwik Jelonek is the author of more than 2,500 texts published on leading portals. His content has found its way into services such as Ostrovit and Kobieta Onet. At Natu.Care, Ludwik educates people in the most important area of life - health.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed byReviewed byIlona Bush
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Ilona Bush - Reviewed by
Reviewed byIlona Bush
Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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Home remedies for wrinkles: smoker's lines, under eyes, around mouth
29 April, 2024
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Do you know what Vaseline, massage and onions have in common? They can all support the fight against wrinkles in their own way. These fine lines are making our lives more and more miserable with each passing year, and constantly buying new cosmetics is not always the best option.

Sometimes the solution is at hand, or in the kitchen or bathroom. That's why today, together with Ilona Krzak, M.Sc. in pharmacy, we will introduce you to the best home remedies for wrinkles.

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From this article you will learn:

  • How wrinkles form and what types of wrinkles there are.
  • .
  • How to smooth forehead wrinkles with home remedies.
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  • What to do to prevent wrinkles on the face and more.
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  • Whether wrinkles can indicate serious health problems.
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See also:

How do wrinkles form?

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Wrinkles are a natural process of skin ageing. In most people they appear between the ages of 30 and 40, but in some people they can occur even before thirty. Over time, the skin loses its elasticity, resilience and firmness and becomes thinner. The result is fine lines that, over time, turn into wrinklesand.

What causes wrinkles ?

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  • Loss of collagenand elastin. Collagen is the protein that provides firmness to the skin. Elastin, on the other hand, is responsible for its elasticity. As we age, the production of these proteins declines, leading to wrinkles.
  • Facial expressions. Frequent execution of the same facial movements leads to the formation of so-called facial wrinkles. For example, the wrinkles around the eyes called dusty paws, are the result of regular squinting or laughing.
  • Sun exposure. Ultraviolet radiation, can damage the skin at a cellular level, leading to photo-ageing, resulting in wrinkles and age spots. Research suggests that sun exposure is responsible for up to 80% of the visible signs of ageingand.
  • Tobacco smoking and poor eating habits. Smoking speeds up the skin ageing process, as does an unhealthy diet. Lack of adequate amounts of vitamins, especially vitamin A, C and E, which act as antioxidants, can lead to an increase in skin ageing.
  • Stress. Long-term stress accelerates skin degradation, including the formation of wrinkles. The condition increases the production of free radicals, which are harmful to skin cells and more - oxidative stress can also lead to a number of diseases, such as type 2 diabetes.
  • Lack of sleep. Research suggests that a lack of adequate sleep contributes to skin deterioration. During deep sleep, your body rests, which allows your skin to remain firm.
  • .
  • Environmental pollution. Regular exposure to atmospheric pollutants, such as smog, can result in premature skin ageing. As well as stress, pollution leads to dangerous oxidative stress.
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UV radiation intensifies the collagen degradation process induced by metalloproteinases. Skin heavily exposed to UV radiation becomes flabby and ages faster. It is therefore very important to use sunscreens to protect the skin from burns and to reduce the risk of cancer.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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What are the types of wrinkles?

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There are four types of wrinkles: dynamic (facial) wrinkles, caused by facial muscle movements; static wrinkles, which are visible regardless of facial expression; gravitational wrinkles, resulting from the natural aging process and the action of gravity; and permanent elastic wrinkles, resulting from long-term sun exposureand.

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Static wrinkles are the result of the natural ageing process, prolonged sun exposure or inadequate skin care.

Type

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Characteristics

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Dynamic (facial) wrinkles

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They are mainly formed by the movements of your facial muscles, which you repeat when making different facial expressions. The most common example of dynamic wrinkles are the 'crow's feet' around the eyes. They are usually visible during facial movements and disappear when the face is at rest.

They are usually visible during facial movements and disappear when the face is at rest.

Static wrinkles

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They occur on the skin independently of muscular movements. They appear as a result of, among other things, the natural ageing process, prolonged sun exposure or inadequate skin care.

Gravity wrinkles

These are caused by the natural ageing process and the influence of gravity, which causes the skin to droop, creating deep lines and hollows. They most often become more prominent as we age.

Permanent elastic wrinkles

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They are the result of damage to the skin's structure caused by prolonged sun exposure. They form permanent lines and folds that do not disappear when the skin is stretched. They usually occur on areas that are frequently exposed to the sun, such as the neck, face and décolleté.

Home remedies for deep under-eye wrinkles

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Home remedies for wrinkles on the forehead, neck or décolletage can be truly invaluable. Some of them are better than the most expensive cosmetics and some... well - they won't work. But what's the harm in trying right? Find out which are the best.

