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The most important types and kinds of collagen: in the skin and joints

Learn about the key types of collagen, their roles in skin, joints and the whole body

Ludwig Jelonek - AuthorAuthorLudwig Jelonek
Ludwig Jelonek - Author
AuthorLudwig Jelonek
Natu.Care Editor

Ludwik Jelonek is the author of more than 2,500 texts published on leading portals. His content has found its way into services such as Ostrovit and Kobieta Onet. At Natu.Care, Ludwik educates people in the most important area of life - health.

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Ilona Bush - Reviewed byReviewed byIlona Bush
Verified by an expert
Ilona Bush - Reviewed by
Reviewed byIlona Bush
Master of Pharmacy

Ilona Krzak obtained her Master of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of Wrocław. She did her internship in a hospital pharmacy and in the pharmaceutical industry. She is currently working in the profession and also runs an educational profile on Instagram: @pani_z_apteki

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Bartholomew Turczynski - Edited byEdited byBartholomew Turczynski
Bartholomew Turczynski - Edited by
Edited byBartholomew Turczynski
Editor-in-Chief

Bartłomiej Turczyński is the editor-in-chief of Natu.Care. He is responsible for the quality of the content created on Natu.Care, among others, and ensures that all articles are based on sound scientific research and consulted with industry specialists.

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Emilia Moskal - Fact-checkingFact-checkingEmilia Moskal
Emilia Moskal - Fact-checking
Fact-checkingEmilia Moskal
Natu.Care Editor

Emilia Moskal specialises in medical and psychological texts, including content for medical entities. She is a fan of simple language and reader-friendly communication. At Natu.Care, she writes educational articles.

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The most important types and kinds of collagen: in the skin and joints
29 April, 2024
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18 min
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Till 30 years ago there were about 15 types of collagen. Now there are 28, and tomorrow there could be 54 - you never know. The types of youth protein are still under the magnifying glass of experts, so new ones are being discovered over the years.

But don't worry, only a few of them are relevant for you, especially type I. That is why, together with Ilona Krzak, M.D. in pharmacy, I will present the most important information about them.

And don't worry.

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From this article you will learn:

  • How many types of collagen there are in the body.
  • .
  • What are the main types of collagen.
  • .
  • Which types of natural collagen are important for the dermis and joints.
  • .

See also:

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How many types of collagen are there in the body?

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To date, scientists have identified 28 types of collagen in the human body. However, this is not the end of the story, due to the complexity of the function and structure of collagen protein, it is likely that more types will be discovered in the future. The most important types of collagen are type I, type II, type III, type IV and type Vand.

Collagen type I

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Collagen type I is a structural protein that is the most important collagen component in the human body. It accounts for as much as 90% of the total collagen pool. The uniqueness of this type of youth protein lies in its strength. It is type I collagen, which gives the skin its elasticity and firmnessand.

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Per gram, type I collagen is stronger than steel.
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Molecular Cell Biology, 6th Edition(Lodish et al., 2007)

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Appearance

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Type I collagen is one of the major tissue builders inand:

  • skin,
  • .
  • tendons,
  • .
  • bones,
  • .
  • teeth,
  • .

You can also find it in muscle membranes, blood vessels and the cornea of the eyeand.

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Inborn bone brittleness is a disorder mainly caused by mutations in genes that are involved in the production of type I collagen.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Function

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The primary function of type I collagen is to provide strength and elasticity to tissues. It builds a network that provides the foundation for normal and healthy tissues in the bodyand.

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Type 1 collagen also provides stability to ligaments, and its deficiency increases the risk of uterine prolapse.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Neuroferrer

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With age, the production of type I collagen naturally declines. This leads to ageing processes such as loss of skin firmness, the formation of wrinkles, and an increased risk of osteoporosis and other bone and joint problemsand.

Collagen deficiency type I can lead to a variety of health problems, includingand:

  • bone fractures,
  • .
  • deterioration of skin condition,
  • .
  • weakening of hair and nail condition,
  • .
  • disorders of joint health,
  • .

One way to combat these ageing processes is collagen supplementation, which can help improve skin, joint and bone healthand.

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Arterial tissue in cigarette smokers has less type 1 collagen than in healthy individuals.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Collagen type II

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Type II collagen is the main structural component of cartilage. It helps maintain its elasticity and promotes strength. Without type II collagen, joints would not be able to withstand the constant pressure and friction during movementand.

