Lysine: which is the best? (properties, action, what's in it)

Lysine is a small amino acid that is important for your body. More so than you might think.

Matthew Podlecki - AuthorAuthorMatthew Podlecki
Matthew Podlecki - Author
AuthorMatthew Podlecki
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At Natu.Care, she educates about healthy lifestyles and debunks dangerous myths, contrasting them with the results of the latest scientific research. Additionally, she is interested in new technologies and their impact on health and everyday life.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed by
Reviewed byIlona Bush
Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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Lysine: which is the best? (properties, action, what's in it)
29 April, 2024
17 min
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Our body is a perfectly designed machine in which every element matters. Even the smallest ones. That's where lysine comes in - an amino acid without which a lot in your body starts to fail.

With educator and pharmacist, Ilona Krzak, we will take a closer look at what exactly lysine is and why it is so important for you.

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From this article you will learn:

  • What lysine and collagen have in common.
  • What you need to know.
  • What are the symptoms and effects of lysine deficiency.
  • .
  • Which products contain the most lysine.
  • What is the most lysine?
  • Whether lysine is worth supplementing.
  • .
  • Why it is worth combining lysine with vitamin C.
  • .
  • Will lysine help with herpes.
  • Why is lysine worth supplementing?

See also:

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What is lysine?

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Lysine (L-lysine, lysine, Lys, abbreviated K) is one of the essential essential amino acids. It means that your body is unable to produce it on its ownand and you must supply it along with your diet.

Essentially, because it has many key functions - from regenerating damaged tissues, producing proteins (including collagen) and supporting calcium metabolism, to protecting against atherosclerosis and strengthening the immune systemand.

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What is the role of lysine in the body and what does it help with?

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Amino acids are crucial to our lives. Ba, we are made up of amino acids. They are what tissues are made of; they are what participate in many processes and regulate the functions of individual cells.

And what exactly does a leaf do?

And what exactly does lysine do? Here are some of its extraordinary powers.

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Aids in collagen synthesis

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Lysine is a key amino acid in collagen synthesis. This is because it participates in the hydroxylation process, which increases the stability and strength of collagen fibresand. Adequate levels of lysine are necessary to maintain the health and elasticity of skin, tendons and all collagen-rich tissues.

See also:

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Promotes wound healing

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Lysine also improves the ability to heal woundsand. At the wound site, lysine acts as binding agents, stimulating cells to grow. They will appear faster, there will be more of them - so regeneration will happen faster and more effectivelyand.

Wound healing is a complex process involving many factors, vitamins and minerals - the role of lysine here is invaluableand.

Strengthens joints and bones

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Lysine is also an important element in calcium metabolism - it increases calcium absorption in the gut and helps the kidneys retain it in the body.

A study of 30 women (including 15 with osteoporosis) showed that calcium supplementation (3 g) and lysine (400 mg) significantly reduced urinary calcium lossand.

Lysine also protects your bones and helps to control the transport of calcium in your body, preventing excessive accumulation in, among other things, blood vessels .

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Alleviates herpes

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herpes is an unpleasant infection that manifests as small, fluid-filled blisters at the corners of the mouth. They cause discomfort, tingling, pain and burning. Herpes is caused by the HSV-1 virus , but lysine supplementation inhibits the secretion of arginine, the amino acid responsible for the spread of the virus .

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Supplementation of at least 3000 mg (3 g) per day is shown to be effective. Doses of less than 1000 mg (1 g) have no effect in either the treatment or prevention of herpes.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Inhibits stress and anxiety

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Lysine may also play an important role in reducing anxiety, feelings of restlessness and lowering the stress hormone, cortisoland. This is because it blocks the action of receptors involved in the stress response.

Effects are dose-dependent - in one study, lysine and arginine supplementation produced effects after one week  and in another after three months .

See also:

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Other uses of lysine

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Lysine - as a building block of proteins - is involved in the production of hormones, enzymes and antibodies. It also exhibits properties that may benefit in the following areas:

  • Hypertension: lysine supplements significantly lower blood pressureand;
  • .
  • Diabetes: preliminary studies suggest that lysine may help regulate blood glucose levels, but this has not been observed in older people ;
  • Immune system: increases immunity and relieves symptoms of infection;
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  • Atherosclerosis: reduces its risk by strengthening the cardiovascular system;
  • .
  • Cancer: in combination with antioxidants, it can prevent the formation and spread of cancer cells;
  • .
  • Eyes: lysine for the eyes has a multifaceted effect - it helps fight 'dry eye syndrome' , and one study suggests that lysine supplementation may prevent the development of cataracts .