Coconut oil

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The first home remedy for smoker's wrinkles and more is coconut oil. It is a natural source of antioxidants and vitamins. What's more, it has powerful moisturising properties that help keep skin young and healthyand.

A study conducted in 2021 on an anti-ageing cosmetic formulation tested the effect of coconut oil on wrinkles. The formulation was enriched with deer antler stem cell extract. The cosmetic reduced wrinkles (by 60.31% compared to the control group) and also reduced skin recovery time (by 67.1% compared to the control group)and.

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Coconut oil applied topically protects the skin from UV radiation and improves the barrier function of the skin. It is one of the better absorbing oils.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Direct use

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Apply coconut oil to your face before bed to provide deep hydration to the skin. Apply it gently to areas prone to wrinkles, such as the forehead, the area around the eyes and the mouth. In the morning, wash your face as usual.

Note, in some people coconut oil will clog pores.

Coconut oil-based masks

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  • Coconut oil and honey. Honey is a natural moisturiser that works synergistically with coconut oil. Mix a tablespoon of honey with a tablespoon of coconut oil and apply to the skin. Leave on for 15-20 minutes and then rinse off with warm water.
  • .
  • Coconut oil and aloe vera. Aloe vera helps with collagen production and also has anti-inflammatory and soothing properties. To prepare a mask with these ingredients, use a tablespoon of aloe vera juice and coconut oil. Apply to your face, leave on for 20 minutes and then rinse off.
  • .
  • Coconut oil and curcumin. The curcumin contained in turmeric has an anti-inflammatory effect and brightens the skin. Therefore, it can be an effective ingredient in a wrinkle mask. Apply the mixture to your face, leave on for 10-15 minutes and rinse off with warm water.
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Tip

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Remember that every skin is different, what may work for one person may not necessarily work for another. Therefore, always test on a small area of skin before applying more of a new specific product.

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As research shows, formulations containing curcumin can improve skin conditions in psoriasis, AD and other inflammatory skin conditions. Curcumin restores redox balance and neutralises free radicals, which slows down the ageing process. And when used with coconut oil, it further enhances its moisturising effects.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Apple vinegar

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Apple vinegar is rich in vitamins A, E, K, B1, B2 and B12, as well as minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, sodium, sulphur, selenium, copper, fluoride and silicon, which help to exfoliate the epidermis and also stimulate skin renewal. Therefore, apple cider vinegar can help reduce the appearance of wrinkles and improve the overall appearance of skinand.

Direct use

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To prepare homemade vinegar for wrinkles, mix it with water at a ratio of 1:1. Then use a cotton pad to apply. Leave on the skin for about 20 minutes and rinse off.

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Note

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If you have sensitive skin, add more water and less vinegar to your concoction.

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People with very sensitive skin should be careful as homemade vinegar for wrinkles can irritate the skin.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Apple vinegar mask

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Apple vinegar and honey mask combines the moisturising and anti-inflammatory properties of honey with the exfoliating benefits of apple cider vinegar. To use, mix one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar with two tablespoons of honey, apply to your face and leave on for 10-15 minutes before rinsing with warm water.

Ricin oil

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Castor oil has emollient properties and further promotes elastin and collagen production in the skin. Therefore, it can be an effective home remedy for wrinkles around the mouth and other areasand.

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Ricinoleic acid and its derivatives, present in oils, have moisturising properties.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Direct application

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Apply castor oil directly to the skin before going to bed. Focus on areas prone to wrinkles, such as the forehead or the area around the mouth. However, be especially careful that castor oil does not get into the eyes.

Put a small amount of castor oil on the skin before going to bed.

Place a small amount of oil on cotton wool or cotton pad and gently massage into the skin. Wait until the oil is absorbed into the skin before going to bed - otherwise the wrinkles will disappear from your pillow, not your face.

Remove the oil to your face.

Masks with castor oil

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  • Ricin oil and olive oil. Olive oil has extra antioxidant properties and provides vitamins that help moisturise and nourish the skin. Mix castor oil and olive oil in equal proportions, apply to the face and leave on for 15-20 minutes, then rinse off with warm water.
  • .
  • Castor oil and aloe vera juice. Aloe vera stimulates collagen production and has an anti-inflammatory effect. Combine a tablespoon of aloe vera juice with a tablespoon of castor oil, apply to your face, leave on for 20 minutes, then rinse.
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Hydroxytyrosol, one of the key polyphenolic components of olive oil, has recently been studied for its effect on UV-A-induced cell damage. It has been shown to combat reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by UV light.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Olive oil is one of the oils with penetrating properties, so it can have a nourishing effect, explains magister of pharmacy.