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Incidence

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Beyond cartilage, particularly articular cartilage, type II collagen is also present in intervertebral discs and tympanic membrane .

Function

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The main function of type II collagen is to maintain joint health by providing the right texture and elasticity for cartilage. It helps joints to act as shock absorbers, protecting bones from damage during movement.

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Already a low dose of type 2 native collagen - around 40 mg - can have noticeable effects in supporting the treatment of arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Noreferrer

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Similar to type I collagen, type II collagen production naturally declines with age. This leads to reduced cartilage elasticity. This can also contribute to joint problems such as pain, stiffness or reduced mobility.

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Collagen deficiency in osteoarticular tissues and skin has been linked to age, hormonal profile, lack of exercise, obesity, inflammation or mechanical strain, as well as joint damage.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Collagen type III

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Type III collagen is the second most common type of collagen in the body. It is particularly important for the normal structure of blood vessels, skin and wound healingand.

Appearance

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Type III collagen is found in many tissues, but the most important areas where it works areand:

  • Blood vessels. Type III is an important component of blood vessel walls, providing them with elasticity and strength.
  • Blood vessels.
  • The skin.It is often found in the skin along with type I collagen, helping to maintain its firmness and elasticity.
  • Connective tissue. It is present in connective tissue, where it helps to maintain its structure and elasticity.
  • .
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The proper functioning of joints is also influenced by the correct ratio of type I collagen to type III collagen.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Function

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Like other types of collagen, type III collagen is crucial for the structural integrity of tissues. It is essential for the proper functioning of blood vessels and skin, and also helps in the wound healing process by contributing to the formation of new tissuesand.

Neutrality

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Collagen type III deficiency can lead to health problems such as impaired wound healing, easy bruising, weak blood vessels and skin problems. In extreme cases, a deficit of this type of collagen can lead to serious connective tissue diseasesand.

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Type III collagen in bones was only discovered in 1991. Prior to that, it was thought to simply not be there.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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See also:

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Type IV collagen

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Type IV collagen plays an important role in your body's basement membranes. Basement membranes are thin, flattened structures that serve as the foundation for various tissues and organs. Without them, these elements would not work properlyand.

Incidence

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  • Basement membranes. Type IV collagen forms the architecture of the basement membranes, which support many tissues and organsand.
  • .
  • Eyes. It is present in the cornea of the eye, contributing to its normal structure .
  • Kidney. It is important for the structure of the glomeruli (renal structures that filter the blood) .
  • .

Function

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Type IV collagen is crucial for the structure of basement membranes. It is also essential for maintaining the normal structure of many organs, especially the kidneys and eyesand.

Deficiency

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Deficiency of type IV collagen can lead to complications, particularly related to organs that depend on it, such as the eyes and kidneys. Lack of this type of collagen in the basement membranes can result in disorders in the structure and function of these organsand.

In the case of the kidneys, a lack of type IV collagen can manifest itself in a variety of conditions. And in the context of the eyes, it can affect the ability to see properly.

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Deficiencies in type IV collagen synthesis and function are seen in Alport syndrome. These manifest as nephropathy, sensorineural deafness and visual impairment.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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Collagen type V

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Type V collagen is one of the less studied types of collagen, but this does not diminish its importance. It is an essential component of basement membranes and cell detachment filaments. Type V collagen also helps in the development of fibrous tissues and the distribution of cells in the bodyand.

Appearance

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  • Fetal cells. Type V collagen is mainly present in fetal tissues, where it contributes to their normal developmentand.
  • .
  • The skin. It is also present in the skin, where it works together with type I collagen to provide elasticity and firmnessand.
  • .
  • Hair. Contains type V collagen, which contributes to its health and strengthand.
  • The cornea of the eye. Collagen type V is also a key component of the cornea of the eye .
  • .

Function

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Type V collagen is essential for the normal development of the fibrous structure of tissues and the organisation of cells, especially during fetal development. In the skin, hair and cornea of the eye, it helps to maintain healthy, strong structuresand.

Deficiency

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Collagen type V deficiency can contribute to disorders of skin, hair and eye structure. It can also have adverse effects on fetal developmentand.

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Excessive deposition of type V collagen occurs during inflammation, arteriosclerosis and fibrosis of the lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue and liver.
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Ilona Krzak.

Ilona Krzak Master of Pharmacy

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X-type collagen

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Type X collagen is a particular type of collagen that plays a key role in the processes of bone growth and maintenance of bone health. It is an essential structural protein that manifests its activity mainly within bone tissue.