Lysine is also important for normal muscle growth and renewal and is involved in the formation of carnitine, which is found in most cells in your body. Lysine also helps cells transport fat to provide you with energyand.

See also:

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Lysine deficiency - symptoms and effects

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Although lysine deficiency is quite rare, it can occur with long-term restrictive or protein-poor diets. Vegans are particularly prone to deficiency.

The most common symptoms of lysine deficiency areand:

  • decreased immunity,
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  • anemia,
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  • feeling of fatigue,
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  • dizziness,
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  • problems with memory and concentration,
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  • weakness and hair loss,
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  • decrease in energy,
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  • bloody eyes,
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  • stunted growth,
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  • irritability,
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  • problems with fertility and the reproductive system,
  • disordered growth,
  • disability,
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  • skin problems,
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Lysine deficiencies - best food sources

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Make up lysine deficiencies with your daily diet.

Best sources of lysine.

The best sources of lysine are primarily foods with high protein content:

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  • meat - red and poultry,
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  • yellow cheeses and cottage cheese,
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  • fish - especially cod, sardines, halibut and tuna,
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  • chocolate,
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  • nuts - almonds,
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  • soya and soya products - tofu,
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  • spirulina,
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  • eggs,
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  • red beans,
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  • whole grain products,
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  • wheat groats,
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  • quinoa,
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  • amaranth,
  • .

(Yes, there is chocolate on the list, but don't ignore the other 12 products!)

Already this short list shows that you can compose a variety of tasty lysine-rich meals every day and more - and for breakfast, lunch and a light dinner.

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Do not sip lysine supplements (or other proteins) with a strong infusion of tea - it contains tannins, which reduce the bioavailability of proteins.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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If you have a known deficiency (or are concerned that you may have one), you can start lysine supplementation after consulting your doctor. Here are some products you may benefit from:

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efime L-lysine

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  • Lysine content: 500 mg
  • Additional active ingredients: vitamin B6
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  • Form: capsules
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  • Dose: 1 capsule per day
  • Sufficient for: 60 days

Product description:

A dietary supplement for daily use as a dietary supplement of l-lysine. The composition has been enriched with vitamin B6.

Description.

Pluses and minuses:

  • Optimal dose of l-lysine
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  • Presence of vitamin B6
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  • Vegan capsules with HPMC
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  • None
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Additional information

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Take with a meal

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NOW L-Lysine 1000 mg

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  • Lysine content: 1000 mg
  • Additional active ingredients: -
  • Form: tablets
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  • Dosage: 1 tablet per day
  • Sufficient for: 100 days

Product description:

A dietary supplement with a pure formulation and a high dose of lysine. Particularly recommended during periods of increased training.

Plusy

Pluses and minuses:

  • High dose of l-lysine
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  • Suitable for vegetarians and vegans
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  • Pure composition
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  • None

Additional information (user feedback)

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Made in a facility that uses DPP (good manufacturing practice). Contains no wheat, gluten, soya, milk, eggs, shellfish, tree nuts.

Free.

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Solgar L-Lysine 500 mg

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  • Lysine content: 500 mg
  • Additional active ingredients: -
  • Form: capsules
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  • Dose: 1-2 capsules daily
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  • Sufficient for: 25-50 days

Product description

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A dietary supplement with free lysine to help replenish deficiencies.

Pluses and minuses

  • Optimal dose of l-lysine
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  • Short formulation
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  • Suitable for vegans
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  • None

Additional information

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Consume between meals with water or juice.

Consume between meals with water or juice.

Check out other Solgar brand supplements.

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Lysine supplementation - what do you need to know?

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Lysine supplementation is safe, however, there are some important things to know.

Lysine or L-lysine?

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The right lysine supplement is a product that will contain free lysine (i.e. preceded by the letter L), or L-lysine. Choose this for its better bioavailability and absorption. L-lysine is easily digestible and goes directly into the bloodstream without loss - you don't need to digest it.

Dosage

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The safe adult dose of lysine for daily intake is approximately 12 mg for every kilogram of body. In practice, this means that an adult weighing 65 kg should consume approximately 780 mg of lysine per day.

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Research suggests that...

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For therapeutic purposes, one should take between 100 and 4,000 mg of lysine per dayand.