Vaseline

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Vaseline is a long-lasting and effective moisturiser. It is therefore recommended for those with dry and chapped skin. Vaseline forms a barrier on the skin that retains moisture and promotes the healing and regeneration of the skin.

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Vaseline forms an occlusive layer on the skin to prevent water loss. More often than not, however, this is not enough, so it is important to moisturise the skin from the inside by drinking plenty of water every day.
Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Direct application

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Direct use of Vaseline is best applied in the evening. Apply it to the skin, but don't rub it in too firmly - you can gently pat it in. In the morning, wash off the residue.

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Vaseline can clog pores, so monitor your skin when you use it. It's also best to wash it off in two stages - just like makeup.

Vaseline mask

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Honey, as you already know, is a natural moisturiser that works synergistically with Vaseline. Combine a tablespoon of honey with a tablespoon of Vaseline and apply to the skin. Leave on for 15-20 minutes and then rinse off with warm water.

Ovum white

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Egg protein is a rich source of... protein (surprise!), vitamins and minerals that can help improve skin elasticity and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. This is a particularly good suggestion for those with oily skin, as egg white unclogs pores and reduces sebumand.

Direct application

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If you want to directly apply the egg white to your face, you first need to separate the egg white from the yolk. Then use a facial brush (or clean fingers) to apply the egg white to your face. Leave them in this form for 15-20 minutes and then rinse with warm, but not hot, water.

Egg white masks

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  • Ovum white and honey. Honey is a natural remedy that promotes skin hydration. Mix a tablespoon of honey with one egg white and apply to the face. Leave in this form for about 15 minutes, then rinse off with warm water.
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  • Egg white and lemon. Lemon is a bleaching agent that can help reduce discolouration. Citric acid, on the other hand, acts as a natural exfoliator. Add lemon juice to egg white, apply to the face, leave on for 15 minutes and then rinse.
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Avoid mixing preparations containing egg white with cosmetics that have biotin in them. The avidin contained in the protein effectively binds and inactivates vitamin B7.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Avocado

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Avocados are rich in vitamins A, E, C, and also contain fatty acids, which are key to moisturizing and nourishing the skinand.

Direct use

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Cut a ripe avocado in half and mash with a fork to the consistency of a pulp. Then apply to the skin and leave on for 20-30 minutes. Rinse off with warm water.

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Avocado masks

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  • Avocado and honey. Honey has properties that help soften and moisturise the skin. Combine a tablespoon of honey with avocado, apply to the face, leave on for 20 minutes and then rinse.
  • Avocado.
  • Avocado and olive oil. Both ingredients are rich in healthy fatty acids that moisturise and nourish the skin. Combine a tablespoon of avocado with a tablespoon of olive oil, apply the mask to your face, leave on for 20 minutes and finally rinse.
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Honey is widely used in the cosmetic industry. It has applications in the treatment of dandruff, ringworm, seborrhoea, nappy rash and also psoriasis. In cosmetic preparations, it has an emollient, moisturising and soothing effect. It also helps to maintain the youthfulness of the skin, delays the formation of wrinkles, regulates pH and prevents pathogenic infections.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Argan oil

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Argan oil, also known as the liquid gold of Morocco has become famous for its nourishing properties - antioxidant and moisturising. It's another good home remedy for wrinkles on the forehead, under the eyes and elsewhereand.

Direct use

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You can apply argan oil directly to your skin before bed. Apply it to areas where you have problems with wrinkles, such as the forehead, the area around the eyes and the mouth. Lightly pat the oil into the skin until it is completely absorbed and you are done.

Argan oil masks

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  • Argan oil and oil with vitamin E. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that helps fight free radicals. Combine a few drops of vitamin E oil with a tablespoon of argan oil and gently massage into the skin. Leave on for 15-20 minutes and then rinse off with warm water.
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  • Argan oil and egg. Eggs are a rich source of protein, which helps to regenerate the skin. Prepare a mask by mixing one egg with a tablespoon of argan oil. Leave on your face for about 15 minutes before rinsing off with warm water.
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The egg yolk is a nutritional bomb. It is the one that provides the supply of ingredients necessary for the proper development of the new organism.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Note

Rather treat all the above home remedies for wrinkles as an experiment. In the long run, they will not replace cosmetics or a healthy diet.

What exercises and massages help with wrinkles?

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Various exercises and massages are either effective or completely ineffective ways to fight wrinkles. Everyone has a different opinion - for some it works, for others it doesn't. Either way, it's worth a try. All you need to do is spend a few minutes a day, and the results can be better than after applying creams for several hundred zloty.