Appearance

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Type X collagen is most commonly found in articular cartilage, where it is an important component of this structural tissueand.

Function

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Type X collagen is essential for the proper functioning of articular cartilage, taking part in its mineralisation process, which ultimately leads to bone formation .

Deficiency

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A deficiency of type X collagen can lead to problems with the progression of bone and cartilage formation. Consequently, this can cause problems with joint function, and lead to disorders in bone architecture and functionand.

What are the other collagen types responsible for?

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Collagen types are under the magnifying glass of specialists all the time, and at the moment there is not much research about the other types of this protein. What do we know about the other types of collagenand?

  • Collagen type VI. Collagen is found in most tissues of the body, mainly in skin, muscle and cartilage. Contributes to the health and elasticity of the skin.
  • .
  • Collagen type VII. Maintains the structure of the skin - plays an important role in the formation of the 'cement' that connects the epidermal layer to the dermis. Deficiency of type VII collagen can lead to serious skin disorders.
  • .
  • Collagen type VIII. It is mainly found in the endothelium of the choroid of the eye.
  • Collagen type IX. Presents in cartilage and is essential for its proper functioning. It works together with type II collagen to support cartilage formation and structure.
  • Collagen.
  • Collagen type XI.  Similar to types II and IX, collagen type XI is present in cartilage and contributes to its structure and strength.
  • Collagen type XII. Presents in tendons, skin and bones, where it interacts with collagen type I, contributing to their elasticity and strength.

Although these types of collagen are less common and studied, they still play important roles in various organs and tissues of your body.

What are the main types of collagen in the dermis?

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The dermis is primarily made up of two types of collagen. The most important types of collagen in the skin areand:

  • Collagen type I.  It makes up about 80-85% of the collagen in the skin and is responsible for its strength and elasticity. Type I collagen provides the skin with elasticity and protects it from damage. A lack of this type of collagen can lead to a loss of skin elasticity and the formation of wrinkles.
  • .
  • Collagen type III.  It makes up almost all of the rest of the collagen in the skin - about 10-15%. It is particularly abundant in young, smooth and firm skin. As we age, the amount of type III collagen in the skin decreases, which is one of the reasons for the loss of skin firmness and the formation of wrinkles.

Both types of collagen found in the skin are essential for maintaining its healthy appearance and function, providing resilience, elasticity and a youthful appearance.

What are the most important types of collagen for joints?

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The two most important types of collagen for joints areand:

  • Collagen type II. This is the predominant collagen in cartilage and is essential for maintaining healthy joints. It helps maintain soft, flexible cartilage that absorbs shock and reduces friction during movement.
  • Collagen type IX. Although found in much smaller amounts, collagen type IX is also important for cartilage structure. It works together with type II collagen to form a mesh that helps keep the cartilage in joints healthy and functional.

Both types of collagen are key to maintaining healthy, mobile and flexible joints. Deficiencies in these types of collagen can lead to joint problems such as pain or reduced mobility.

Types of collagen in... a pill (powder and liquid too)!

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Best overall

Natu.Care Collagen Premium 5000 mg, mango-maracuja

Natu.Care Collagen Premium 5000 mg, mango-maracuja
5.0
  • Collagen content: 5000 mg marine collagen hydrolysate
  • .
  • Additional active ingredients: vitamin C, low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (and L-theanine and coenzyme Q10 in cocoa flavoured collagen or vitamin A and vitamin E in mango–passion fruit flavoured collagen)
  • .
  • Form: powder sachets
  • .
  • Dose: 1 sachet per day
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 30 days
  • .
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

Fish collagen from the Natu.Care brand in a dose of 5000 mg, based on certified ingredients of the best quality. Regular supplementation will positively influence the appearance of the skinóry, hairów and nails – they will be rebuilt and strengthened from the inside.

In addition to collagen, which is valuable for health and beauty, it also offers other active ingredients that help to maintain a youthful complexion, shiny hair and strong nails.

The formula contains a sufficient portion of the active ingredient to positively affect joints, the musculoskeletal system and immunity.

Natu.Care Premium Collagen is available in two flavours – Cacao Bloom and Rise&Shine. Both formulas are based on the following active ingredients: marine collagen hydrolysate, wild roseóbud extract and hyaluronic acid.

Additionally, Cacao Bloom contains natural L-theanine, coenzyme Q10 and defatted Dutch cacao. Rise&Shine instead contains vitamin E and vitamin A.