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Dosage depends on age, health or nutritional needs, so always stick to the manufacturer's directions and consult your doctor before starting supplementation.

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L-lysine supplementation at a dose of 3 g per day increases the activity of lysozyme, which is a bactericidal enzyme and protects against the spread of infection.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Can you overdose on lysine?

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Although lysine is considered safe, non-toxic, and there is no indication of a maximum dose, consuming it in large amounts can lead to undesirable side effects.

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Some researchers suggest that you should not take more than 6000 mg (6 g) of lysine per dayand

Side effects

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The most common side effects caused by lysine supplementation , are:

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  • abdominal pain,
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  • diarrhoea,
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  • nausea,
  • .

Gastrointestinal complaints usually last a short time and do not require a medical consultation. If symptoms persist, see a doctor.

Rarely.

Very rarely, serious symptoms such as kidney failure or gallstones may occurand.

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Contraindications and possible interactions

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The main contraindications to taking lysine supplements are mainlyand:

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  • pregnancy and breastfeeding;
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  • calcium supplementation - lysine increases the amount of calcium absorbed, which can lead to so-called hypercalcaemia;
  • .
  • lysine protein intolerance - a rare condition in which the body poorly digests lysine and other amino acids;
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  • planned surgery in the near future;
  • .

Do not use lysine supplements on your own without consulting your doctor if you are taking:

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  • arginine - high levels of arginine can reduce lysine levels;
  • .
  • aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g. gentamicin, streptomycin or neomycin) - use with lysine may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity, i.e. negative effects on kidney function;
  • .
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People with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy should also be wary of lysine supplementation. Studies have shown that it can generate seizuresand.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Summary

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In summary

  • Lysine is an important amino acid that is involved in the construction of proteins, enzymes and hormones.
  • Lysine is an important amino acid that is involved in the construction of proteins, enzymes and hormones.
  • It aids wound healing, collagen production and the fight against herpes.
  • It is an important amino acid.
  • Must supply it with food.
  • .
  • The best sources of lysine are high-protein foods, including red and white meat, eggs, tofu or legumes.
  • .
  • Lysine deficiency is rare, although it can cause symptoms such as weakened immunity, decreased energy, growth problems, dizziness or hair loss.
  • .
  • People on restrictive diets, including vegans, are mainly at risk of lysine deficiency.
  • .
  • For supplementation, choose preparations with free lysine (L-lysine) - it is better absorbed.
  • .

FAQ

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. What vitamin is missing when herpes occurs?.

Perpes is a viral disease and one of the causes of herpes can be insufficient vitamins and minerals, including antioxidants, which are closely linked to your immunity. These may include:

In addition to these, lysine is also important, a reduced amount of which increases susceptibility to herpes.

. Why combine lysine with vitamin C?.

Vitamin C and lysine play a huge role in our body. They interact with many processes and can enhance each other's effects, including:

  • promoting collagen production,
  • .
  • supporting the immune system,
  • .
  • improving the absorption of minerals, e.g. iron.
  • .

See also: What destroys collagen in the body and how to remedy it?

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. Can I take lysine every day? .

Lysine supplementation is safe and there is no set maximum dose. Some studies suggest not to exceed 6 g (6000 mg) of lysine per day. Lysine overdose can cause gastrointestinal unpleasantness, including nausea and diarrhoea.

See: When to drink collagen?

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. What is the most lysine in?.

The best sources of lysine are foods that are high in protein, including white and red meat, beans, tofu, dark chocolate, almonds, spirulina, halibut, salmon, tuna, quinoa or amaranth.

See: What collagen is - the best sources

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. What is limited by lysine?.

Research shows that lysine inhibits the production of arginine, an amino acid that is responsible for, among other things, the spread of the herpes virus in your body.

See also: How to look after your health - advice from a doctor, nutritionist and psychologist

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. Is my body producing lysine?

No. Lysine is an amino acid exogenous, which means your body does not produce it. It is necessary to supply lysine along with food. If you have a known deficiency, you can start lysine supplementation. Before doing so, consult your doctor to determine the dosage.

. Which lysine is best?.

The best lysine is a high-quality supplement that comes from a reputable manufacturer. When choosing a particular product, pay attention to the form (reach only for free lysine - L-lysine), the purity of the composition (check for unnecessary additives and allergens), the dosage (you will encounter mainly 500 and 1000 mg on the market). It is also worth reading reviews on both the product and the manufacturer.

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Resources

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. See all.

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