Exercises for wrinkles

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  • Sun and moon. Start by smiling broadly (that would be sun) and then change your facial expression to be as sad as possible (that would be moon). Repeat the cycle 10 times and do 2-3 series.
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  • Soundless voices. Say the following letters aloud: a, o, u, e - in that order. Try to pretend they are one word. Do this with great accuracy. Do at least two series of five repetitions.
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  • Fish. Stretch your cheeks as if you were trying to make afish face. Repeat the exercise 10 times in two series.
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Massages for wrinkles

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Massages for wrinkles are one of the best ways to combat these defects. They are non-invasive, inexpensive, and (can be) enjoyable. Which ones are worth testing?

Gently pinch and pull the skin, which will support the body's production of collagen.

Gently "tap" your fingertips all over the face to stimulate blood circulation and reduce muscle tension.

Massage

Masking method

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How often to make

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Massage "pinching"

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Gently pinch and pull the skin, which will support the body's production of collagen.

Daily

Skinning

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Twist sections of skin to improve circulation and elasticity.

2-3 times a week

Cleansing of the skin

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Gently "tap" your fingertips all over the face to stimulate blood circulation and reduce muscle tension.

Daily (preferably during cream application)

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Lymphatic massage

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If you want to support the function of your lymphatic system, perform gentle, circular movements along the lymphatic lines of your face.

2-3 times a week

Temporal massage

Use the fingertips of both fingers to massage the temples in a circular motion. This will relax your skin (and yourself!) and reduce skin tension.

Take advantage of this.

Daily

Massage using the Gua Sha plate

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Gua Sha massage is an ancient Chinese medicine technique that focuses on improving the circulation of energy (chi) in the body. It uses a special tool - a Gua Sha plate, usually made of jade or amber.

The Gua Sha technique involves stimulating the skin and subcutaneous tissues with the flat edge of the Gua Sha plate. This massage stimulates blood circulation, relieves muscle tension and aids the body's detoxification process. Characteristic bruise-like marks may appear on the skin after the massage, but these disappear after a few days.

How to perform a Gua Sha plate massage step by step?

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  1. Prepare your skin. Start by cleansing your facial skin. Apply a serum or oil to clean skin to help the plate glide over the skin.
  2. Prepare your skin.
  3. Make movements along the neck. Beginning at the neck, glide the Gua Sha plate over the skin from bottom to top. Repeat the movements several times on each part of the neck.
  4. .
  5. Take care of the chin and jawline. Apply the plate to the centre of the chin and move it along the jawline towards the ear. Repeat several times.
  6. .
  7. Move to the cheeks and mouth area.Move the plate from the centre of the mouth along the cheeks to the top of the ear.
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  9. Take care of the area under the eyes. Gently move the disc from the inner corners of the eye towards the temples. Be careful, this area is very delicate.
  10. .
  11. Move to the forehead. Slide the disc from the eyebrows up the forehead, leading towards the hairline.
  12. Finish the massage. Finally, move the disc down along the contours of the face, towards the lymphatic duct to help drain lymph.
  13. Take care to moisturise. Finally, wash off the massage oil and apply moisturising cream or skin serum to your face. Also remember to clean the Gua Sha plate regularly after each use.
  14. .

For the face, Gua Sha massage can help lift and plump up wrinkles, especially with regular use. It can also accelerate cellular regeneration, improve skin elasticity and reduce puffiness and dark circles under the eyes.

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From non-domestic massages for wrinkles, it is worth looking into the Kobido massage, also known as a "Japanese facelift".
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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What is the best diet for wrinkles?

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Home remedies for wrinkles on the neck, face or around the eyes are not just about masks, exercise or massages. Equally important is a proper diet that will provide you with the nutrients you need.

Antioxidants

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Antioxidants are key to skin health and therefore wrinkle prevention. They help fight free radicals - molecules that damage cells and accelerate the ageing process. What are the best antioxidants for wrinkles?

  • Vitamin A (retinol). Vitamin A is important for skin health because it promotes cell renewal, helps normalise keratinisation (the process of creating new skin) and prevents sun damageand.
  • Vitamin C. Vitamin C doesn't just act as a great antioxidant. It is also essential for the production of collagen, the protein that gives the skin its elasticity and resilienceand.
  • Vitamin E. Vitamin E is known for its antioxidant properties, which reduce skin damage caused by exposure to the sun and other environmental factorsand.
  • .
  • Selen. It is a mineral that helps protect the skin from oxidative damage and is also important in maintaining skin elasticityand.
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  • Coenzyme Q10. A powerful antioxidant naturally produced by the body. It protects the skin from oxidative stress and also stimulates collagen and elastin production, so the skin retains its elasticity and ability to regenerateand.
  • .