These are the best collagens in the world.

These best fish collagens on the market also rós taste – Cacao Bloom is a treat for chocolate lovers. Rise&Shine will appeal to those whoólike the refreshing taste of mangoófruit and passion fruit.

Pros and cons

Fish collagen from the Natu.Care brand in a dose of 5000 mg, based on certified ingredients of the best quality. Regular supplementation will positively influence the appearance of the skinóry, hairów and nails – they will be rebuilt and strengthened from the inside.

In addition to collagen, which is valuable for health and beauty, it also offers other active ingredients that help to maintain a youthful complexion, shiny hair and strong nails.

The formula contains a sufficient portion of the active ingredient to positively affect joints, the musculoskeletal system and immunity.

Natu.Care Premium Collagen is available in two flavours – Cacao Bloom and Rise&Shine. Both formulas are based on the following active ingredients: marine collagen hydrolysate, wild roseóbud extract and hyaluronic acid.

Additionally, Cacao Bloom contains natural L-theanine, coenzyme Q10 and defatted Dutch cacao. Rise&Shine instead contains vitamin E and vitamin A.

These are the best collagens in the world.

These best fish collagens on the market also rós taste – Cacao Bloom is a treat for chocolate lovers. Rise&Shine will appeal to those whoólike the refreshing taste of mangoófruit and passion fruit.

Additional information

Fish collagen from the Natu.Care brand in a dose of 5000 mg, based on certified ingredients of the best quality. Regular supplementation will positively influence the appearance of the skinóry, hairów and nails – they will be rebuilt and strengthened from the inside.

In addition to collagen, which is valuable for health and beauty, it also offers other active ingredients that help to maintain a youthful complexion, shiny hair and strong nails.

The formula contains a sufficient portion of the active ingredient to positively affect joints, the musculoskeletal system and immunity.

Natu.Care Premium Collagen is available in two flavours – Cacao Bloom and Rise&Shine. Both formulas are based on the following active ingredients: marine collagen hydrolysate, wild roseóbud extract and hyaluronic acid.

Additionally, Cacao Bloom contains natural L-theanine, coenzyme Q10 and defatted Dutch cacao. Rise&Shine instead contains vitamin E and vitamin A.

These are the best collagens in the world.

These best fish collagens on the market also rós taste – Cacao Bloom is a treat for chocolate lovers. Rise&Shine will appeal to those whoólike the refreshing taste of mangoófruit and passion fruit.

User review

Fish collagen from the Natu.Care brand in a dose of 5000 mg, based on certified ingredients of the best quality. Regular supplementation will positively influence the appearance of the skinóry, hairów and nails – they will be rebuilt and strengthened from the inside.

In addition to collagen, which is valuable for health and beauty, it also offers other active ingredients that help to maintain a youthful complexion, shiny hair and strong nails.

The formula contains a sufficient portion of the active ingredient to positively affect joints, the musculoskeletal system and immunity.

Natu.Care Premium Collagen is available in two flavours – Cacao Bloom and Rise&Shine. Both formulas are based on the following active ingredients: marine collagen hydrolysate, wild roseóbud extract and hyaluronic acid.

Additionally, Cacao Bloom contains natural L-theanine, coenzyme Q10 and defatted Dutch cacao. Rise&Shine instead contains vitamin E and vitamin A.

These are the best collagens in the world.

These best fish collagens on the market also rós taste – Cacao Bloom is a treat for chocolate lovers. Rise&Shine will appeal to those whoólike the refreshing taste of mangoófruit and passion fruit.

Refreshing taste

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg, various flavours

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg, various flavours
4.7
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

Dietary supplement in a highly bioavailable form of hydrolysed collagen SeaGarden fish®. This formula has high bioavailability– youróbody will use collagen faster and more efficiently where you need it most. 

A 3,000 mg serving of collagen benefits your hair, skinóhand and nails, as well as the functioning of your jointsómuscles and bones. The action of collagen is complemented by vitamin C, whichóra supports the natural production of the youth protein in the body and also helps with its absorption. It is also a great anti-ageing antioxidant.

Natu.Care's Collagen 3000 mg is available in three fruit flavours (orange, raspberry-cranberry, blackcurrant) and a flavourless variant. The powder dissolves very well, does not form lumps in the liquid and you can add it to your favourite yoghurt, oatmeal or smoothie.