Collagen

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Collagen is the most important structural protein in your skin, making up around 75-80% of its dry weight. It is a key ingredient that looks after the elasticity, density and overall health of your skin.

As you age, your body's collagen levels naturally decline, contributing to wrinkles and loss of skin firmness.

Luckily, you don't have to accept this. The right diet will take care of your skin from the inside out.

The right diet will take care of your skin from the inside out.

Collagen-rich productsareand:

  • broth on beef or pork bones,
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  • cicken feet,
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  • shank,
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  • guts (liver, heart, kidneys),
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  • fish or chicken with skin,
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  • vegetable, meat and fruit jellies (gelatine-based),
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  • salcessón,
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  • shark cartilage,
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Doesn't sound good? Don't worry. Firstly, collagen production is also supported by vegetables and fruit. But be warned - they won't provide you with collagen per se, but only support its production.

And secondly, consider collagen supplementation. There are collagen powders, liquids, tablets or capsules on the market. Pssst... the former two are not infrequently enriched with a good flavour (such as fruit).

Omega-3 fatty acids

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Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fats that play a key role in many aspects of health, including your skin. What do they affectand?

  • Improve skin hydration. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for keeping the skin hydrated. According to research, regular consumption of these fats can help reduce dry skin, improving the overall appearance and elasticity of the skin.
  • Protect against the harmful effects of the sun. Omega-3 fatty acids have antioxidant properties that can protect the skin from damage caused by UV rays. They can also prevent premature skin ageing caused by the sun.
  • Fight signs of ageing. The excellent moisturising and antioxidant properties of omega-3 acids prevent wrinkles and other signs of skin ageing.

Sources of omega-3 fatty acids

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Type

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Product specific

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Fatty fish

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  • salmon
  • sardines
  • mackerel
  • tuna

Nuts and seeds

  • chia seeds
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  • flaxseed
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  • hempseed
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Plegumes

  • fasola
  • lentils
  • chickpeas
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Water

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Yes, you read that right. Water is one of the most important dietary components that is often underestimated, especially in terms of skin health and appearance. It's something everyone talks about. But actually why? Water supports skin health in many ways. Here are some of them:

  • Hydration. Hydration is important for maintaining the health of the entire body, including the skin. Water hydrates the skin, keeping it firm and smooth, helping to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Hydration.
  • Purification. Water promotes the removal of toxins from the body, which contribute to skin ageing and wrinkles.
  • Cleansing.
  • Metabolic efficiency. Water is essential for proper metabolic function. Proper hydration promotes better absorption of nutrients from food, which in turn helps the skin maintain its health and youthful appearance.
  • Promoting collagen production. Water is necessary for the production of collagen - the main protein that provides firmness and elasticity to the skin. Without water, collagen production decreases, leading to a loss of skin density and the formation of wrinkles.
  • .

Therefore, whether you are fighting wrinkles or want to prevent them, you should permanently introduce an adequate amount of water into your diet. Research suggests a fluid intake of 30ml per kg of body weightand.

Protein

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Protein is important for your health and skin condition. It is an essential macronutrient that performs various functions in the body. It is well known to be an important muscle builder, but it also affects the health of our skin.

Protein provides the body with amino acids that serve as 'building blocks' for the construction and repair of various tissues, including the skin. What does this look like in practice?"

  • Stimulation of collagen and elastin production. Protein is essential for the production of collagen and elastin - two key substances responsible for keeping the skin firm and elastic.
  • Protein is a key component in the production of collagen and elastin.
  • Supporting skin health. Protein is essential for skin cell regeneration - it provides the body with essential amino acids.
  • .
  • General health. A Nutritious, balanced diet that includes adequate protein is a key part of maintaining overall health, which affects skin health.

Dietary protein sources

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Provide omega-3 fatty acids, which have a positive effect on skin hydration and protect against the effects of the sun.

They are rich in lutein, which improves the elasticity of the skin.

Provides isoflavones that can slow down the ageing of the complexion.

Source

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Protein content per 100 g

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Additional skin benefits

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Indic

29 g

It is rich in zinc, which supports the condition of the complexion.

Chicken

27 g

Source of niacin, which supports collagen production in the body.

Fish (e.g. salmon)

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22 g

Provide omega-3 fatty acids, which have a positive effect on skin hydration and protect against the effects of the sun.

Nuts

20 g

Contains vitamin E - a powerful antioxidant that protects against oxidative stress.

Contains vitamin E - a powerful antioxidant that protects against oxidative stress.

Chickpeas

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19 g

Has a lot of fibre, which has a beneficial effect on general health.

Egg

13 g

They are rich in lutein, which improves the elasticity of the skin.

Tofu

8 g

Provides isoflavones that can slow down the ageing of the complexion.

What ingredients to look for in cosmetics for wrinkles?

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Home remedies for wrinkles may or may not help - more often than not, they are simply a good support for already applicable cosmetics. When choosing wrinkle products, it's worth focusing on a few key ingredients that will restore your former glow. What should you look for in these products?

Retinol

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Retinol, the most active form of vitamin A, is one of the most important ingredients you should find in a wrinkle cosmetic. It is a popular agent used in many anti-aging products for its powerful anti-ageing propertiesand.

Retinol promotes skin cell renewal. The skin replaces old cells into new ones on its own, but as standard - this action slows down with age, leading to a build-up of damaged cells on the skin's surface. With retinol, new, healthy cells can replace the old ones faster, resulting in younger-looking skinand.

Additionally, retinol helps to stimulate the production of collagen - the main protein responsible for maintaining skin elasticity and firmness .

Finally, retinol also has the ability to reduce skin discolouration. This is because the ingredient increases the rate at which the skin exfoliates old cells, bringing out brighter, more evenly pigmented layers of skin .

Note

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Remember that retinol can be irritating to some skin types, especially at the beginning of use. Therefore, always start with a low concentration and gradually increase the frequency of application, observing your skin's reaction. Also, due to retinol's ability to increase skin's sensitivity to the sun, always use a UV sunscreen when using products containing this ingredient.

Hyaluronic acid

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The main secret of hyaluronic acid is its superior ability to retain water. It can bind up to 1,000 times more water than it weighs on its own, making it extremely effective at hydrating the skin. It acts like a sponge to hydrate the complexion and fill in fine lines and wrinklesand.

In addition to its ability to hydrate, hyaluronic acid also helps to keep skin soft and supple. By retaining moisture in the skin, it promotes firmness and elasticity in the complexion. Consistently moisturising the skin can help reduce the appearance of wrinklesand.

Hyaluronic acid is usually safe for all skin types. Therefore, even people with sensitive skin can benefit from its properties.

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Glycolic acid and salicylic acid

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Glycolic acid is highly effective at 'penetrating' the skin. It is well known for its ability to stimulate skin cell renewal, resulting in a younger-looking complexion. It can also reduce the appearance of wrinkles, improving skin density and texture. In addition, it is also helpful in combating skin discolouration, leading to a more uniform complexionand.

Salicylic acid, on the other hand, works on the surface of the skin - helping to exfoliate the complexion, cleanse pores and reduce their size. It is particularly valuable for those with oily or acne-prone skin, but will work well for anyone trying to prevent or combat wrinkles .

Salicylic acid removes dead, rough skin cells on the surface that can obscure healthy, radiant skin, leading to a smoother, younger-looking complexion.

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Note

Glycolic acid and salicylic acid can increase your skin's sensitivity to the sun. Therefore, it is important that you always apply a sunscreen product after using products containing these ingredients.

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People with diabetes should be wary of salicylic acid (and especially preparations with a high concentration of salicylic acid), as hard-to-heal wounds can occur. In such cases, preparations with urea are better suited.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Niacinamide

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The main role of niacinamide is to strengthen the skin barrier by accelerating the production of ceramides, which are naturally occurring lipids in the skin. This provides a better barrier that reduces water loss from the epidermis. Reduced water loss leads to deep hydration of the skin, which is key to maintaining skin health and a youthful appearanceand.

Niacinamide also has anti-ageing properties. Some of its actions include regulating sebum production, as well as dulling lines and wrinkles. Furthermore, by increasing collagen production, it helps to minimise the appearance of these imperfectionsand.

Additionally, niacinamide is effective in reducing hyperpigmentation and uneven skin tone. It works by inhibiting melanin (the pigment that is responsible for skin colour), leading to a significant reduction in spots and hyperpigmentation.

Ceramides

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Ceramides are important components in the skin that play a vital role in protecting the skin and maintaining adequate hydration. They make up almost 50% of the lipid components in the skin and are an integral component of the lipid barrier, effectively protecting the skin from water loss and the negative effects of external factorsand.

Ceramides, as natural lipids, form a protective layer that retains moisture in the skin and helps protect it from harmful environmental factors such as air pollution and UV rays. This keeps the skin hydrated, firmer and healthierand.

Ceramides are also extremely important in the context of skin ageing. However, their concentration in the skin decreases with age, which contributes to dryness, loss of elasticity and the appearance of lines and wrinkles. Using skincare products containing ceramides can replenish the valuable ingredients, providing protection and hydration to the skin.