Pros and cons

Dietary supplement in a highly bioavailable form of hydrolysed collagen SeaGarden fish®. This formula has high bioavailability– youróbody will use collagen faster and more efficiently where you need it most. 

A 3,000 mg serving of collagen benefits your hair, skinóhand and nails, as well as the functioning of your jointsómuscles and bones. The action of collagen is complemented by vitamin C, whichóra supports the natural production of the youth protein in the body and also helps with its absorption. It is also a great anti-ageing antioxidant.

Natu.Care's Collagen 3000 mg is available in three fruit flavours (orange, raspberry-cranberry, blackcurrant) and a flavourless variant. The powder dissolves very well, does not form lumps in the liquid and you can add it to your favourite yoghurt, oatmeal or smoothie.

Additional information

Dietary supplement in a highly bioavailable form of hydrolysed collagen SeaGarden fish®. This formula has high bioavailability– youróbody will use collagen faster and more efficiently where you need it most. 

A 3,000 mg serving of collagen benefits your hair, skinóhand and nails, as well as the functioning of your jointsómuscles and bones. The action of collagen is complemented by vitamin C, whichóra supports the natural production of the youth protein in the body and also helps with its absorption. It is also a great anti-ageing antioxidant.

Natu.Care's Collagen 3000 mg is available in three fruit flavours (orange, raspberry-cranberry, blackcurrant) and a flavourless variant. The powder dissolves very well, does not form lumps in the liquid and you can add it to your favourite yoghurt, oatmeal or smoothie.

Pure collagen

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg, tasteless

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg, tasteless
4.6
  • Collagen content: 3000 mg collagen hydrolysate fish
  • Additional active ingredients: none
  • .
  • Form: powder
  • .
  • Dose: one scoop per day
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 30 days
  • .
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

The dietary supplement contains only pure fish collagen in the formula SeaGarden®. This Norwegian collagen is characterised by its purity and high bioavailability, which means that youróy body will utilise the collagen faster and more effectively.

Regular supplementation fish collagen benefits hair, skinóhand and nails and supports joints, muscles and bones. It improves the appearance of the skinóry and slows down its ageing, giving it a healthy glow.

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg has a neutral taste, dissolves well, does not form lumps in liquid and you can add it to your drink, yoghurt or smoothie.

Pros and cons

The dietary supplement contains only pure fish collagen in the formula SeaGarden®. This Norwegian collagen is characterised by its purity and high bioavailability, which means that youróy body will utilise the collagen faster and more effectively.

Regular supplementation fish collagen benefits hair, skinóhand and nails and supports joints, muscles and bones. It improves the appearance of the skinóry and slows down its ageing, giving it a healthy glow.

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg has a neutral taste, dissolves well, does not form lumps in liquid and you can add it to your drink, yoghurt or smoothie.

Additional information

The dietary supplement contains only pure fish collagen in the formula SeaGarden®. This Norwegian collagen is characterised by its purity and high bioavailability, which means that youróy body will utilise the collagen faster and more effectively.

Regular supplementation fish collagen benefits hair, skinóhand and nails and supports joints, muscles and bones. It improves the appearance of the skinóry and slows down its ageing, giving it a healthy glow.

Natu.Care Collagen 3000 mg has a neutral taste, dissolves well, does not form lumps in liquid and you can add it to your drink, yoghurt or smoothie.

Aura Herbals Colladrop Forte

Aura Herbals Colladrop Forte
4.5
  • Collagen content: 10,000 mg sea collagen
  • Additional active ingredients: vitamin C and coenzyme Q10
  • Form: sachets of powder
  • .
  • Dosage: one sachet per day
  • .
  • Sufficient for: 30 days
  • .
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

A dietary supplement containing fish collagen for drinking in a high dose of 10,000 mg hydrolysate. It also offers you additional health and beauty benefits thanks to its coenzyme Q10 and vitamin C content. Supplementation with collagen can improve the appearance of your skinóskin, hairónails and improve the function of your jointsómuscles and bones.

Pros and cons

A dietary supplement containing fish collagen for drinking in a high dose of 10,000 mg hydrolysate. It also offers you additional health and beauty benefits thanks to its coenzyme Q10 and vitamin C content. Supplementation with collagen can improve the appearance of your skinóskin, hairónails and improve the function of your jointsómuscles and bones.