Vitamin C and E

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Vitamin E and vitamin C are two powerful ingredients that are key to skin health. Both have the ability to neutralise free radicals, which are some of the main factors that accelerate the skin's ageing process.

  • Vitamin E. Also known as tocopherol, it is a fat-soluble vitamin with great antioxidant properties. It helps protect the skin from harmful environmental factors such as UV radiation, air pollutants and toxins. In addition, vitamin E is a key ingredient in collagen production and also retains moisture in the skin, helping to minimise lines and wrinklesand.
  • Vitamin C. Also called ascorbic acid, it is water-soluble - one of the most powerful antioxidants. It has become famous for its ability to reduce wrinkles by stimulating collagen production, reducing hyperpigmentation and protecting skin from UV damageand.
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What if home remedies and cosmetics for wrinkles don't help?

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Masks are, a good diet is, key active ingredients are. And the wrinkles? They're there too... If that's exactly how it is for you, don't worry - you're not the only one. As well as home remedies for facial wrinkles and more, there are other ways to deal with fine lines.

In case standard skincare doesn't help you, you can opt for various treatments. What is available on the market?

  • Dermatological treatments. You can benefit from a variety of dermatological treatments such as chemical peels, microdermabrasion and dermaplaning, which help fight wrinkles by removing the layer of dead skin cells, which helps to increase collagen production.
  • Treatments that can help you fight wrinkles.
  • Laser therapies. Laser treatments are an effective way to reduce wrinkles. They work by heating the layers of the skin, which stimulates the production of collagen and elastin - two proteins essential for maintaining skin firmness and elasticity.
  • Botox injections. Botox is one of the most popular treatments for wrinkles. It works by paralysing facial muscles, which prevents wrinkles from forming. However, keep in mind that the effect after a Botox injection is temporary, so the procedure needs to be repeated every few months. In addition, Botox may not be suitable for people with certain neurological conditions such as myasthenia gravis.
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  • Dermal fillers. For example, hyaluronic acid. Fillers can be injected into the skin to increase volume and fill in wrinkles. As with Botox, the effect is temporary, so the treatment needs to be repeated.
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  • Light therapies. These therapies use different wavelengths of light to stimulate the skin to regenerate and produce larger portions of collagen.
  • Application of lifting threads. Lifting threads are inserted under the skin to lift and noticeably smooth wrinkles. This method, can improve the appearance of the complexion.

10 ways to prevent wrinkles

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The above ways will allow you to fight wrinkles. But it is much better to do everything to prevent them from appearing at all. The main factor that causes them is age. Unfortunately - I don't have a remedy for that, but there are a few other actions that will allow you to prevent wrinkles.

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  • Protect your skin from the sun. Always use creams with sunscreen (SPF) - even on days that don't seem too sunny. Harmful UV rays can cause premature skin ageing and increase the risk of skin cancerand.
  • Avoid smoking. Smoking is not only detrimental to overall health, but also contributes to accelerated skin ageing, including wrinkles .
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  • Enjoy a healthy diet. Eating enough fruits, vegetables, protein and healthy fats helps keep your skin healthy .
  • Hydrate your complexion. Regular use of facial moisturisers helps keep skin supple and delays the appearance of wrinkles .
  • Perform physical activity. Regular exercise positively affects the appearance of the skin, improving blood circulation and providing nutrients .
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  • Drink water. Drinking plenty of water helps maintain skin elasticity and prevents premature ageing .
  • Care for sleep hygiene. While you sleep, your body regenerates, which helps keep your skin healthy and youthful-lookingand.
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  • Stay away from strong facial expressions. Frequent frowning of the eyebrows and other grimaces can lead to lines and wrinkles (this is why anger is bad for beauty) .
  • Regularly use beauty treatments. Peelings, masks or facial massages can improve skin condition and delay the ageing process .
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  • Systematically use antioxidants. Applying supplements containing antioxidants, such as vitamin C and E, can protect the skin from free radical damage that accelerates the aging process .
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Just one week after quitting smoking, I can see a dramatic improvement in my complexion.
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Ilona Krzak

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Moisturise, moisturise, moisturise again, and wash your complexion after any exposure to environmental pollutants - ideally after every time you come home.
Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Can wrinkles be an indication of serious health problems?"

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Wrinkles are a natural effect of skin ageing that is mainly caused by the passage of time, sun exposure, lifestyle and genes. Most of them appear as a result of these factors and are not associated with any serious health problems.

However, suddenly appearing wrinkles, skin weakness or other unusual changes in the appearance of the complexion may be indicative of certain health problems and should be consulted with a doctor.