Additional information

A dietary supplement containing fish collagen for drinking in a high dose of 10,000 mg hydrolysate. It also offers you additional health and beauty benefits thanks to its coenzyme Q10 and vitamin C content. Supplementation with collagen can improve the appearance of your skinóskin, hairónails and improve the function of your jointsómuscles and bones.

 

Best shot

Primabiotic Collagen

Primabiotic Collagen
4.4
See price
in the Natu.Care shop
Product description

Collagen enriched with a vitamin complex, in the form of convenient fruit-flavoured shotsós. The dietary supplement has rejuvenating properties. It will make your skin elastic, smoother and stronger. You will also see the positive effects of collagen on your hair and nails.

.

Regular supplementation will improve jointómuscle function and strengthen bones. 

.
Pros and cons

Collagen enriched with a vitamin complex, in the form of convenient fruit-flavoured shotsós. The dietary supplement has rejuvenating properties. It will make your skin elastic, smoother and stronger. You will also see the positive effects of collagen on your hair and nails.

.

Regular supplementation will improve jointómuscle function and strengthen bones. 

.
Additional information

Collagen enriched with a vitamin complex, in the form of convenient fruit-flavoured shotsós. The dietary supplement has rejuvenating properties. It will make your skin elastic, smoother and stronger. You will also see the positive effects of collagen on your hair and nails.

.

Regular supplementation will improve jointómuscle function and strengthen bones. 

.
User review

Collagen enriched with a vitamin complex, in the form of convenient fruit-flavoured shotsós. The dietary supplement has rejuvenating properties. It will make your skin elastic, smoother and stronger. You will also see the positive effects of collagen on your hair and nails.

.

Regular supplementation will improve jointómuscle function and strengthen bones. 

.
 

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See also:

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Summary

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.
  • Scientists have identified 28 types of collagen in the human body, but this number may be increasing.
  • Type I collagen, which makes up 90% of the total collagen pool, is the key structural protein that gives skin its elasticity and firmness.
  • Type II collagen is the main component of cartilage, which enables it to maintain its elasticity and strength.
  • Type III collagen is particularly important for the formation of blood vessels, skin and proper wound healing.
  • Type IV collagen plays an important role in the basement membranes of the body, particularly important for the structure of many organs.
  • Type V collagen is an essential component of basement membranes and cell detachment filaments, assisting in the development of fibrous tissues and the distribution of cells in the body.
  • Type X collagen is essential for growth processes and maintaining bone health.
  • .
  • Other types of collagen, less studied, also play important roles in various organs and tissues of the body.
.

FAQ

.
. Why is type I collagen the most important in the body?.

Collagen type I is the most important in the body because it is found in most tissue structures, including skinbones, tendons, and blood vessels, accounting for about 90% of all collagen in the body.

. Is there type II collagen in drug form?.

No, type II collagen is not available in drug form. Collagen, in any form, is widely available as a dietary supplement to support the health of joints or skin. However, you won't find it in drug form.

. What type of collagen is best for the skin?.

For health and beauty skin the most recommended is usually type I collagen. It is the main component of the dermis, and its supplementation can help improve elasticity, hydration and reduce wrinkles.

. Which collagen to choose - type I or type II?.

Choosing between type I and type II collagen depends on individual needs.

Type I collagen is the most common in the body and supports the health of the skin, bones, tendons and blood vessels. Therefore, it may be a good choice for those wishing to improve skin elasticity or bone health.

Collagen is the most common type of collagen in the body.

On the other hand, type II collagen is the main constituent protein of cartilage, making it suitable for people with joint problems or who want to negate the risk of cartilage problems.

. Are collagen and gelatine the same thing?.

No, although collagen and gelatin are related, they are not the same. Collagen is a protein found naturally in animal bodies, while gelatin is a derived product that is made by cooking collagen-rich tissues. Gelatin is widely used in the food industry, while collagen is often used in dietary supplements.

. What foods is collagen in?".

Collagen naturally occurs in products of animal origin. Rich sources of this protein are broths and stocks cooked from animal bones and cartilage. Other sources include beef, pork and fish (especially their skin).

Also, jellies and other products containing gelatine (made from collagen) also help supplement this protein.

. What are collagen peptides?.

Collagen peptides are a form of collagen that has been hydrolysed, meaning that collagen proteins have been broken down into smaller chains of amino acids, called peptides. This process makes collagen peptides easier for the body to absorb and can be used quickly to rebuild collagen tissue in the body.

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They are often used in collagen dietary supplements due to their high bioavailability and effectiveness.

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