For example, certain thyroid diseases can cause dry skin and wrinkles. Furthermore, kidney and liver conditions, as well as some autoimmune and genetic diseases, can also affect the appearance of the skin.

However, these are rare cases. Most often, wrinkles are simply caused by ageing skin.

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Taking recently popular drugs for the treatment of obesity (GLP-1 analogues), can lead to the so-called ozempic face effect. The complexion then looks older and more flabby.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Summary

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  • Wrinkles are a natural process of skin ageing, usually appearing between the ages of 30 and 40.
  • Wrinkles are a natural process of skin ageing, usually appearing between the ages of 30 and 40.
  • Factors contributing to the formation of wrinkles include sun exposure, loss of collagen and elastin, facial expressions, poor eating habits, smoking, stress, environmental pollutants and lack of sleep.
  • There are different types of wrinkles.
  • There are different types of wrinkles, such as dynamic (facial) wrinkles, static wrinkles, gravity wrinkles and permanent elastic wrinkles, which differ in their causes of formation and where they occur on the skin.
  • Home remedies for wrinkles include using coconut oil, castor oil, argan oil, apple cider vinegar, petroleum jelly, egg white, avocado and onions.
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  • Additionally, you can perform special exercises and facial massages for softening and reducing the appearance of wrinkles.
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  • Antioxidants, such as vitamin A, C, E, selenium and coenzyme Q10, are key to skin health and fighting wrinkles, helping to defeat free radicals and supporting collagen production.
  • Collagen is essential for skin elasticity and density, and its levels decline with age, contributing to wrinkles.
  • The most important ingredients in cosmetics for wrinkles are retinol, hyaluronic acid, niacinamide, ceramides, glycolic and salicylic acid, and vitamin E and C.
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  • If home remedies for wrinkles do not help, you can opt for treatments such as laser therapies or Botox injections.
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FAQ

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. What home remedies for wrinkles are effective after 50 years of age?.

The best home remedies for facial and décolletage wrinkles are moisturising the skin with coconut oil left overnight, which will deeply nourish the skin. Banana, honey and natural yoghurt masks are equally effective. Also remember to hydrate frequently and eat a balanced diet rich in vitamin C for the production of collagen.

. Is aloe vera a good home remedy for wrinkles?.

Yes, aloe vera is an effective home remedy for wrinkles. It contains numerous antioxidants and vitamins that help improve skin elasticity and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. You can apply it directly to the skin as a nighttime skin moisturiser.

. How to eradicate 'hamsters' on the face with a homemade remedy.

"Hamsters" on the face are actually puffiness or excess fatty tissue. You can minimise their appearance by regular massages and facial exercises that strengthen muscles and improve contours. A diet rich in protein, low in fat and with limited salt intake can also help.

. Does frequent squinting contribute to wrinkles?.

Yes, making frequent facial muscle movements can lead to the formation of so-called facial wrinkles. Squinting, especially in bright sunlight, leads to frequent contraction of the muscles around the eyes, resulting in "crow's feet".

Therefore, use sunglasses to protect your eyes from harmful UV rays and reduce the need to squint.

. How to prevent the formation of wrinkles.

Preventing wrinkles is a long-term process that involves factors such as a healthy lifestyle, a balanced diet, proper skin care and sun protection.

Prevent wrinkles.

Hydrate your skin, not only from the outside, but also from the inside by properly hydrating your body. Also introduce a healthy diet rich in antioxidant vitamins and minerals, and use UV sunscreen regularly to reduce skin aging.

. Is there a link between lifestyle and wrinkle formation?.

Lifestyle has a huge impact on your skin, including the formation of wrinkles. Smoking cigarettes, for example, accelerates the skin ageing process as it triggers a series of harmful reactions that lead to the breakdown of collagen and elastin. Likewise with poor diet (especially lack of vitamins), stress and sleep deprivation.

. Is the formation of wrinkles also influenced by genetics?.

Partly yes - genetics has some influence on how quickly your skin ages and whether it is prone to wrinkles. Some people have naturally thicker skin that is less prone to wrinkles, while others have thinner skin that may be more prone to damage.

. How does the skin change during the menopause?.

During the menopause, hormonal levels in women change, including the concentration of oestrogen, a hormone that, among other things, helps keep the skin firm and supple. The decrease in oestrogen amplifies the effects of ageing on the skin, which becomes thinner, less elastic and more prone to wrinkles.

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Ludwig Jelonek - Author

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Ludwik Jelonek is the author of more than 2,500 texts published on leading portals. His content has found its way into services such as Ostrovit and Kobieta Onet. At Natu.Care, Ludwik educates people in the most important area of life - health.

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Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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